multitude


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mul·ti·tude

 (mŭl′tĭ-to͞od′, -tyo͞od′)
n.
1. A very great number.
2. The masses; the populace: the concerns of the multitude.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin multitūdō, from multus, many; see mel- in Indo-European roots.]
Synonyms: multitude, army, host2, legion
These nouns denote a large number of people or things that have some attribute in common or that operate together as a larger unit: a multitude of stars in the sky; an army of ants; a host of problems; a legion of complaints.

multitude

(ˈmʌltɪˌtjuːd)
n
1. a large gathering of people
2. (Sociology) the multitude the common people
3. a large number
4. the state or quality of being numerous
[C14: via Old French from Latin multitūdō]

mul•ti•tude

(ˈmʌl tɪˌtud, -ˌtyud)

n.
1. a great number; host.
2. a great number of people gathered together; crowd; throng.
3. the state or character of being many; numerousness.
4. populace; masses.
[1275–1325; Middle English < Latin multitūdō. See multi-, -tude]
syn: See crowd.

Multitude

 a great number; a host of persons or things. See also army.
Examples: multitude of actions, 1651; of barnacles, 1875; of cares; of favours, 1586; of mercy, 1450; of misery, 1777; of money, 1529; of peace, 1560; of people, 1470; of questions, 1773; of riches, 1325; of serpents, 1375; of sins; of stars; of waters, 1604; of words, 1683.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.multitude - a large indefinite numbermultitude - a large indefinite number; "a battalion of ants"; "a multitude of TV antennas"; "a plurality of religions"
large indefinite amount, large indefinite quantity - an indefinite quantity that is above the average in size or magnitude
2.multitude - a large gathering of peoplemultitude - a large gathering of people    
assemblage, gathering - a group of persons together in one place
hive - a teeming multitude
horde, host, legion - a vast multitude
ruck, herd - a crowd especially of ordinary or undistinguished persons or things; "his brilliance raised him above the ruck"; "the children resembled a fairy herd"
3.multitude - the common people generallymultitude - the common people generally; "separate the warriors from the mass"; "power to the people"
group, grouping - any number of entities (members) considered as a unit
laity, temporalty - in Christianity, members of a religious community that do not have the priestly responsibilities of ordained clergy
audience - the part of the general public interested in a source of information or entertainment; "every artist needs an audience"; "the broadcast reached an audience of millions"
followers, following - a group of followers or enthusiasts

multitude

noun
1. great number, lot, host, collection, army, sea, mass, assembly, legion, horde, myriad, concourse, assemblage Addiction to drugs can bring a multitude of other problems.
2. crowd, host, mass, mob, congregation, swarm, sea, horde, throng, great number the multitudes that surround the Pope
3. public, mob, herd, populace, rabble, proletariat, common people, hoi polloi, commonalty The hideous truth was hidden from the multitude.

multitude

noun
1. An enormous number of persons gathered together:
2. A very large number of things grouped together:
army, cloud, crowd, drove, flock, horde, host, legion, mass, mob, ruck, score (used in plural), swarm, throng.
Translations
حَشْد ، جُمْهور
množství
mængdemasse
gomilamasamnoštvopuksvjetina
mannföldi, mergî
daudzums
bir yığınçok sayıda

multitude

[ˈmʌltɪtjuːd] N
1. (= crowd) → multitud f, muchedumbre f
they came in multitudesacudieron en tropel
the multitude (pej) → las masas, la plebe
2. (fig) a multitude of problemsuna infinidad de problemas, multitud de problemas
there are a multitude of reasons why we shouldn't do ithay multitud de razones por las que no deberíamos hacerlo
for a multitude of reasonspor múltiples razones

multitude

[ˈmʌltɪtjuːd] n
(= large number) → multitude f
a multitude of [+ reasons, ideas, problems] → une multitude de
to cover a multitude of sins [word, term] → vouloir dire n'importe quoi
"Strong, centralized government" is a term that can cover a multitude of sins → "Gouvernement central fort" est un terme qui peut vouloir dire n'importe quoi.
to hide a multitude of sins [long skirts, baggy trousers] → cacher tout
(= crowd) → foule f, multitude f

multitude

nMenge f; a multitude ofeine Vielzahl von, eine Menge; (of people also)eine Schar (von); for a multitude of reasonsaus vielerlei Gründen; they came in their multitudessie kamen scharenweise

multitude

[ˈmʌltɪˌtjuːd] nmoltitudine f

multitude

(ˈmaltitjuːd) noun
a great number or crowd. a multitude of reasons; multitudes of people.
References in classic literature ?
Love covers a multitude of sins, and of whom could you ask more freely than of him?
Now that he had come out of town where the presence of the people stirring about, busy with a multitude of affairs, had been so irritating, the irritation was all gone.
No multitude of words could have been more significant than those moments of silence, or more pregnant with the first-felt throbbings of desire.
A few had straggled among the conquered columns, where they stalked in sullen discontent; attentive, though, as yet, passive observers of the moving multitude.
About this time I returned to Kentucke with my family; and here, to avoid an enquiry into my conduct, the reader being before informed of my bringing my family to Kentucke, I am under the necessity of informing him that, during my captivity with the Indians, my wife, who despaired of ever seeing me again, expecting the Indians had put a period to my life, oppressed with the distresses of the country, and bereaved of me, her only happiness, had, before I returned, transported my family and goods, on horses, through the wilderness, amidst a multitude of dangers, to her father's house, in North-Carolina.
On one side of the street this splendid bazaar, with a multitude of perfumed and glossy salesmen, smirking, smiling, bowing, and measuring out the goods.
Knowing well her part, she ascended a flight of wooden steps, and was thus displayed to the surrounding multitude, at about the height of a man's shoulders above the street.
He would then begin again at the next fifty; seeming to commence at number one each time, as though he could not count more than fifty, and it was only by such a large number of fifties being found together, that his astonishment at the multitude of pages was excited.
But here be it premised, that owing to the unwearied activity with which of late they have been hunted over all four oceans, the Sperm Whales, instead of almost invariably sailing in small detached companies, as in former times, are now frequently met with in extensive herds, sometimes embracing so great a multitude, that it would almost seem as if numerous nations of them had sworn solemn league and covenant for mutual assistance and protection.
There she is, sitting now in her state-room, surrounded by a mixed multitude of little and big carpet-bags, boxes, baskets, each containing some separate responsibility which she is tying, binding up, packing, or fastening, with a face of great earnestness.
He tied some metal mugs to a dog's tail and turned him loose, and he tore around and around the place in a frenzy of fright, with all the other dogs bellowing after him and battering and crashing against everything that came in their way and making altogether a chaos of confusion and a most deafening din and turmoil; at which every man and woman of the multitude laughed till the tears flowed, and some fell out of their chairs and wallowed on the floor in ecstasy.
Away down on the level under the black mass of the Castle, the town lay, stretched along the river, its intricate cobweb of streets jeweled with twinkling lights; there were rows of lights on the bridges; these flung lances of light upon the water, in the black shadows of the arches; and away at the extremity of all this fairy spectacle blinked and glowed a massed multitude of gas-jets which seemed to cover acres of ground; it was as if all the diamonds in the world had been spread out there.