multivalent

(redirected from multivalences)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.
Related to multivalences: valence

mul·ti·va·lent

 (mŭl′tĭ-vā′lənt, mŭl-tĭv′ə-lənt)
adj.
1. Genetics Of or relating to the association of three or more homologous chromosomes during the first division of meiosis.
2. Chemistry & Immunology Polyvalent.
3. Having various meanings or values: subtle, multivalent allegory.

mul′ti·va′lence n.

multivalent

(ˌmʌltɪˈveɪlənt)
adj
(Chemistry) another word for polyvalent
ˌmultiˈvalency, ˌmultiˈvalence n

mul•ti•va•lent

(ˌmʌl tɪˈveɪ lənt, mʌlˈtɪv ə lənt)

adj.
1. having a chemical valence of three or higher.
2.
a. containing several kinds of antibody.
b. pertaining to an antibody that contains many antigen-binding sites.
[1870–75]
mul`ti•va′lence, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.multivalent - used of the association of three or more homologous chromosomes during the first division of meiosis
genetic science, genetics - the branch of biology that studies heredity and variation in organisms
bivalent, double - used of homologous chromosomes associated in pairs in synapsis
univalent - used of a chromosome that is not paired or united with its homologous chromosome during synapsis; "a univalent chromosome"
2.multivalent - having more than one valence, or having a valence of 3 or higher
chemical science, chemistry - the science of matter; the branch of the natural sciences dealing with the composition of substances and their properties and reactions
3.multivalent - having many values, meanings, or appeals; "subtle, multivalent allegory"
ambiguous - having more than one possible meaning; "ambiguous words"; "frustrated by ambiguous instructions, the parents were unable to assemble the toy"
References in periodicals archive ?
Identifying multivalences of meaning and multivalences of text, he argues that in reconstructing textual history of early Jewish writings, scholars need to become more alert to the possibility that textual variations in their earliest known historical contexts are not necessarily the results of intentional or unintentional scribal intrusions into a hypothetical pristine original.
Variant vocalizations are, in any case, common in early biblical interpretation (Martin offers one additional example in chapter 9, "More Multivalence in the Song"), and the possibility of deliberate ambiguity is certainly worthy of further exploration.