mummy


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mum·my 1

 (mŭm′ē)
n. pl. mum·mies
1. The dead body of a human or animal that has been embalmed and prepared for burial, as according to the practices of the ancient Egyptians.
2. A withered, shrunken, or well-preserved body that resembles an embalmed body.

[Middle English mummie, resin obtained from embalmed corpses and used as medicine, from Old French momie, from Medieval Latin mumia, from Arabic mūmiyā', mūmiyā, a kind of bitumen used to treat wounds and fractures, medicinal resin from mummies.]

mum·my 2

 (mŭm′ē)
n. pl. mum·mies Informal
Mother.

[Alteration of mommy or mum.]

mummy

(ˈmʌmɪ)
n, pl -mies
1. (Archaeology) an embalmed or preserved body, esp as prepared for burial in ancient Egypt
2. (Medicine) obsolete the substance of such a body used medicinally
3. a mass of pulp
4. (Dyeing) a dark brown pigment
[C14: from Old French momie, from Medieval Latin mumia, from Arabic mūmiyah asphalt, from Persian mūm wax]

mummy

(ˈmʌmɪ)
n, pl -mies
chiefly Brit a child's word for mother1
[C19: variant of mum1]

mum•my1

(ˈmʌm i)

n., pl. -mies, n.
1. the dead body of a human being or animal preserved by the ancient Egyptian process or some similar method of embalming.
2. a dead body dried and preserved by nature.
3. a withered living being.
v.t.
4. to mummify.
[1605–15; < Medieval Latin mummia < Arabic mūmiyah mummy, literally, bitumen < Persian mūm wax]

mum•my2

(ˈmʌm i)

n., pl. -mies. Chiefly Brit.
[1815–25]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.mummy - informal terms for a mothermummy - informal terms for a mother    
female parent, mother - a woman who has given birth to a child (also used as a term of address to your mother); "the mother of three children"
2.mummy - a body embalmed and dried and wrapped for burial (as in ancient Egypt)
dead body, body - a natural object consisting of a dead animal or person; "they found the body in the lake"
Translations
أُم، مامامَامَامُومِيَاءُمومْياء
mumiemámamaminka
mumiemor
panjo
مومیا
äiskääitimuumio
अम्माँ
mamicamumija
múmia
mammamúmía, smurlingur
ママミイラ
미라엄마
mumija
māmiņamammītemūmija
múmiamamamamimamička
mamica
mammamumie
แม่มัมมี่
mẹxác ướp

mummy

1 [ˈmʌmɪ] N (= preserved corpse) → momia f

mummy

[ˈmʌmi] n
(British) (= mother) → maman f
Mummy says I can go → Maman dit que je peux y aller.
I want my mummy → Je veux ma maman.
(embalmed)momie f

mummy

1
n (= corpse)Mumie f

mummy

2
n (Brit inf: = mother) → Mami f (inf), → Mama f (inf)

mummy

1 [ˈmʌmɪ] n (Brit) (fam) (mother) → mamma
he's a mummy's boy → è un mammone

mummy

2 [ˈmʌmɪ] n (embalmed corpse) → mummia

mummy2

(ˈmami) plural ˈmummies noun
a dead human body preserved eg by the ancient Egyptians by wrapping in bandages and treating with spice, wax etc.

mummy

مَامَا, مُومِيَاءُ maminka, mumie mor, mumie Mami, Mumie μαμάκα, μούμια mami, momia äiskä, muumio maman, momie mamica, mumija mamma, mummia ママ, ミイラ 미라, 엄마 mama, mummie mamma, mumie mamusia, mumia mamã, mamãe, múmia мама, мумия mamma, mumie แม่, มัมมี่ anneciğim, mumya mẹ, xác ướp 妈咪, 木乃伊
References in classic literature ?
But he's written a wonderful story, telling how he happened to come across the ancient manuscripts in the tomb of some old Indian whose mummy he unearthed on a trip to Central America.
Sometimes, in place of the criticism, the first-class daily gives you what it thinks is a gay and chipper essay--about ancient Grecian funeral customs, or the ancient Egyptian method of tarring a mummy, or the reasons for believing that some of the peoples who existed before the flood did not approve of cats.
I believe the master would relish Earnshaw's thrashing him to a mummy, if he were not his son; and I'm certain he would be fit to turn him out of doors, if he knew half the nursing he gives hisseln.
Imagine twenty thousand of them breaking into the midst of an European army, confounding the ranks, overturning the carriages, battering the warriors' faces into mummy by terrible yerks from their hinder hoofs; for they would well deserve the character given to Augustus, RECALCITRAT UNDIQUE TUTUS.
Don't believe him, mummy, don't believe him," she repeated.
The landlady and her daughter could see no one more free to give aid than Don Quixote, and to him the daughter said, "Sir knight, by the virtue God has given you, help my poor father, for two wicked men are beating him to a mummy.
All who know him declare that they have never met, not even in the Egyptian museum at Turin, so agreeable a mummy.
Then a door opened at the far side of the chamber and a strange, dried up, little mummy of a man came toward me.
Several of the audience, not being much interested in the missionary's narrative, here left the car; but Elder Hitch, continuing his lecture, related how Smith, junior, with his father, two brothers, and a few disciples, founded the church of the "Latter Day Saints," which, adopted not only in America, but in England, Norway and Sweden, and Germany, counts many artisans, as well as men engaged in the liberal professions, among its members; how a colony was established in Ohio, a temple erected there at a cost of two hundred thousand dollars, and a town built at Kirkland; how Smith became an enterprising banker, and received from a simple mummy showman a papyrus scroll written by Abraham and several famous Egyptians.
Porthos seized his opportunity, caught the next soldier by his neck, gagged him and pushed him like a mummy through the bars into the room, and entered after him.
Says I to myself, to-night, he's more like a ghost or an old mummy than good flesh and blood.
He was from beyond the sea, a Doctor Cacaphodel, who had wilted and dried himself into a mummy by continually stooping over charcoal furnaces, and inhaling unwholesome fumes during his researches in chemistry and alchemy.