murid

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murid

n
(Animals) any rodent of the family Muridae
adj
(Zoology) of or relating to the Muridae family of rodents

murid

n
(Islam) (in the philosophy of the Sufi religion)a person who is guided by a murshid or pir

mu•rine

(ˈmyʊər aɪn, -ɪn)

adj.
1. belonging or pertaining to the Muridae, the family of rodents that includes the mice and rats.
n.
2. a murine rodent.
[1600–10; < Latin mūrīnus of mice; derivative of mūr- mouse]
References in periodicals archive ?
The man who was to defiver the medicines was a Murid who was in a hurry to get to the Maggal Touba, the Murids' main annual event several hours' drive away.
These religious dues are given to the Imam by his murids as a key practice of Shia Islam and the Imam manages and spends the religious dues on the community and institutional development that benefits all people.
Reconciling his private experience of French colonial repression with his unfaltering religious beliefs during moments of trail, his poetry was pivotal to the large population known as the Murids of Senegal.
He was also regarded as a Sufi Pir and used to accept murids or pupils.
However, they often wore them when they didn't wish to answer questions from their murids (followers).
The murids are ridgelike and longitudinally oriented along the midline of the tooth.
On the other hand, Ibn Khallikan reports that Shy1/2'ite tendencies belonged not to him but rather to his murids, who took refuge in his tekke at Suluca Kara Oyuk in KyrE-ehir after the Babai Revolt.
Abstract Distribution patterns and relative abundance of the commensal murids in different types of shops of urban areas of Rawalpindi Pakistan were recorded from February to October 2011 using cage traps.
It deals in its seventeen chapters wit h many aspects such as the activities of the silsila and the spread of Islam the exhortations of the Shaikh to his murids the places where prominent members of the silsila are buried etc.
Their daily lives are mostly spent struggling to cope with their surroundings, but the moderate approach of their Sheikh toward this world facilitates their lives of murids (disciples) in modern London setting.
19) Sufi orders were mostly androcentric institutions; however, female mystics did participate as murids in several orders (20) and thus filled the popular imagination with stories and visions of sexual and spiritual bonds between the female or male murid and a male pir.