muse


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Muse

 (myo͞oz)
n.
1. Greek Mythology Any of the nine daughters of Mnemosyne and Zeus, each of whom presided over a different art or science.
2. muse
a. A guiding spirit.
b. A source of inspiration: the lover who was the painter's muse.
3. muse Archaic A poet.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin Mūsa, from Greek Mousa; see men- in Indo-European roots.]
Word History: Ever since Chaucer first mentions the Muses in a work from around 1390, English poets have invoked these goddesses like so many other versifiers since the days of Homer, who begins both The Iliad and The Odyssey with an invocation of his Muse. The word Muse comes from Latin Mūsa, which in turn is from Greek Mousa. In Greek dialects, this word is found in the variant forms mōsa and moisa, and together these indicate that the Greek word comes from an original *montwa. As to the further origins of this form, a clue is provided by the name of Mnemosyne, the goddess of memory and mother of the Muses. Her name is simply the Greek noun mnēmosunē, "memory"—the faculty of memory was indeed the mother of invention for the ancient Greek professional poets and bards whose job it was to compose new poems in traditional styles on festive occasions, to recite the verses of Homer, and to improvise material whenever they had a memory lapse. Greek mnēmosunē is derived from the root *mnā-, an extended form of the Greek and Indo-European root *men-, "to think." This is the root from which English also gets the words amnesia (from Greek), mental (from Latin), and mind (from Germanic). The reconstructed form *montwa, the ancestor of Greek Mousa, also comes from this root and probably originally referred to "mental power" that enables poets to craft verses—the Muses were the Greek poets' divinized conceptions of the faculties that help them to create and recite poetry.

muse

 (myo͞oz)
v. mused, mus·ing, mus·es
v.intr.
To be absorbed in one's thoughts; engage in thought.
v.tr.
To consider or say thoughtfully: mused that it might take longer to drive than walk.
n.
A state of reflection.

[Middle English musen, from Old French muser (possibly from mus, snout, from Medieval Latin mūsum) and or of Germanic origin.]

mus′er n.

muse

(mjuːz)
vb
1. (when: intr, often foll by on or about) to reflect (about) or ponder (on), usually in silence
2. (intr) to gaze thoughtfully
n
archaic a state of abstraction
[C14: from Old French muser, perhaps from mus snout, from Medieval Latin mūsus]
ˈmuser n
ˈmuseful adj
ˈmusefully adv

muse

(mjuːz)
n
(Poetry) a woman who inspires a creative artist, esp a poet
[C14: from Old French, from Latin Mūsa, from Greek Mousa a Muse]

Muse

(mjuːz)
n
(Classical Myth & Legend) Greek myth any of nine sister goddesses, each of whom was regarded as the protectress of a different art or science. Daughters of Zeus and Mnemosyne, the nine are Calliope, Clio, Erato, Euterpe, Melpomene, Polyhymnia, Terpsichore, Thalia, and Urania

muse

(myuz)

v. mused, mus•ing. v.i.
1. to think or meditate in silence.
2. Archaic. to gaze meditatively or wonderingly.
v.t.
3. to say or think meditatively.
[1300–50; Middle English: to mutter, gaze meditatively on < Middle French muser, perhaps ultimately derivative of Medieval Latin mūsum muzzle]
mus′er, n.

Muse

(myuz)

n.
1. one of the nine Greek goddesses, daughters of Zeus and Mnemosyne, who presided over the arts: Calliope, Clio, Erato, Euterpe, Melpomene, Polyhymnia, Terpsichore, Thalia, and Urania.
2. (sometimes l.c.) the inspiration that motivates a poet, artist, or thinker.
3. (l.c.) a poet.
[1350–1400; < Middle French < Latin < Greek Moûsa]

muse


Past participle: mused
Gerund: musing

Imperative
muse
muse
Present
I muse
you muse
he/she/it muses
we muse
you muse
they muse
Preterite
I mused
you mused
he/she/it mused
we mused
you mused
they mused
Present Continuous
I am musing
you are musing
he/she/it is musing
we are musing
you are musing
they are musing
Present Perfect
I have mused
you have mused
he/she/it has mused
we have mused
you have mused
they have mused
Past Continuous
I was musing
you were musing
he/she/it was musing
we were musing
you were musing
they were musing
Past Perfect
I had mused
you had mused
he/she/it had mused
we had mused
you had mused
they had mused
Future
I will muse
you will muse
he/she/it will muse
we will muse
you will muse
they will muse
Future Perfect
I will have mused
you will have mused
he/she/it will have mused
we will have mused
you will have mused
they will have mused
Future Continuous
I will be musing
you will be musing
he/she/it will be musing
we will be musing
you will be musing
they will be musing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been musing
you have been musing
he/she/it has been musing
we have been musing
you have been musing
they have been musing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been musing
you will have been musing
he/she/it will have been musing
we will have been musing
you will have been musing
they will have been musing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been musing
you had been musing
he/she/it had been musing
we had been musing
you had been musing
they had been musing
Conditional
I would muse
you would muse
he/she/it would muse
we would muse
you would muse
they would muse
Past Conditional
I would have mused
you would have mused
he/she/it would have mused
we would have mused
you would have mused
they would have mused
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.muse - in ancient Greek mythology any of 9 daughters of Zeus and MnemosyneMuse - in ancient Greek mythology any of 9 daughters of Zeus and Mnemosyne; protector of an art or science
Greek deity - a deity worshipped by the ancient Greeks
2.muse - the source of an artist's inspiration; "Euterpe was his muse"
germ, source, seed - anything that provides inspiration for later work
Verb1.muse - reflect deeply on a subject; "I mulled over the events of the afternoon"; "philosophers have speculated on the question of God for thousands of years"; "The scientist must stop to observe and start to excogitate"
cerebrate, cogitate, think - use or exercise the mind or one's power of reason in order to make inferences, decisions, or arrive at a solution or judgments; "I've been thinking all day and getting nowhere"
premeditate - think or reflect beforehand or in advance; "I rarely premeditate, which is a mistake"
theologise, theologize - make theoretical speculations about theology or discuss theological subjects
introspect - reflect on one's own thoughts and feelings
bethink - consider or ponder something carefully; "She bethought her of their predicament"
cogitate - consider carefully and deeply; reflect upon; turn over in one's mind
wonder, question - place in doubt or express doubtful speculation; "I wonder whether this was the right thing to do"; "she wondered whether it would snow tonight"
puzzle - be uncertain about; think about without fully understanding or being able to decide; "We puzzled over her sudden departure"
consider, study - give careful consideration to; "consider the possibility of moving"

muse

verb ponder, consider, reflect, contemplate, think, weigh up, deliberate, speculate, brood, meditate, mull over, think over, ruminate, cogitate, be lost in thought, be in a brown study Many of the papers mused on the fate of the President. He lay and mused in the warm sunlight.

muse 1

verb
1. To experience dreams or daydreams:

muse 2

noun
1. One who writes poetry:
2. The condition of being so lost in solitary thought as to be unaware of one's surroundings:
Translations
يَتأمَّل
dumat
fundereMuse
muusa
brjóta heilann um e-î
mintimis perkratinėti
apcerētpārdomāt
muza
musa
düşünceye dalmak

Muse

[mjuːz] Nmusa f
the Museslas Musas

muse

[mjuːz]
A. VI to muse on or about sthreflexionar sobre algo, meditar algo
B. VT "should we?" he mused-¿debemos hacerlo? -dijo pensativo

muse

[ˈmjuːz]
viméditer, songer
nmuse f

Muse

n (Myth) → Muse f

muse

vinachgrübeln, nachsinnen (liter) (→ about, on über +acc)
vtgrüblerisch or sinnierend (liter)sagen
nMuse f

Muse

[mjuːz] n (Myth) → Musa

muse

1 [mjuːz] n (fig) → musa

muse

2 [mjuːz] vi to muse on or about sthrimuginare or meditare su qc

muse

(mjuːz) verb
to think about a matter usually without serious concentration.
References in classic literature ?
deducam Musas'; `for I shall be the first, if I live, to bring the Muse into my country.
Marija was one of those hungry souls who cling with desperation to the skirts of the retreating muse.
It was an intoxicating trip altogether; the exceeding sense of satisfaction that follows a good dinner added largely to the enjoyment; the having something especial to look forward to and muse about, like the approaching grandeurs of Meiringen, sharpened the zest.
Rebecca, Adam thought, as he took off his hat and saluted the pretty panorama,--Rebecca, with her tall slenderness, her thoughtful brow, the fire of young joy in her face, her fillet of dark braided hair, might have been a young Muse or Sibyl; and the flowery hayrack, with its freight of blooming girlhood, might have been painted as an allegorical picture of The Morning of Life.
No,' she repeated, and continued sauntering on, pausing at intervals to muse over a bit of moss, or a tuft of blanched grass, or a fungus spreading its bright orange among the heaps of brown foliage; and, ever and anon, her hand was lifted to her averted face.
Wordsworth made the country, but Lamb made the town; and there is quite a band of poets nowadays who share his distaste for mountains, and take London for their muse.
Of Mans First Disobedience, and the Fruit Of that Forbidden Tree, whose mortal tast Brought Death into the World, and all our woe, With loss of EDEN, till one greater Man Restore us, and regain the blissful Seat, Sing Heav'nly Muse, that on the secret top Of OREB, or of SINAI, didst inspire That Shepherd, who first taught the chosen Seed, In the Beginning how the Heav'ns and Earth Rose out of CHAOS: Or if SION Hill Delight thee more, and SILOA'S Brook that flow'd Fast by the Oracle of God; I thence Invoke thy aid to my adventrous Song, That with no middle flight intends to soar Above th' AONIAN Mount, while it pursues Things unattempted yet in Prose or Rhime.
whose Muse so often tantalizes with fragments which indicate
Dick found him one day at the receipt of custom, rapidly painting a pair of hens and a cock in a little water-colour sketching box, and now and then glancing at the ceiling like a man who should seek inspiration from the muse.
How often did he muse over it and pronounce the name of a dear friend -- a friend lost to him forever; and on his death-bed, when the near approach of eternity seemed to have illumined his mind with supernatural light, this thought, which had until then been but a doubt, became a conviction, and his last words were, `Maximilian, it was Edmond Dantes
Tell me, O Muse, of that ingenious hero who travelled far and wide after he had sacked the famous town of Troy.
She had selected "Paradise Lost" from her shelf of classics, thinking, I suppose, the religious character of the book best adapted it to Sunday; I told her to begin at the beginning, and while she read Milton's invocation to that heavenly muse, who on the "secret top of Oreb or Sinai" had taught the Hebrew shepherd how in the womb of chaos, the conception of a world had originated and ripened, I enjoyed, undisturbed, the treble pleasure of having her near me, hearing the sound of her voice--a sound sweet and satisfying in my ear--and looking, by intervals, at her face: of this last privilege, I chiefly availed myself when I found fault with an intonation, a pause, or an emphasis; as long as I dogmatized, I might also gaze, without exciting too warm a flush.