muster in


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Related to muster in: pass muster

mus·ter

 (mŭs′tər)
v. mus·tered, mus·ter·ing, mus·ters
v.tr.
1. To call (troops) together, as for inspection.
2. To cause to come together; gather: Bring all the volunteers you can muster.
3. To bring into existence or readiness; summon up: mustering up her strength for the ordeal. See Synonyms at call.
v.intr.
To assemble or gather: mustering for inspection.
n.
1.
a. A gathering, especially of troops, for service, inspection, review, or roll call.
b. The persons assembled for such a gathering.
2. A muster roll.
3. A gathering or collection: a muster of business leaders at a luncheon.
4. A flock of peacocks.
Phrasal Verbs:
muster in
To enlist or be enlisted in military service: She mustered in at the age of 18.
muster out
To discharge or be discharged from military service: He was mustered out when the war ended.
Idiom:
pass muster
To be judged as acceptable.

[Middle English mustren, from Old French moustrer, from Latin mōnstrāre, to show, from mōnstrum, sign, portent, from monēre, to warn; see men- in Indo-European roots.]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.muster in - engage somebody to enter the army
levy, recruit, raise - cause to assemble or enlist in the military; "raise an army"; "recruit new soldiers"
enrol, enroll, recruit, inscribe, enter - register formally as a participant or member; "The party recruited many new members"

muster

verb
1. To assemble, prepare, or put into operation, as for war or a similar emergency:
3. To demand to appear, come, or assemble:
phrasal verb
muster in
To become a member of:
Informal: sign on.
phrasal verb
muster out
To release from military duty:
noun
A number of persons who have come or been gathered together:
Informal: get-together.
Translations

w>muster in

vt sep (US) troops, recruitseinziehen
References in periodicals archive ?
and Mexico crawl slowly toward an immigration treaty that will pass muster in Washington, many American communities have rushed ahead, agreeing to accept cards called matriculas, issued by Mexican consulates to Mexican citizens, as legitimate rns.
Theirs was a kitchen-sink approach, in which prosecutors appeared to toss up all the arguments they could muster in a last-ditch attempt to convince an unwilling Senate to end Clinton's presidency.
Will ice-cool Thomas pass Muster in the royal romance stakes?