mutinous


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Related to mutinous: accurst, unyoking

mu·ti·nous

 (myo͞ot′n-əs)
adj.
1. Of, engaged in, disposed to, or constituting mutiny. See Synonyms at insubordinate.
2. Unruly; disaffected: a mutinous child.
3. Turbulent and uncontrollable: "mutinous passions, and conflicting fears" (Percy Bysshe Shelley).

[From obsolete mutine, mutiny; see mutiny.]

mu′ti·nous·ly adv.
mu′ti·nous·ness n.

mutinous

(ˈmjuːtɪnəs)
adj
1. openly rebellious or disobedient: a mutinous child.
2. characteristic or indicative of mutiny
ˈmutinously adv
ˈmutinousness n

mu•ti•nous

(ˈmyut n əs)

adj.
1. disposed to or engaged in revolt against authority.
2. characterized by mutiny; rebellious.
3. difficult to control: mutinous feelings.
[1570–80; obsolete mutine mutiny + -ous]
mu′ti•nous•ly, adv.
mu′ti•nous•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.mutinous - disposed to or in a state of mutiny; "the men became mutinous and insubordinate"
insubordinate - not submissive to authority; "a history of insubordinate behavior"; "insubordinate boys"
2.mutinous - consisting of or characterized by or inciting to mutiny; "mutinous acts"; "mutinous thoughts"; "a mutinous speech"
disloyal - deserting your allegiance or duty to leader or cause or principle; "disloyal aides revealed his indiscretions to the papers"

mutinous

mutinous

adjective
Participating in open revolt against a government or ruling authority:
Translations
مَيّال إلى التَّمَرُّد
vzpurný
uppreisnargjarn
búriaci sa

mutinous

[ˈmjuːtɪnəs] ADJ (lit) → amotinado (fig) → rebelde
we were feeling pretty mutinousestábamos hartos ya, estábamos dispuestos a rebelarnos

mutinous

[ˈmjuːtɪnəs] adj
[troops] → mutiné(e)
[attitude, feelings] → rebelle

mutinous

adj (Naut) → meuterisch, aufrührerisch; (fig)rebellisch

mutinous

[ˈmjuːtɪnəs] adj (sailor, troops) → ammutinato/a; (attitude) → ribelle

mutiny

(ˈmjuːtini) plural ˈmutinies noun
(a) refusal to obey one's senior officers in the navy or other armed services. There has been a mutiny on HMS Tigress; The sailors were found guilty of mutiny.
verb
(of sailors etc) to refuse to obey commands from those in authority. The sailors mutinied because they did not have enough food.
mutiˈneer noun
a person who mutinies.
ˈmutinous adjective
mutinous sailors.
References in classic literature ?
Then Gabriel shrieked out to his comrades to give way with their oars, and in that manner the mutinous boat rapidly shot away from the Pequod.
He had a secret which he was not ready to tell, yet, but if this mutinous depression was not broken up soon, he would have to bring it out.
There was a mutinous leap of the heart then, a beating of wings against the door of the cage, a longing for the freedom of the big world outside.
He walked up hill in the mire by the side of the mail, as the rest of the passengers did; not because they had the least relish for walking exercise, under the circumstances, but because the hill, and the harness, and the mud, and the mail, were all so heavy, that the horses had three times already come to a stop, besides once drawing the coach across the road, with the mutinous intent of taking it back to Blackheath.
In that supreme crisis of the empire and a human soul, when the mutinous soldiers were thronging about the royal tent and clamouring for the blood of the favourite, it was the Emperor who sent her forth -- lily pale,
It would have been dangerous, however, to continue much longer at sea with such a crew of mutinous sailors; and, besides, the Rose Algier was leaky and unseaworthy.
The same strung-up force which had given twenty-four men a chance, at least, for their lives, had, in a sort of recoil, crushed an unworthy mutinous existence.
But presently Dent brings up a poor fellow who has killed a hare, and when I've got through my 'justicing,' as Carroll calls it, I'm inclined for a ride round the glebe, and on my way back I meet with the master of the workhouse, who has got a long story of a mutinous pauper to tell me; and so the day goes on, and I'm always the same lazy fellow before evening sets in.
Of course the Irish regiments in India are half mutinous as they stand.
In that amphibious community there was always a propensity to wrest the laws in favor of riotous or mutinous boatmen.
Three weeks later, Colonel Creighton, pricing Tibetan ghost-daggers at Lurgan's shop, faced Mahbub Ali openly mutinous.
You may be quite sure that he reached the culminating point of his happiness three days before he saw the New World with his actual eves, when his mutinous sailors wanted to tack about, and return to Europe