mutinous

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mu·ti·nous

 (myo͞ot′n-əs)
adj.
1. Of, engaged in, disposed to, or constituting mutiny. See Synonyms at insubordinate.
2. Unruly; disaffected: a mutinous child.
3. Turbulent and uncontrollable: "mutinous passions, and conflicting fears" (Percy Bysshe Shelley).

[From obsolete mutine, mutiny; see mutiny.]

mu′ti·nous·ly adv.
mu′ti·nous·ness n.

mutinous

(ˈmjuːtɪnəs)
adj
1. openly rebellious or disobedient: a mutinous child.
2. characteristic or indicative of mutiny
ˈmutinously adv
ˈmutinousness n

mu•ti•nous

(ˈmyut n əs)

adj.
1. disposed to or engaged in revolt against authority.
2. characterized by mutiny; rebellious.
3. difficult to control: mutinous feelings.
[1570–80; obsolete mutine mutiny + -ous]
mu′ti•nous•ly, adv.
mu′ti•nous•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.mutinous - disposed to or in a state of mutiny; "the men became mutinous and insubordinate"
insubordinate - not submissive to authority; "a history of insubordinate behavior"; "insubordinate boys"
2.mutinous - consisting of or characterized by or inciting to mutiny; "mutinous acts"; "mutinous thoughts"; "a mutinous speech"
disloyal - deserting your allegiance or duty to leader or cause or principle; "disloyal aides revealed his indiscretions to the papers"

mutinous

mutinous

adjective
Participating in open revolt against a government or ruling authority:
Translations
مَيّال إلى التَّمَرُّد
vzpurný
uppreisnargjarn
búriaci sa

mutinous

[ˈmjuːtɪnəs] ADJ (lit) → amotinado (fig) → rebelde
we were feeling pretty mutinousestábamos hartos ya, estábamos dispuestos a rebelarnos

mutinous

[ˈmjuːtɪnəs] adj
[troops] → mutiné(e)
[attitude, feelings] → rebelle

mutinous

adj (Naut) → meuterisch, aufrührerisch; (fig)rebellisch

mutinous

[ˈmjuːtɪnəs] adj (sailor, troops) → ammutinato/a; (attitude) → ribelle

mutiny

(ˈmjuːtini) plural ˈmutinies noun
(a) refusal to obey one's senior officers in the navy or other armed services. There has been a mutiny on HMS Tigress; The sailors were found guilty of mutiny.
verb
(of sailors etc) to refuse to obey commands from those in authority. The sailors mutinied because they did not have enough food.
mutiˈneer noun
a person who mutinies.
ˈmutinous adjective
mutinous sailors.
References in classic literature ?
Instead, he became angry, and showed it; he said two or three quite nasty things; Anne's temper flashed up mutinously and she retorted with a cutting little speech whose keenness pierced even Charlie's protective Sloanishness and reached the quick; he caught up his hat and flung himself out of the house with a very red face; Anne rushed upstairs, falling twice over Miss Ada's cushions on the way, and threw herself on her bed, in tears of humiliation and rage.
He shook his head mutinously, and the cloudy deeps of his eyes grew more cloudy.
But the second declared mutinously that he didn't care a rap who was on the other side of the bridge, and Jukes, passing in a flash from lofty disapproval into a state of exaltation, invited him in unflattering terms to come up and twist the beastly things to please himself, and catch such wind as a donkey of his sort could find.
In spite of its defiant title, "Not in my language," mutinously followed up by an electric-blue neon sign reminding entering visitors that THE Fist Is Still Up (a work ironically titled Safe Space, 2014), Wu Tsang's European institutional debut was an accessible best-of sampler.
Attack, attack, attack" they mutinously yelled, rapidly followed by sustained chants of "4-4-2".