mutualism

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Related to mutualistic: Symbiotic Relationships

mu·tu·al·ism

 (myo͞o′cho͞o-ə-lĭz′əm)
n.
An association between two organisms of different species in which each member benefits.

mu′tu·al·ist n.
mu′tu·al·is′tic adj.

mutualism

(ˈmjuːtʃʊəˌlɪzəm)
n
(Biology) another name for symbiosis
ˈmutualist n, adj
ˌmutualˈistic adj

mu•tu•al•ism

(ˈmyu tʃu əˌlɪz əm)

n.
a relationship between two species of organisms in which both benefit from the association.
[1860–65]
mu′tu•al•ist, n.
mu`tu•al•is′tic, adj.

mu·tu·al·ism

(myo͞o′cho͞o-ə-lĭz′əm)
A symbiotic relationship between two organisms of different species in which each member benefits. See Note at symbiosis.

mutualism

the living together of two organisms in a mutually beneficial relationship.
See also: Biology
the principle or practice of mutual dependence as the condition of individual and social welfare. — mutualist, n.
See also: Behavior
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.mutualism - the relation between two different species of organisms that are interdependent; each gains benefits from the other
interdependence, interdependency, mutuality - a reciprocal relation between interdependent entities (objects or individuals or groups)
trophobiosis - a symbiotic relation in which one organism protects the other in return for some kind of food product
Translations

mutualism

[ˈmjuːtjʊəˌlɪzm] nsimbiosi f mutualistica
References in periodicals archive ?
The zebra--besides, as they note wryly, actually existing--offers some other elements that make it actually sustainable, in every sense of the word: a zebra company seeks both to be profitable and to benefit society; like its namesake, it is mutualistic, seeking ways to collaborate with other organizations to create value; and it is "built with peerless stamina and capital efficiency.
These relationships are mainly mutualistic where both the ants and aphids benefit.
Few studies have examined the role that personality plays in shaping interactions between species, especially mutualistic interactions.
We aim to understand the mechanistic role of learnt traits in the origin and maintenance of mutualistic interactions between species, and to test their evolutionary and ecological consequences.
While some orchids rely on fungi only during the early stages of life, numerous species keep the mutualistic association going throughout the entirety of their lives.
pisciphila could well form mutualistic association with sorghum.
When the algae emit the chemical, they're "engaging in sort of a mutualistic interaction," said Matthew Savoca, a PhD student at UC Davis and the study's lead author.
So, we find parasites as a sort of necessary evil that can do both good and bad and represent mutualistic relationships even, like the worm called Euhaplorchis californiensis (originating in Southern California waters).
chrysura, vibrations produced by nearby egg - guarding females as a response to predators and parasitoids, may provide a mutualistic advantage that favors oviposition in close proximity to other guarding females.
The mutualistic relationship is unlikely to crack anytime soon.
Different field and laboratory experiments reveal that many EPNs species, for example Heterorhabditis bacteriophora have the mutualistic association with other bio control agent like Beauveria bassiana.
Referring to their coexistence in mutualistic symbiosis, Iosif contends