mutualism

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Related to mutualistic: Symbiotic Relationships

mu·tu·al·ism

 (myo͞o′cho͞o-ə-lĭz′əm)
n.
An association between two organisms of different species in which each member benefits.

mu′tu·al·ist n.
mu′tu·al·is′tic adj.

mutualism

(ˈmjuːtʃʊəˌlɪzəm)
n
(Biology) another name for symbiosis
ˈmutualist n, adj
ˌmutualˈistic adj

mu•tu•al•ism

(ˈmyu tʃu əˌlɪz əm)

n.
a relationship between two species of organisms in which both benefit from the association.
[1860–65]
mu′tu•al•ist, n.
mu`tu•al•is′tic, adj.

mu·tu·al·ism

(myo͞o′cho͞o-ə-lĭz′əm)
A symbiotic relationship between two organisms of different species in which each member benefits. See Note at symbiosis.

mutualism

the living together of two organisms in a mutually beneficial relationship.
See also: Biology
the principle or practice of mutual dependence as the condition of individual and social welfare. — mutualist, n.
See also: Behavior
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.mutualism - the relation between two different species of organisms that are interdependent; each gains benefits from the other
interdependence, interdependency, mutuality - a reciprocal relation between interdependent entities (objects or individuals or groups)
trophobiosis - a symbiotic relation in which one organism protects the other in return for some kind of food product
Translations

mutualism

[ˈmjuːtjʊəˌlɪzm] nsimbiosi f mutualistica
References in periodicals archive ?
That unionistic and mutualistic transformation might results in more beneficial, supportive, consolidating and solidarity spirit among the integrateable territories of the Nile Basin.
9,10) Further research is currently being performed on P acnes in regards to both its mutualistic and parasitic properties.
2005) for references and additional examples), and there are also ant species that herd, protect, and breed mutualistic aphids and other homopterans (Holldolber & Wilson, 1990; Schultz & McGlynn, 2000).
To this end, we will apply in vivo experimental evolution to mutualistic bacteria, using gnotobiotic animal models.
Generally, the relationship is mutualistic with the fungi receiving sugars and the plants benefiting from increased uptake of nutrients and water.
Most legumes have the ability to establish mutualistic symbiotic relationships with soil N-fixing bacteria (collectively known as rhizobia) and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi.
The last stage includes the symbionts of the photosynthetic sporophytes that are assumed to have a mutualistic relationship with the host sporophytes.
Multi-strain probiotic supplements have demonstrated reduced antibiotic-associated diarrhoea compared with the use of a single-strain probiotic supplement, with suggestion that the mutualistic relationship between probiotic strains may confer additive beneficial health effects.
Honeydew is a sugary excretion of carbohydrates, amino acids, and water that attracts ants to establish a mutualistic association.
Tall fescue and associated mutualistic toxic fungal endophytes in agroecosystems.
mutualistic to pathogenic, parthenogenesis, cytoplasmic incompatibility, selective male killing and feminization (1).
The nitrogen excretion by invertebrates (as demonstrated in Bracken and Nielsen, 2004) is not a likely mechanism for the observed mutualistic interaction demonstrated by the lack of positive generic responses of nutrient addition on the net photosynthetic production of the macroalgal community dominated by C.