myalism

myalism

(ˈmaɪəˌlɪzəm)
n
(Alternative Belief Systems) a kind of witchcraft, similar to obi, practised esp in the Caribbean
[C19: from myal, probably of West African origin]
ˈmyalist n

myalism

a West Indian Negro cult, probably of West African origin, that believes in the Obeah.
See also: Religion
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Margarite Fernandez-Olmos and Lizabeth Paravisini-Gebert write that "the systematic repression of African cultural expressions on the part of the British had forced these practices [like Obeah] underground, and they had ultimately been lost, except in pockets of religious activity like Myalism and the Trinidadian Orisha tradition" (Fernandez-Olmos and Parvisini-Gebert 136).
The first shock I registered was the realization that they looked and acted exactly like certain peasants of Jamaica who give themselves up to the celebrating of a religious sing-dance orgy which is known as Myalism.
Much less frequently are we exposed to the parish's historical contributions and immense cultural richness: the legacy of the Maroons and related attachments to such Africanisms as Kumina, Obeah, or Myalism, together with ongoing and vibrant tales of the invisible, who must often be palliated with offerings of white rum and chicken blood.
First, Caribbean evangelicals were some of the first black Christians to demand separation from white Protestants; second, Afro-Caribbean Christianity was heavily influenced by African-derived myalism, which emphasized the practical benefits of religion rather than the promises of other-worldly salvation offered by more orthodox white churches.
These common themes are found in Haiti's Vodun, Cuba's Lucumi (Lukumi) and Santeria, Jamaica's Kumina (Cumina), Myalism, Pocomania (2) and Revival Zionism, Brazil's Candomble, Nago and Umbanda, Trinidad's Shango, Orisha Worship and Shouters, St.
Thus, obeah, myalism, and even the elder members of the church, are seen to have worked to exert sanctions within the subaltern communities.
In examining how lodges, mutual-aid societies, churches, and, eventually, unions formed the bases for worker resistance to company demands, the author finds contradictions: popular organizations, often linked to neo-African and Afro-Christian religions such as obeah, myalism, and revivalism, allowed the population quickly to mobilize, to overcome inter-island rivalries, and to hold out, if only briefly, against considerable outside pressure.
of Myalism which will take Ella from the dis/ease of Anglo-interpellation, recitation/reproduction, to the health of resistance and recuperation.
Mma Alli as Homer, contest Eurocentric ideological frameworks by asserting an African identity, positioning Africa as motherland, and adhering to Obeahism and Myalism.
African beliefs, in both Myalism and Obeah, were used to address the tribulations of slavery and, give an apparent "disposition to syncretism," (p.