myalism

myalism

(ˈmaɪəˌlɪzəm)
n
(Alternative Belief Systems) a kind of witchcraft, similar to obi, practised esp in the Caribbean
[C19: from myal, probably of West African origin]
ˈmyalist n

myalism

a West Indian Negro cult, probably of West African origin, that believes in the Obeah.
See also: Religion
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References in periodicals archive ?
Much less frequently are we exposed to the parish's historical contributions and immense cultural richness: the legacy of the Maroons and related attachments to such Africanisms as Kumina, Obeah, or Myalism, together with ongoing and vibrant tales of the invisible, who must often be palliated with offerings of white rum and chicken blood.
First, Caribbean evangelicals were some of the first black Christians to demand separation from white Protestants; second, Afro-Caribbean Christianity was heavily influenced by African-derived myalism, which emphasized the practical benefits of religion rather than the promises of other-worldly salvation offered by more orthodox white churches.
Problems like poverty, corruption, illness, and oppression were, many black West Indians believed, the product of sorcery that myalism could eradicate.
These common themes are found in Haiti's Vodun, Cuba's Lucumi (Lukumi) and Santeria, Jamaica's Kumina (Cumina), Myalism, Pocomania (2) and Revival Zionism, Brazil's Candomble, Nago and Umbanda, Trinidad's Shango, Orisha Worship and Shouters, St.
Thus, obeah, myalism, and even the elder members of the church, are seen to have worked to exert sanctions within the subaltern communities.
Myalism and the African religious tradition in Jamaica, in M.
African beliefs, in both Myalism and Obeah, were used to address the tribulations of slavery and, give an apparent "disposition to syncretism," (p.
It is important to note that my research has uncovered no reference to the presence in Cuba of African-based religious forms such as myalism, obeah, and pocomania which were prominent in Jamaica and among British West Indian immigrant populations elsewhere in the Caribbean.
In particular, Afro-Jamaican religious tradition which encompassed Protestant Non-conformism and obeah and myalism - two African-based religious forms which flourished among the slaves, and which was a major factor behind a number of slave and post-slavery rebellions in Jamaica - played a crucial role in labor organizing in Costa Rica.
Obeah and myalism were the two African-based belief systems predominating in Jamaica in the eighteenth century.
Also notable in the contemporary descriptions of both myalism and obeah is the medical importance that they held.