myriad


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myr·i·ad

 (mĭr′ē-əd)
adj.
1. Constituting a very large, indefinite number; innumerable: the myriad fish in the ocean.
2. Composed of numerous diverse elements or facets: the myriad life of the metropolis.
n.
1. A large, indefinite number: a myriad of microorganisms in the pond; myriads of stars in the galaxy.
2. Archaic Ten thousand.

[Greek mūrias, mūriad-, ten thousand, from mūrios, countless.]
Usage Note: Throughout most of its history in English myriad was used as a noun, as in a myriad of reasons. In the 1800s, it began to be used in poetry as an adjective, as in myriad dreams. Both usages in English are acceptable, as in Samuel Taylor Coleridge's "Myriad myriads of lives." This poetic, adjectival use became so well entrenched generally that many people came to consider it as the only correct use. In fact, however, both uses are acceptable today.

myriad

(ˈmɪrɪəd)
adj
innumerable
n
1. (also used in plural) a large indefinite number
2. archaic ten thousand
[C16: via Late Latin from Greek murias ten thousand]

myr•i•ad

(ˈmɪr i əd)

n.
1. an indefinitely great number of persons or things.
2. ten thousand.
adj.
3. of an indefinitely great number; innumerable.
4. having innumerable phases, aspects, variations, etc.
[1545–55; < Greek mȳriad-, s. of mȳriás ten thousand]

Myriad

 a countless mumber of persons, animals, or things; specifically, a group of 10,000.
Examples: myriad eyes, 1830; of horses, 1803; of lambs, 1817; of lives, 1800; of men, 1555; of people, 1660; of precedent, 1860; of sundry cases, 1570.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.myriad - a large indefinite number; "he faced a myriad of details"
large indefinite amount, large indefinite quantity - an indefinite quantity that is above the average in size or magnitude
2.myriad - the cardinal number that is the product of ten and one thousandmyriad - the cardinal number that is the product of ten and one thousand
large integer - an integer equal to or greater than ten
Adj.1.myriad - too numerous to be countedmyriad - too numerous to be counted; "incalculable riches"; "countless hours"; "an infinite number of reasons"; "innumerable difficulties"; "the multitudinous seas"; "myriad stars"; "untold thousands"
incalculable - not capable of being computed or enumerated

myriad

noun
1. multitude, millions, scores, host, thousands, army, sea, mountain, flood, a million, a thousand, swarm, horde They face a myriad of problems bringing up children.
adjective
1. innumerable, countless, untold, incalculable, immeasurable, a thousand and one, multitudinous pop culture in all its myriad forms

myriad

adjective
Amounting to or consisting of a large, indefinite number:
Idiom: quite a few.
Translations
miríada
myriade
loendamatu
lukematonlukematon määrälukuisamyriadisuunnaton määrä
aragrúimýgrúturógrynniótalurmull
een groot aantal
vạn

myriad

[ˈmɪrɪəd] (frm)
A. ADJ a myriad fliesun sinnúmero or una miríada de moscas
B. Nmiríada f
the myriad of problems we facela miríada de problemas a la que nos enfrentamos

myriad

[ˈmɪriəd]
nmyriade f
a myriad of problems → une myriade de problèmes
adj (= countless) → innombrable
in all its myriad forms → sous toutes ses diverses formes

myriad

nMyriade f; a myriad ofMyriaden von
adj (= innumerable)unzählige

myriad

[ˈmɪrɪəd] nmiriade f
References in classic literature ?
It was the color of her skin, without the glow, the myriad living tints that one may sometimes discover in vibrant flesh.
The family was too poor and too hardworked to make many acquaintances; in Packingtown, as a rule, people know only their near neighbors and shopmates, and so the place is like a myriad of little country villages.
By long years of patient industry and reading of the newspapers--for what are the libraries of science but files of newspapers--a man accumulates a myriad facts, lays them up in his memory, and then when in some spring of his life he saunters abroad into the Great Fields of thought, he, as it were, goes to grass like a horse and leaves all his harness behind in the stable.
To him, man was a being with myriad lives and myriad sensations, a complex multiform creature that bore within itself strange legacies of thought and passion, and whose very flesh was tainted with the monstrous maladies of the dead.
The myriad wires of this New York system are tingling with talk every minute of the day and night.
Today we do more than celebrate America, we rededicate ourselves to the very idea of America, an idea born in revolution, and renewed through two centuries of challenge, an idea tempered by the knowledge that but for fate, we, the fortunate and the unfortunate, might have been each other; an idea ennobled by the faith that our nation can summon from its myriad diversity, the deepest measure of unity; an idea infused with the conviction that America's journey long, heroic journey must go forever upward.
As I stood thus meditating, I turned my gaze from the landscape to the heavens where the myriad stars formed a gorgeous and fitting canopy for the wonders of the earthly scene.
Something told him that he would have known that scent among a myriad of others even if Akut had not told him that a lion lay near.
He was interested in everything, and asked me a myriad questions about the place and its surroundings.
The nearer sea was flashing the sun from a myriad facets.
for I have heard How, when the Ch`is and Weis embattled rose Along the frontier, when the Chings and Hans Gathered their multitudes, a myriad leagues Of utter weariness they trod.
By and by, Jason imagined that he could distinguish words, but very confusedly, because each separate leaf of the tree seemed to be a tongue, and the whole myriad of tongues were babbling at once.