mystery

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mys·ter·y 1

 (mĭs′tə-rē)
n. pl. mys·ter·ies
1. One that is not fully understood or that baffles or eludes the understanding; an enigma: How he got in is a mystery.
2. One whose identity is unknown and who arouses curiosity: The woman in the photograph is a mystery.
3. A mysterious character or quality: a landscape with mystery and charm.
4. Something that is a secret: "From the first, some private trouble weighed on his mind, and since he chose to make a mystery of its cause, a biographer is bound to respect his wish" (Henry Adams).
5.
a. A work of fiction, such as a novel or a movie, that has a story centered around solving a puzzling crime or mysterious event.
b. A nonfictional account of a puzzling crime or mysterious event presented in the manner of a mystery.
6.
a. A religious cult practicing secret rites to which only initiates are admitted.
b. A secret rite of such a cult.
7. A religious truth that is incomprehensible to reason and knowable only through divine revelation.
8. Christianity
a. An incident from the life of Jesus, especially the Incarnation, Passion, Crucifixion, or Resurrection, of particular importance for redemption.
b. One of the 15 incidents from the lives of Jesus or the Blessed Virgin Mary, such as the Annunciation or the Ascension, serving in Roman Catholicism as the subject of meditation during recitation of the rosary.
9.
a. also Mystery One of the sacraments, especially the Eucharist.
b. mysteries The consecrated elements of the Eucharist.
10. often mysteries The skills, lore, or practices that are peculiar to a particular activity or group and are regarded as the special province of initiates: the mysteries of Freemasonry; the mysteries of cooking game.
11. A mystery play.

[Middle English misterie, from Latin mystērium, from Greek mustērion, secret rite, from mustēs, an initiate, from mūein, to close the eyes, initiate. Senses 8, 9, and perhaps 10, partly from Middle English misterie, occupation, craft-guild; see mystery2.]

mys·ter·y 2

 (mĭs′tə-rē)
n. pl. mys·ter·ies Archaic
1. A trade or occupation.
2. A guild, as of merchants or artisans.

[Middle English misterie, from Medieval Latin misterium, alteration (influenced by Latin mystērium, secret rite) of Latin ministerium, from minister, assistant, servant; see mei- in Indo-European roots.]

mystery

(ˈmɪstərɪ; -trɪ)
n, pl -teries
1. an unexplained or inexplicable event, phenomenon, etc
2. a person or thing that arouses curiosity or suspense because of an unknown, obscure, or enigmatic quality
3. the state or quality of being obscure, inexplicable, or enigmatic
4. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) a story, film, etc, which arouses suspense and curiosity because of facts concealed
5. (Ecclesiastical Terms) Christianity any truth that is divinely revealed but otherwise unknowable
6. (Theology) Christianity a sacramental rite, such as the Eucharist, or (when plural) the consecrated elements of the Eucharist
7. (Other Non-Christian Religions) (often plural) any of various rites of certain ancient Mediterranean religions
8. (Theatre) short for mystery play
[C14: via Latin from Greek mustērion secret rites. See mystic]

mystery

(ˈmɪstərɪ)
n, pl -teries
1. (Professions) a trade, occupation, or craft
2. (Crafts) a guild of craftsmen
[C14: from Medieval Latin mistērium, from Latin ministerium occupation, from minister official]

mys•ter•y1

(ˈmɪs tə ri, -tri)

n., pl. -ter•ies.
1. anything that is kept secret or remains unexplained or unknown: the mysteries of nature.
2. a person or thing having qualities that arouse curiosity or speculation: The masked guest was a mystery to everyone.
3. a novel, film, or the like whose plot involves the solving of a puzzle, esp. a crime.
4. the quality of being obscure or puzzling: an air of mystery.
5. any truth unknowable except by divine revelation.
6. (in the Christian religion)
a. a sacramental rite.
b. the Eucharist.
7. an incident or scene in the life or passion of Christ, or in the life of the Virgin Mary.
8. mysteries,
a. ancient religions with secret rites and rituals known only to initiates.
b. any rites or secrets known only to initiates.
c. (in the Christian religion) the Eucharistic elements.
[1275–1325; Middle English < Latin mystērium < Greek mystḗrion=mýs(tēs) (see mystic) + -tērion n. suffix]

mys•ter•y2

(ˈmɪs tə ri)

n., pl. -ter•ies. Archaic.
1. a craft or trade.
2. a guild, as of merchants.
[1325–75; « Latin ministerium ministry]

mystery

  • bags of mystery - Slang for sausage.
  • mystery - Traces back to Greek mustikos, "secret," and musterion, "secret rites"; the lesser-known meaning of mystery as "handicraft; art" is part of the phrase "mystery play."
  • mystify - Derived from mystery or mystic.
  • rune - An ancient alphabet letter, it is from Old English run, "secret, mystery."
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.mystery - something that baffles understanding and cannot be explainedmystery - something that baffles understanding and cannot be explained; "how it got out is a mystery"; "it remains one of nature's secrets"
perplexity - trouble or confusion resulting from complexity
2.mystery - a story about a crime (usually murder) presented as a novel or play or moviemystery - a story about a crime (usually murder) presented as a novel or play or movie
story - a piece of fiction that narrates a chain of related events; "he writes stories for the magazines"
detective story - a narrative about someone who investigates crimes and obtains evidence leading to their resolution
murder mystery - a narrative about a murder and how the murderer is discovered

mystery

noun
1. puzzle, problem, question, secret, riddle, enigma, conundrum, teaser, poser (informal), closed book The source of the gunshots still remains a mystery.
2. secrecy, uncertainty, obscurity, mystique, darkness, ambiguity, ambiguousness It is an elaborate ceremony, shrouded in mystery.

mystery

noun
Anything that arouses curiosity or perplexes because it is unexplained, inexplicable, or secret:
Translations
سِر، غُموضشَيءٌ غامِضغُمُوضٌ
záhadatajemství
mysteriummystikgåde
راز
arvoitussalaisuus
misterij
rejtély
leynd, ráîgátaleyndardómur, ráîgáta
신비
mysterium
mįslingumaspaslaptingaipaslaptingaspaslaptingumaspaslaptis
brīnumsmīklanoslēpums
mister
záhada
skrivnost
mysterium
ความลึกลับ
điều huyền bí

mystery

[ˈmɪstərɪ]
A. N
1. (gen, Rel) → misterio m
there's no mystery about itno tiene ningún misterio
to make a great mystery out of a matterrodear un asunto con un halo de misterio
it's a mystery to me where it can have goneno entiendo dónde puede haberse metido
it's a mystery how I lost itno entiendo cómo lo pude perder
2. (Literat) (also mystery story) → novela f de misterio
3. (Rel, Theat) (also mystery play) → auto m sacramental, misterio m
B. CPD mystery man Nhombre m misterioso
mystery play Nauto m sacramental, misterio m
mystery ship Nbuque m misterioso
mystery story Nnovela f de misterio
mystery tour, mystery trip Nviaje m sorpresa

mystery

[ˈmɪstəri]
nmystère m
to be a mystery → être un mystère
to remain a mystery → rester mystérieux/euse
to be shrouded in mystery → être enveloppé(e) de mystère murder mystery
modif [buyer, guest] → mystérieux/eusemystery story nroman m à suspense

mystery

n (= puzzle)Rätsel nt; (= secret)Geheimnis nt; to be shrouded or surrounded in mysteryvon einem Geheimnis umwittert or umgeben sein; there’s no mystery about itda ist überhaupt nichts Geheimnisvolles dabei; it’s a mystery to medas ist mir schleierhaft or ein Rätsel; don’t make a great mystery of it!mach doch kein so großes Geheimnis daraus!; why all the mystery?was soll denn die Geheimnistuerei?

mystery

:
mystery caller
nTestanrufer(in) m(f)
mystery calling
nTestanruf m
mystery model
n (Aut) → Erlkönig m (fig)
mystery monger
nGeheimniskrämer(in) m(f)
mystery novel
mystery play
mystery shopper
nTestkäufer(in) m(f)
mystery shopping
nTestkauf m
mystery story
nKriminalgeschichte f, → Krimi m (inf)
mystery tour
nFahrt fins Blaue; a mystery of the Black Foresteine Entdeckungsreise durch den Schwarzwald
mystery visitor
nTestbesucher(in) m(f)
mystery writer
nKriminalschriftsteller(in) m(f)

mystery

[ˈmɪstrɪ]
1. nmistero
it's a mystery to me where it can have gone → dove sia finito (per me) è un mistero
2. adj (man, woman) → misterioso/a

mystery

(ˈmistəri) plural ˈmysteries noun
1. something that cannot be, or has not been, explained. the mystery of how the universe was formed; the mystery of his disappearance; How she passed her exam is a mystery to me.
2. the quality of being impossible to explain, understand etc. Her death was surrounded by mystery.
myˈsterious (-ˈstiəriəs) adjective
difficult to understand or explain, or full of mystery. mysterious happenings; He's being very mysterious (= refuses to explain fully) about what his work is
myˈsteriously adverb

mystery

غُمُوضٌ záhada mysterium Geheimnis μυστήριο misterio arvoitus mystère misterij mistero 신비 mysterie mysterium tajemniczość mistério тайна mysterium ความลึกลับ gizem điều huyền bí 神秘
References in classic literature ?
Troy, whose practice as a solicitor had thus far never brought him into collision with thieves and mysteries.
You will see that the mysteries which the police discover are, almost without exception, mysteries made penetrable by the commonest capacity, through the extraordinary stupidity exhibited in the means taken to hide the crime.
In these cases the whole plays become vivid studies in contemporary low life, largely human and interesting except for their prolixity and the coarseness which they inherited from the Mysteries and multiplied on their own account.
With its jagged outline it is like a Monseratt of the Pacific, and you may imagine that there Polynesian knights guard with strange rites mysteries unholy for men to know.
The subject had reference to secret sin, and those sad mysteries which we hide from our nearest and dearest, and would fain conceal from our own consciousness, even forgetting that the Omniscient can detect them.
Found in a Bottle," "A Descent Into a Maelstrom" and "The Balloon Hoax"; such tales of conscience as "William Wilson," "The Black Cat" and "The Tell-tale Heart," wherein the retributions of remorse are portrayed with an awful fidelity; such tales of natural beauty as "The Island of the Fay" and "The Domain of Arnheim"; such marvellous studies in ratiocination as the "Gold-bug," "The Murders in the Rue Morgue," "The Purloined Letter" and "The Mystery of Marie Roget," the latter, a recital of fact, demonstrating the author's wonderful capability of correctly analyzing the mysteries of the human mind; such tales of illusion and banter as "The Premature Burial" and "The System of Dr.
His first thought when he had made Professor Maxon comfortable upon the couch was to fetch his pet nostrum, for there burned strong within his yellow breast the same powerful yearning to experiment that marks the greatest of the profession to whose mysteries he aspired.
Jerry quivered at first, and in the matter of a minute struggled feebly to his feet where he stood swaying and dizzy; and thus Bashti, his eye to the crack, saw the miracle of life flow back through the channels of the inert body and stiffen the legs to upstanding, and saw consciousness, the mystery of mysteries, flood back inside the head of bone that was covered with hair, smoulder and glow in the opening eyes, and direct the lips to writhe away from the teeth and the throat to vibrate to the snarl that had been interrupted when the stick smashed him down into darkness.
It is high time that I should pass from these brief and discursive notes about things in Flatland to the central event of this book, my initiation into the mysteries of Space.
Her popular mystery series include the Chloe and Levesque Mysteries, the Robyn Hunter Mysteries, the Mike and Riel Mysteries and the Ryan Dooley Mysteries.
Lastly, Boracay Mystery Manila offers four different mysteries waiting to be solved -- Villainous Vault, The Chained Chamber, Aztec Adventure, and last but not the least is the exciting Tainted Treasure.
Where Chesterton's Father Brown mysteries are "Christian" primarily because their main character is a Catholic Priest who explores ideas as much as events, Williams's mystery is one because it engages not only the elements of the mystery story, but also the mysteries of Christianity.