mystery


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mys·ter·y 1

 (mĭs′tə-rē)
n. pl. mys·ter·ies
1. One that is not fully understood or that baffles or eludes the understanding; an enigma: How he got in is a mystery.
2. One whose identity is unknown and who arouses curiosity: The woman in the photograph is a mystery.
3. A mysterious character or quality: a landscape with mystery and charm.
4. A work of fiction, a drama, or a film dealing with a puzzling crime.
5.
a. A religious cult practicing secret rites to which only initiates are admitted.
b. A secret rite of such a cult.
6. A religious truth that is incomprehensible to reason and knowable only through divine revelation.
7. Christianity
a. An incident from the life of Jesus, especially the Incarnation, Passion, Crucifixion, or Resurrection, of particular importance for redemption.
b. One of the 15 incidents from the lives of Jesus or the Blessed Virgin Mary, such as the Annunciation or the Ascension, serving in Roman Catholicism as the subject of meditation during recitation of the rosary.
8.
a. also Mystery One of the sacraments, especially the Eucharist.
b. mysteries The consecrated elements of the Eucharist.
9. often mysteries The skills, lore, or practices that are peculiar to a particular activity or group and are regarded as the special province of initiates: the mysteries of Freemasonry; the mysteries of cooking game.
10. A mystery play.

[Middle English misterie, from Latin mystērium, from Greek mustērion, secret rite, from mustēs, an initiate, from mūein, to close the eyes, initiate. Senses 8, 9, and perhaps 10, partly from Middle English misterie, occupation, craft-guild; see mystery2.]

mys·ter·y 2

 (mĭs′tə-rē)
n. pl. mys·ter·ies Archaic
1. A trade or occupation.
2. A guild, as of merchants or artisans.

[Middle English misterie, from Medieval Latin misterium, alteration (influenced by Latin mystērium, secret rite) of Latin ministerium, from minister, assistant, servant; see mei- in Indo-European roots.]

mystery

(ˈmɪstərɪ; -trɪ)
n, pl -teries
1. an unexplained or inexplicable event, phenomenon, etc
2. a person or thing that arouses curiosity or suspense because of an unknown, obscure, or enigmatic quality
3. the state or quality of being obscure, inexplicable, or enigmatic
4. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) a story, film, etc, which arouses suspense and curiosity because of facts concealed
5. (Ecclesiastical Terms) Christianity any truth that is divinely revealed but otherwise unknowable
6. (Theology) Christianity a sacramental rite, such as the Eucharist, or (when plural) the consecrated elements of the Eucharist
7. (Other Non-Christian Religions) (often plural) any of various rites of certain ancient Mediterranean religions
8. (Theatre) short for mystery play
[C14: via Latin from Greek mustērion secret rites. See mystic]

mystery

(ˈmɪstərɪ)
n, pl -teries
1. (Professions) a trade, occupation, or craft
2. (Crafts) a guild of craftsmen
[C14: from Medieval Latin mistērium, from Latin ministerium occupation, from minister official]

mys•ter•y1

(ˈmɪs tə ri, -tri)

n., pl. -ter•ies.
1. anything that is kept secret or remains unexplained or unknown: the mysteries of nature.
2. a person or thing having qualities that arouse curiosity or speculation: The masked guest was a mystery to everyone.
3. a novel, film, or the like whose plot involves the solving of a puzzle, esp. a crime.
4. the quality of being obscure or puzzling: an air of mystery.
5. any truth unknowable except by divine revelation.
6. (in the Christian religion)
a. a sacramental rite.
b. the Eucharist.
7. an incident or scene in the life or passion of Christ, or in the life of the Virgin Mary.
8. mysteries,
a. ancient religions with secret rites and rituals known only to initiates.
b. any rites or secrets known only to initiates.
c. (in the Christian religion) the Eucharistic elements.
[1275–1325; Middle English < Latin mystērium < Greek mystḗrion=mýs(tēs) (see mystic) + -tērion n. suffix]

mys•ter•y2

(ˈmɪs tə ri)

n., pl. -ter•ies. Archaic.
1. a craft or trade.
2. a guild, as of merchants.
[1325–75; « Latin ministerium ministry]

mystery

  • bags of mystery - Slang for sausage.
  • mystery - Traces back to Greek mustikos, "secret," and musterion, "secret rites"; the lesser-known meaning of mystery as "handicraft; art" is part of the phrase "mystery play."
  • mystify - Derived from mystery or mystic.
  • rune - An ancient alphabet letter, it is from Old English run, "secret, mystery."
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.mystery - something that baffles understanding and cannot be explainedmystery - something that baffles understanding and cannot be explained; "how it got out is a mystery"; "it remains one of nature's secrets"
perplexity - trouble or confusion resulting from complexity
2.mystery - a story about a crime (usually murder) presented as a novel or play or moviemystery - a story about a crime (usually murder) presented as a novel or play or movie
story - a piece of fiction that narrates a chain of related events; "he writes stories for the magazines"
detective story - a narrative about someone who investigates crimes and obtains evidence leading to their resolution
murder mystery - a narrative about a murder and how the murderer is discovered

mystery

noun
1. puzzle, problem, question, secret, riddle, enigma, conundrum, teaser, poser (informal), closed book The source of the gunshots still remains a mystery.
2. secrecy, uncertainty, obscurity, mystique, darkness, ambiguity, ambiguousness It is an elaborate ceremony, shrouded in mystery.

mystery

noun
Anything that arouses curiosity or perplexes because it is unexplained, inexplicable, or secret:
Translations
سِر، غُموضشَيءٌ غامِضغُمُوضٌ
záhadatajemství
mysteriummystikgåde
راز
arvoitussalaisuus
misterij
rejtély
leynd, ráîgátaleyndardómur, ráîgáta
신비
mysterium
mįslingumaspaslaptingaipaslaptingaspaslaptingumaspaslaptis
brīnumsmīklanoslēpums
mister
záhada
skrivnost
mysterium
ความลึกลับ
điều huyền bí

mystery

[ˈmɪstərɪ]
A. N
1. (gen, Rel) → misterio m
there's no mystery about itno tiene ningún misterio
to make a great mystery out of a matterrodear un asunto con un halo de misterio
it's a mystery to me where it can have goneno entiendo dónde puede haberse metido
it's a mystery how I lost itno entiendo cómo lo pude perder
2. (Literat) (also mystery story) → novela f de misterio
3. (Rel, Theat) (also mystery play) → auto m sacramental, misterio m
B. CPD mystery man Nhombre m misterioso
mystery play Nauto m sacramental, misterio m
mystery ship Nbuque m misterioso
mystery story Nnovela f de misterio
mystery tour, mystery trip Nviaje m sorpresa

mystery

[ˈmɪstəri]
nmystère m
to be a mystery → être un mystère
to remain a mystery → rester mystérieux/euse
to be shrouded in mystery → être enveloppé(e) de mystère murder mystery
modif [buyer, guest] → mystérieux/eusemystery story nroman m à suspense

mystery

n (= puzzle)Rätsel nt; (= secret)Geheimnis nt; to be shrouded or surrounded in mysteryvon einem Geheimnis umwittert or umgeben sein; there’s no mystery about itda ist überhaupt nichts Geheimnisvolles dabei; it’s a mystery to medas ist mir schleierhaft or ein Rätsel; don’t make a great mystery of it!mach doch kein so großes Geheimnis daraus!; why all the mystery?was soll denn die Geheimnistuerei?

mystery

:
mystery caller
nTestanrufer(in) m(f)
mystery calling
nTestanruf m
mystery model
n (Aut) → Erlkönig m (fig)
mystery monger
nGeheimniskrämer(in) m(f)
mystery novel
mystery play
mystery shopper
nTestkäufer(in) m(f)
mystery shopping
nTestkauf m
mystery story
nKriminalgeschichte f, → Krimi m (inf)
mystery tour
nFahrt fins Blaue; a mystery of the Black Foresteine Entdeckungsreise durch den Schwarzwald
mystery visitor
nTestbesucher(in) m(f)
mystery writer
nKriminalschriftsteller(in) m(f)

mystery

[ˈmɪstrɪ]
1. nmistero
it's a mystery to me where it can have gone → dove sia finito (per me) è un mistero
2. adj (man, woman) → misterioso/a

mystery

(ˈmistəri) plural ˈmysteries noun
1. something that cannot be, or has not been, explained. the mystery of how the universe was formed; the mystery of his disappearance; How she passed her exam is a mystery to me.
2. the quality of being impossible to explain, understand etc. Her death was surrounded by mystery.
myˈsterious (-ˈstiəriəs) adjective
difficult to understand or explain, or full of mystery. mysterious happenings; He's being very mysterious (= refuses to explain fully) about what his work is
myˈsteriously adverb

mystery

غُمُوضٌ záhada mysterium Geheimnis μυστήριο misterio arvoitus mystère misterij mistero 신비 mysterie mysterium tajemniczość mistério тайна mysterium ความลึกลับ gizem điều huyền bí 神秘
References in classic literature ?
The lobster was a scarlet mystery to her, but she hammered and poked till it was unshelled and its meager proportions concealed in a grove of lettuce leaves.
In the presence of George Willard, Wing Bid- dlebaum, who for twenty years had been the town mystery, lost something of his timidity, and his shadowy personality, submerged in a sea of doubts, came forth to look at the world.
It does seem a mystery how it could have been taken in open daylight, while we were about camp together," said Tom.
The white light of the moon had fallen upon the world like the mystery and the softness of sleep.
No honest man will deny it," said the scout, a little nettled at the implied distrust of his explanation of the mystery of the tides; "and I grant that it is true on the small scale, and where the land is level.
His professional brethren, each for himself, adopted various hypotheses, more or less plausible, but all dressed out in a perplexing mystery of phrase, which, if it do not show a bewilderment of mind in these erudite physicians, certainly causes it in the unlearned peruser of their opinions.
The learned man," observed the stranger with another smile, "should come himself to look into the mystery.
It was most ingeniously secured at vacant hours, by a *withe twisted in the handle of the door, and stakes set against the window shutters; so that though a thief might get in with perfect ease, he would find some embarrassment in getting out, --an idea most probably borrowed by the architect, Yost Van Houten, from the mystery of an eelpot.
It was the first time, in a manner, that I had known space and air and freedom, all the music of summer and all the mystery of nature.
This account cleared up the otherwise unaccountable mystery, and showed that the landlord, after all, had had no idea of fooling me --but at the same time what could I think of a harpooneer who stayed out a Saturday night clean into the holy Sabbath, engaged in such a cannibal business as selling the heads of dead idolators?
The tavern-keeper's young son said it was kept locked all the time, and he never saw any- body go into it or come out of it except at night; he did not know any particular reason for this state of things; had had some little curiosity, but it was rather feeble; had made the most of the mystery by enter- taining himself with the idea that that room was "ha'nted"; had noticed that there was a light in there the night before.
He didn't sleep much, he was in such a sweat to get in there and find out the mystery about Phillips; and moreover he done a lot of guessing about it all night, which warn't no use, for if you are going to find out the facts of a thing, what's the sense in guessing out what ain't the facts and wasting ammunition?