mysticism


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Related to mysticism: Sufism, Islamic Mysticism

mys·ti·cism

 (mĭs′tĭ-sĭz′əm)
n.
1.
a. Belief in direct experience of transcendent reality or God, especially by means of contemplation and asceticism instead of rational thought.
b. Such experience had by an individual.
2. Belief in the existence of realities beyond perceptual or intellectual apprehension that are directly accessible by subjective experience: belief in séances, astral projection, and similar mysticism.
3. Belief that is not based on evidence or subjected to criticism: "[When] grappling with the evils they have themselves exposed ... these lifelong Marxists drift off into vague mysticism and into worship of personality" (I.F. Stone).

mysticism

(ˈmɪstɪˌsɪzəm)
n
1. belief in or experience of a reality surpassing normal human understanding or experience, esp a reality perceived as essential to the nature of life
2. (Theology) a system of contemplative prayer and spirituality aimed at achieving direct intuitive experience of the divine
3. obscure or confused belief or thought

mys•ti•cism

(ˈmɪs təˌsɪz əm)

n.
1. the beliefs, ideas, or mode of thought of mystics.
2. the doctrine of an immediate spiritual intuition of truths believed to transcend ordinary understanding, or of a direct, intimate union of the soul with God through contemplation or spiritual ecstasy.
3. obscure thought or speculation.
[1730–40]

Mysticism


the mystical teachings of Jakob Boehme (1575-1624), an influence on George Fox and Quakerism. — Boehmenist, Boehmist, Boehmenite, n.
the mystical theories of Antoinette Bourignon (1616-80), popular in the Netherlands and in Scotland.
the beliefs and practices of pre-Christian and early Christian sects, condemned by the church, especially the conviction that matter is evil and that knowledge is more important than faith, and the practice of esoteric mysticism. — Gnostic, n., adj.
1. the occult concepts, ideas, or philosophy set forth in the writings of the hermeticists of the late Middle Ages and the early Renaissance.
2. adherence to, belief in, or propagation of these concepts and ideas.
3. Literature. a symbolic and arcane style similar to that of the hermeticists, especially in the poetry of certain French symbolist poets. — hermeticist, hermetist, n. — hermetic, hermetical, adj.
the doctrine that knowledge of the Absolute is within human reach, but through a higher religious consciousness rather than by logical processes. See also god and gods. — metagnostic, adj.
1. the principles, doctrines, and practices of mysticism.
2. the interpretation of mysteries, as the Eleusinian. — mystagogue, n. — mystagogic, mystagogical, adj.
a teacher of mystical doctrines.
the practice of staring at one’s navel to induce a mystical trance. Also called omphaloskepsis. — omphalopsychite, n.
the Gnostic concept of the spiritual world, representing the fullness of the Divine Being and the eons emanating therefrom.
1. any of various forms of philosophical or religious thought claiming a mystical insight into the divine nature and natural phenomena.
2. (cap.) the system of belief and practice of the Theosophical Society. — theosophist, n. — theosophical, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.mysticism - a religion based on mystical communion with an ultimate realitymysticism - a religion based on mystical communion with an ultimate reality
faith, religion, religious belief - a strong belief in a supernatural power or powers that control human destiny; "he lost his faith but not his morality"
quietism - a form of religious mysticism requiring withdrawal from all human effort and passive contemplation of God
Sufism - Islamic mysticism
2.mysticism - obscure or irrational thought
cerebration, intellection, mentation, thinking, thought process, thought - the process of using your mind to consider something carefully; "thinking always made him frown"; "she paused for thought"
Translations
misticizam

mysticism

[ˈmɪstɪsɪzəm] Nmisticismo m; (= doctrine, literary genre) → mística f

mysticism

[ˈmɪstɪsɪzəm] nmysticisme m

mysticism

nMystizismus m; (of poetry etc)Mystik f, → Mystische(s) nt

mysticism

[ˈmɪˌstɪsɪzm] nmisticismo
References in classic literature ?
Mysticism, with its marvellous power of making common things strange to us, and the subtle antinomianism that always seems to accompany it, moved him for a season; and for a season he inclined to the materialistic doctrines of the Darwinismus movement in Germany, and found a curious pleasure in tracing the thoughts and passions of men to some pearly cell in the brain, or some white nerve in the body, delighting in the conception of the absolute dependence of the spirit on certain physical conditions, morbid or healthy, normal or diseased.
Whatever his outward demeanour may have been, his poetry gives us no indication of it, being full of delicate mysticism, almost impossible to reproduce in the English language.
And I am the more persuaded of that suspicion, if one can call it so, by the fact that if you take, for instance, the antithesis of the normal man, that is, the man of acute consciousness, who has come, of course, not out of the lap of nature but out of a retort (this is almost mysticism, gentlemen, but I suspect this, too), this retort-made man is sometimes so nonplussed in the presence of his antithesis that with all his exaggerated consciousness he genuinely thinks of himself as a mouse and not a man.
Indeed to say the truth, that trait of mind in the philosophic Bon-Bon did begin at length to assume a character of strange intensity and mysticism, and appeared deeply tinctured with the diablerie of his favorite German studies.
The mysticism that was buried deep under all the cynicism of his experience was awake and moving in the depths.
She was carrying an armful of Bibles for her class, and such was her view of life that events which produced heartache in others wrought beatific smiles upon her--an enviable result, although, in the opinion of Angel, it was obtained by a curiously unnatural sacrifice of humanity to mysticism.
Mysticism consists in the mistake of an accidental and individual symbol for an universal one.
He was a man of unusual character, mystical after the fashion of a time that had no leaning to mysticism, who was impatient with life because he found himself unable to say the things which the obscure impulses of his heart suggested.
He behaved admirably at the beginning of his reign and during 1812, but acted badly by giving a constitution to Poland, forming the Holy Alliance, entrusting power to Arakcheev, favoring Golitsyn and mysticism, and afterwards Shishkov and Photius.
Richard Leyburn, deceased before the story begins, but warm in the memory of the few who had known him, above all of his great-souled daughter Catherine, strikes us, with his religious mysticism, as being in this way one of the best things in the book:--
The Prince smiled, and in his smile there seemed to be a certain mysticism.
It was a deliberate attack on the mysticism of the Maeterlinck school - an attack from the citadel of positive science upon the wonder-dreamers, but an attack nevertheless that retained much of beauty and wonder of the sort compatible with ascertained fact.