myth


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Related to myth: Greek myth

myth

 (mĭth)
n.
1.
a. A traditional, typically ancient story dealing with supernatural beings, ancestors, or heroes that serves as a fundamental type in the worldview of a people, as by explaining aspects of the natural world or delineating the psychology, customs, or ideals of society: the myth of Eros and Psyche; a creation myth.
b. Such stories considered as a group: the realm of myth.
2. A popular belief or story that has become associated with a person, institution, or occurrence, especially one considered to illustrate a cultural ideal: a star whose fame turned her into a myth; the pioneer myth of suburbia.
3. A fiction or half-truth, especially one that forms part of an ideology.
4. A fictitious story, person, or thing: "German artillery superiority on the Western Front was a myth" (Leon Wolff).

[New Latin mȳthus, from Late Latin mȳthos, from Greek mūthos.]

myth

(mɪθ)
n
1. (Classical Myth & Legend)
a. a story about superhuman beings of an earlier age taken by preliterate society to be a true account, usually of how natural phenomena, social customs, etc, came into existence
b. another word for mythology1, mythology3
2. a person or thing whose existence is fictional or unproven
3. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) (in modern literature) a theme or character type embodying an idea: Hemingway's myth of the male hero.
4. (Philosophy) philosophy (esp in the writings of Plato) an allegory or parable
[C19: via Late Latin from Greek muthos fable, word]

myth

(mɪθ)

n.
1. a traditional or legendary story, esp. one that involves gods and heroes and explains a cultural practice or natural phenomenon.
2. stories of this kind collectively.
3. an invented story, fictitious person, etc.: His account of the event is pure myth.
4. a belief or set of beliefs, often unproven or false, that have accrued around a person, phenomenon, or institution: myths of racial superiority.
[1820–30; < Late Latin mȳthos < Greek mŷthos story, word]
syn: See legend.

myth

A fictitious story, frequently intended to explain a phenomenon and generally concerning gods or beings from before written history; a story in which a theme or character embodies an idea in a similar way.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.myth - a traditional story accepted as historymyth - a traditional story accepted as history; serves to explain the world view of a people
story - a piece of fiction that narrates a chain of related events; "he writes stories for the magazines"
Gotterdammerung, Ragnarok, Twilight of the Gods - myth about the ultimate destruction of the gods in a battle with evil
mythology - myths collectively; the body of stories associated with a culture or institution or person

myth

noun
2. illusion, story, fancy, fantasy, imagination, invention, delusion, superstition, fabrication, falsehood, figment, tall story, cock and bull story (informal) Contrary to popular myth, most women are not spendthrifts.

myth

noun
1. A traditional story or tale that has no proven factual basis:
2. A body of traditional beliefs and notions accumulated about a particular subject:
3. Any fictitious idea accepted as part of an ideology by an uncritical group; a received idea:
Translations
أُسْطُورَةٌأسْطورَهاسطورة
mýtus
myte
myyttiuskomuskertomus
mit
mítoszrege
goîsögn
神話
신화
kaip mitasmitasmitologijamitologinispramanytas
mīts
mýtus
izmišljotinamit
myt
นิทานปรัมปรา
thần thoại

myth

[mɪθ] N (= story) → mito m; (= imaginary person, thing) → mito m, ilusión f
a Greek mythun mito griego
that's a mytheso es un mito
it's a myth that boiling water freezes faster than cold wateres un mito que el agua hirviendo se congela más rápidamente que el agua fría
see also urban B

myth

[ˈmɪθ] n
(= legend) → mythe m
a Greek myth → un mythe grec
(= fallacy) → mythe m
That's a myth → C'est un mythe.
the myth of love at first sight → le mythe du coup de foudre
contrary to popular myth ... → contrairement aux idées reçues ...

myth

nMythos m; (fig)Märchen nt; it’s a myth (fig)das ist doch ein Gerücht or Märchen

myth

[mɪθ] nmito

myth

(miθ) noun
an ancient, fictional story, especially one dealing with gods, heroes etc.
ˈmythical adjective
ˈmythically adverb
mythology (miˈθolədʒi) noun
(a collection of) myths.
ˌmythoˈlogical (-ˈlo-) adjective

myth

أُسْطُورَةٌ mýtus myte Mythos μύθος mito myytti mythe mit mito 神話 신화 mythe myte mit mito миф myt นิทานปรัมปรา efsane thần thoại 神话

myth

n mito
References in classic literature ?
But there were other companies, probably a thousand or more, which were organized by promoters who built their hopes on the fact that the Bell Companies were unpopular, and on the myth that they were fabulously rich.
Is not Medoro the mythic form for all courtiers of feminine royalty, and Orlando the myth of disorderly, furious, and impotent revolutions, which destroy but cannot produce?
For the moment her fears had been allayed by the sight of the camp, which she had come to look upon as more or less a myth.
I say he is a myth," replied Albert, "and never had an existence.
Listen, Conrart, this is the morality of Epicurus, whom, besides, I consider, if I must tell you so, as a myth.
Beloved by one, a sort of instinctive and savage half-man, for its beauty, for its stature, for the harmonies which emanated from its magnificent ensemble; beloved by the other, a learned and passionate imagination, for its myth, for the sense which it contains, for the symbolism scattered beneath the sculptures of its front,--like the first text underneath the second in a palimpsest,--in a word, for the enigma which it is eternally propounding to the understanding.
That's part of the myth about me, I know," Katharine replied.
After these amenities, the white master and the black talked of many things, the one bluffing with the white-man's superiority of intellect and knowledge, the other feeling and guessing, primitive statesman that he was, in an effort to ascertain the balance of human and political forces that bore upon his Su'u territory, ten miles square, bounded by the sea and by landward lines of an inter- tribal warfare that was older than the oldest Su'u myth.
This is how and why it is that the French system of administration, the purest and best on the globe has rendered robbery, as his Excellency has just told you, next to impossible, and as for peculation, it is a myth.
Then by means of the Myth of Pandora the poet shows how evil and the need for work first arose, and goes on to describe the Five Ages of the World, tracing the gradual increase in evil, and emphasizing the present miserable condition of the world, a condition in which struggle is inevitable.
In dealing with human beings, we are perpetually distracted by being told that such-and-such a view is gloomy or cynical or pessimistic: ages of human conceit have built up such a vast myth as to our wisdom and virtue that any intrusion of the mere scientific desire to know the facts is instantly resented by those who cling to comfortable illusions.
Her myth ought to be taken to heart amongst the Tyburnians, the Belgravians--her story, and perhaps Becky's too.