mythogenesis


Related to mythogenesis: mythologize, mythoi, mythologised

mythogenesis

(ˌmɪθəˈdʒɛnɪsɪs)
n
1. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) the creation and development of myths
2. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) the tendency to give a person or event mythical status

mythogenesis

1. the establishment and development of myths.
2. the tendency to create myths or to give mythical status to a person or event. Also called mythogeny. — mythogenetic, adj.
See also: Mythology
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References in periodicals archive ?
The author--Steven Usitalo, a historian of the Soviet Union--begins by using Lomonosov's diaries to elucidate his work and his relationship with patronage and the ruling class, and traces out several stages at mythogenesis that occurred after his death, and several re-inventions that his myth has gone through.
24) And if Hamlet has risen to mythic status in the last four hundred years, Hamletmachine critiques that very mythogenesis, as Muller himself proclaims with reference to Hamlet: "mythos is an aggregate, a machine, to which ever new and different machines can be connected.
The opposition of sense to transcendence disappears in this precept, as human mythogenesis entails the incorporation of spatial and temporal phenomena in an expanding human consciousness.
2) These "vortices," apparently made up of different compositions of wood types, through an apparently fantastic but latently natural process, "suck at the mind"; they enhance mythogenesis and create the legendary figures of the Jungian collective unconscious from wood and leaf litter--Holdstock's uncanny imagination ignited by a simple but nonetheless revolutionary idea.
Richard Slotkin, professor of English at Wesleyan University has spent his career examining the origins of this "American mythogenesis," (14) In his examination of frontier literature, he argues that, although America's beginnings have been portrayed as pure and noble imbued with the divinely mandated intention of establishing a nation free of oppression, a careful examination of history reveals that America was established as a "gunfighter nation," whose existence is founded on the "frontier" or "wilderness" myth.
Slotkin's view is that both narratives of the frontier mythogenesis persist and influence the sentiments and actions of Americans.
But there are more complex questions to ask in the analysis of our "gunfighter nation" and the frontier mythogenesis necessary for America's perpetual invasion of the world.
Similar to the frontier mythogenesis of America, the wilderness and the Native must be tamed and assimilated.
Tropper Baumann, The Mythogenesis of Gender: Judicial Images of Women in