nabob


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na·bob

 (nā′bŏb′)
n.
1. A governor in India under the Mughal Empire. Also called nawab.
2. A person of wealth and prominence.

[Hindi nawāb, nabāb, from Arabic nuwwāb, pl. of nā'ib, deputy, active participle of nāba, to represent; see nwb in Semitic roots.]

nabob

(ˈneɪbɒb)
n
1. informal a rich, powerful, or important man
2. (Historical Terms) (formerly) a European who made a fortune in the Orient, esp in India
3. (Historical Terms) another name for a nawab
[C17: from Portuguese nababo, from Hindi nawwāb; see nawab]
nabobery, ˈnabobism n
ˈnabobish adj

na•bob

(ˈneɪ bɒb)

n.
1. any very wealthy, influential, or powerful person.
2. (formerly, in Britain) a person who had acquired a large fortune in India.
3. Archaic. nawab.
[1605–15; < Hindi nawāb]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.nabob - a governor in India during the Mogul empirenabob - a governor in India during the Mogul empire
Bharat, India, Republic of India - a republic in the Asian subcontinent in southern Asia; second most populous country in the world; achieved independence from the United Kingdom in 1947
governor - the head of a state government
2.nabob - a wealthy man (especially one who made his fortune in the Orient)
man of means, rich man, wealthy man - a man who is wealthy

nabob

noun
Translations
nábob

nabob

[ˈneɪbɒb] Nnabab m

nabob

nNabob m; (fig also)Krösus m
References in classic literature ?
He had the whitest shirt on you ever see, too, and the shiniest hat; and there ain't a man in that town that's got as fine clothes as what he had; and he had a gold watch and chain, and a silver-headed cane -- the awful- est old gray-headed nabob in the State.
The overwhelming logic and feeling of his speech 'On the Nabob of Arcot's Debts' produced so little effect at its delivery that the ministers against whom it was directed did not even think necessary to answer it.
I thought it best not to ask; but you may be sure it is to some horrid old nabob, or to some dissipated little duke.
Hobnail, the reformer; and Reverend Jul Bat, who has converted the whole torrid zone in his Sunday school; and Signor Torre del Greco, who extinguished Vesuvius by pouring into it the Bay of Naples; Spahi, the Persian ambassador; and Tul Wil Shan, the exiled nabob of Nepaul, whose saddle is the new moon.
had got to be enumerated among the Manhattan nabobs.
Caverly owned farms in Orange County that had been leased out for long periods (the lives of three persons named at the moment the lease was granted) but which were now about to revert to him--such long-term leases, in the Hudson Valley, led to the so-called anti-rent war that was breaking out at the time Cooper wrote this book; twelve and a half cents = an English shilling, still often used in conversation in America; nabobs = rich men (usually businessmen of recent affluence)}
Few travellers that have visited Canada some thirty years since, in the days of the M'Tavishes, the M'Gillivrays, the M'Kenzies, the Frobishers, and the other magnates of the Northwest, when the company was in all its glory, but must remember the round of feasting and revelry kept up among these hyperborean nabobs.
Perhaps," said Willoughby, "his observations may have extended to the existence of nabobs, gold mohrs, and palanquins.
In two hours' time," said he, "these persons will depart richer by fifty piastres each, to go and risk their lives again by endeavoring to gain fifty more; then they will return with a fortune of six hundred francs, and waste this treasure in some city with the pride of sultans and the insolence of nabobs.
There were no foreclosures of mortgages, no protested notes, no bills payable, no debts of honour in Typee; no unreasonable tailors and shoemakers perversely bent on being paid; no duns of any description and battery attorneys, to foment discord, backing their clients up to a quarrel, and then knocking their heads together; no poor relations, everlastingly occupying the spare bed-chamber, and diminishing the elbow room at the family table; no destitute widows with their children starving on the cold charities of the world; no beggars; no debtors' prisons; no proud and hard-hearted nabobs in Typee; or to sum up all in one word--no Money
Caption: HMS Nabob (D77) was torpedoed by German submarine U-354 in the Barents Sea on August 22, 1944.
Plays like Samuel Foote's The Nabob and portions of William Cowper's The Task capture the widespread feeling that India-returned "nabobs" were destroying the carefully contrived stability of English social life with their ill-gotten imperial gains.