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One that is named after another.

[From the phrase for the name's sake.]


1. a person or thing named after another
2. a person or thing with the same name as another
[C17: probably a shortening of the phrase describing people connected for the name's sake]



1. a person named after another.
2. a person having the same name as another.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.namesake - a person with the same name as another
individual, mortal, person, somebody, someone, soul - a human being; "there was too much for one person to do"
سَمِي، شَخْص يَحْمِل نَفْس الأسْم
nafnanafninafni, nafna


[ˈneɪmseɪk] Ntocayo/a m/f, homónimo/a m/f


[ˈneɪmseɪk] nhomonyme mfname tape nmarque f


[ˈneɪmˌseɪk] nomonimo/a


(neim) noun
1. a word by which a person, place or thing is called. My name is Rachel; She knows all the flowers by name.
2. reputation; fame. He has a name for honesty.
1. to give a name to. They named the child Thomas.
2. to speak of or list by name. He could name all the kings of England.
ˈnameless adjective
1. not having a name. a nameless fear.
2. not spoken of by name. The author of the book shall be nameless.
ˈnamely adverb
that is. Only one student passed the exam, namely John.
ˈnameplate noun
a piece of metal, plastic etc with a name on it. You will know his office by the nameplate on the door.
ˈnamesake noun
a person with the same name as oneself.
call (someone) names
to insult (someone) by applying rude names to him.
in the name of
by the authority of. I arrest you in the name of the Queen.
make a name for oneself
to become famous, get a (usually good) reputation etc. He made a name for himself as a concert pianist.
name after , (American) name for
to give (a child or a thing) the name of (another person). Peter was named after his father.
References in classic literature ?
Indulge yourself," he whispered; "ought not the suggestion of the worthy namesake of the Psalmist to have its weight at such a moment?
The common people regarded it with a mixture of respect and superstition, partly out of sympathy for the fate of its ill- starred namesake, and partly from the tales of strange sights, and doleful lamentations, told concerning it.
The La Belle Riviere, as brave and beautiful a boat as ever walked the waters of her namesake river, was floating gayly down the stream, under a brilliant sky, the stripes and stars of free America waving and fluttering over head; the guards crowded with well-dressed ladies and gentlemen walking and enjoying the delightful day.
The first time she heard that form of salute used at the telephone she was surprised, and not pleased; but I told her I had given order for it: that henceforth and forever the tele- phone must always be invoked with that reverent for- mality, in perpetual honor and remembrance of my lost friend and her small namesake.
Early in the evening he embraced her, and her scarcely less dear namesake, pretending that he would return by-and-bye (an imaginary engagement took him out, and he had secreted a valise of clothes ready), and so he emerged into the heavy mist of the heavy streets, with a heavier heart.
And respecting language, I willingly hold communication in that spoken by my respected grandmother, Hilda of Middleham, who died in odour of sanctity, little short, if we may presume to say so, of her glorious namesake, the blessed Saint Hilda of Whitby, God be gracious to her soul
He added further, 'As soon as she knew that you were my namesake she tried to get you destroyed, so that you might not free me from the spell.
Did not my great-granduncle, Peter Goldthwaite, who died seventy years ago, and whose namesake I am, leave treasure enough to build twenty such?
Chad's Bess was the object of peculiar compassion, because her hair, being turned back under a cap which was set at the top of her head, exposed to view an ornament of which she was much prouder than of her red cheeks--namely, a pair of large round ear-rings with false garnets in them, ornaments condemned not only by the Methodists, but by her own cousin and namesake Timothy's Bess, who, with much cousinly feeling, often wished "them ear- rings" might come to good.
Paul’s; when Hiram knows that it is entirely mine; a little taken front a print of his namesake in London, I own; but essentially, as to all points of genius, my own.
Then he swam round and round, ducking in and out of the bars of the moonlight like the frog, his namesake.
But one day, yielding to an impulse, she wrote to Norah asking if her little namesake could come for a month's visit.