namesake


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name·sake

 (nām′sāk′)
n.
One that is named after another.

[From the phrase for the name's sake.]

namesake

(ˈneɪmˌseɪk)
n
1. a person or thing named after another
2. a person or thing with the same name as another
[C17: probably a shortening of the phrase describing people connected for the name's sake]

name•sake

(ˈneɪmˌseɪk)

n.
1. a person named after another.
2. a person having the same name as another.
[1640–50]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.namesake - a person with the same name as another
individual, mortal, person, somebody, someone, soul - a human being; "there was too much for one person to do"
Translations
سَمِي، شَخْص يَحْمِل نَفْس الأسْم
jmenovec
navnefælle
imenjak
névrokon
nafnanafninafni, nafna
menovec
namne

namesake

[ˈneɪmseɪk] Ntocayo/a m/f, homónimo/a m/f

namesake

[ˈneɪmseɪk] nhomonyme mfname tape nmarque f

namesake

[ˈneɪmˌseɪk] nomonimo/a

name

(neim) noun
1. a word by which a person, place or thing is called. My name is Rachel; She knows all the flowers by name.
2. reputation; fame. He has a name for honesty.
verb
1. to give a name to. They named the child Thomas.
2. to speak of or list by name. He could name all the kings of England.
ˈnameless adjective
1. not having a name. a nameless fear.
2. not spoken of by name. The author of the book shall be nameless.
ˈnamely adverb
that is. Only one student passed the exam, namely John.
ˈnameplate noun
a piece of metal, plastic etc with a name on it. You will know his office by the nameplate on the door.
ˈnamesake noun
a person with the same name as oneself.
call (someone) names
to insult (someone) by applying rude names to him.
in the name of
by the authority of. I arrest you in the name of the Queen.
make a name for oneself
to become famous, get a (usually good) reputation etc. He made a name for himself as a concert pianist.
name after , (American) name for
to give (a child or a thing) the name of (another person). Peter was named after his father.
References in classic literature ?
He added further, 'As soon as she knew that you were my namesake she tried to get you destroyed, so that you might not free me from the spell.
And respecting language, I willingly hold communication in that spoken by my respected grandmother, Hilda of Middleham, who died in odour of sanctity, little short, if we may presume to say so, of her glorious namesake, the blessed Saint Hilda of Whitby, God be gracious to her soul
Indeed, her conversation was so pure, her looks so sage, and her whole deportment so grave and solemn, that she seemed to deserve the name of saint equally with her namesake, or with any other female in the Roman kalendar.
Now, that you may reach the Lord Advocate well recommended, I give you here a letter to a namesake of your own, the learned Mr.
At Caddy's request I took the supreme direction of her apartment, trimmed it up, and pushed her, couch and all, into a lighter and more airy and more cheerful corner than she had yet occupied; then, every day, when we were in our neatest array, I used to lay my small small namesake in her arms and sit down to chat or work or read to her.
He had by this time founded a club of literary men which met at "a famous beef-steak house," and here he lorded it over his fellows as his bulky namesake had done more than a hundred years before.
The first time she heard that form of salute used at the telephone she was surprised, and not pleased; but I told her I had given order for it: that henceforth and forever the tele- phone must always be invoked with that reverent for- mality, in perpetual honor and remembrance of my lost friend and her small namesake.
The name of the strong man of Old Scripture had descended to the chief functionary who worked it; but, so armed, he was stronger than his namesake, and blinder, and tore away the gates of God's own Temple every day.
Unkind people said that, like her Imperial namesake, she had won her way to success by strength of will and hardness of heart, and a kind of haughty effrontery that was somehow justified by the extreme decency and dignity of her private life.
I am not prepared to defend my namesake," he said; "but every man has a right to do what he likes with his own, hasn't he?
Your namesake,' said Mrs Kenwigs, with a sweet smile.
It's because she was in love with that fat one in spectacles" (that was how Petya described his namesake, the new Count Bezukhov) "and now she's in love with that singer" (he meant Natasha's Italian singing master), "that's why she's ashamed