naming


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name

 (nām)
n.
1.
a. A word or words by which an entity is designated and distinguished from others.
b. A word or group of words used to describe or evaluate, often disparagingly: Don't call me names.
2. Representation or repute, as opposed to reality: a democracy in name, a police state in fact.
3.
a. A reputation: has a bad name.
b. A distinguished reputation: made a name for himself as a drummer.
4. An illustrious or outstanding person: joined several famous names for a photograph. See Synonyms at celebrity.
tr.v. named, nam·ing, names
1. To give a name to: named the child after both grandparents.
2. To mention, specify, or cite by name: named the primary colors.
3. To call by an epithet: named them all cowards.
4. To nominate for or appoint to a duty, office, or honor. See Synonyms at appoint.
5. To specify or fix: We need to name the time for our meeting.
adj. Informal
Well-known by a name: a name performer.
Idioms:
in the name of
1. By the authority of: Open up in the name of the law!
2. For the reason of; using as a reason: grisly experiments performed in the name of science.
to (one's) name
Belonging to one: I don't have a hat to my name.

[Middle English, from Old English nama; see nō̆-men- in Indo-European roots.]

nam′a·ble, name′a·ble adj.
nam′er n.

naming

(ˈneɪmɪŋ)
n
the act of giving a name to someone or something
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.naming - the verbal act of namingnaming - the verbal act of naming; "the part he failed was the naming of state capitals"
speech act - the use of language to perform some act
acrophony - naming a letter of the alphabet by using a word whose initial sound is the sound represented by that letter
numeration - naming numbers
denotation, indication - the act of indicating or pointing out by name
specification - naming explicitly
2.naming - the act of putting a person into a non-elective positionnaming - the act of putting a person into a non-elective position; "the appointment had to be approved by the whole committee"
decision, determination, conclusion - the act of making up your mind about something; "the burden of decision was his"; "he drew his conclusions quickly"
nomination - the act of officially naming a candidate; "the Republican nomination for Governor"
co-optation, co-option - the act of appointing summarily (with or without the appointee's consent)
delegacy - the appointment of a delegate
ordinance, ordination - the act of ordaining; the act of conferring (or receiving) holy orders; "the rabbi's family was present for his ordination"
recognition - designation by the chair granting a person the right to speak in a deliberative body; "he was unable to make his motion because he couldn't get recognition by the chairman"
Adj.1.naming - inclined to or serving for the giving of names; "the appellative faculty of children"; "the appellative function of some primitive rites"
denotative, denotive - having the power of explicitly denoting or designating or naming
Translations
Namensgebung
dénomminationnommage

naming

nNamen(s)gebung f
References in classic literature ?
At the appointed hour the king made a sign, and the heralds, in their tabards, appeared and made proclamation, naming the combatants and stating the cause of quarrel.
These three names are common and familiar in every nook and corner of heaven, clear from one end of it to the other - fully as well known as the eighty Supreme Archangels, in fact - where as our Moses, and Adam, and the rest, have not been heard of outside of our world's little corner of heaven, except by a few very learned men scattered here and there - and they always spell their names wrong, and get the performances of one mixed up with the doings of another, and they almost always locate them simply IN OUR SOLAR SYSTEM, and think that is enough without going into little details such as naming the particular world they are from.
Luckily he had no responsibilities; his father and his twin brother had died when he was yet a boy, and his mother, whose only noteworthy achievement had been the naming of her twin sons Marquis de Lafayette and Lorenzo de Medici Randall, had supported herself and educated her child by making coats up to the very day of her death.
Elton quitted them, and she could not but do him the justice of feeling that there was a great deal of sentiment in his manner of naming Harriet at parting; in the tone of his voice while assuring her that he should call at Mrs.
Even I, safe as an Englishman, and even Tellson's, important as they are to French credit, avoid all naming of the matter.
If a gentleman was the victim of spies, intruders, and informers (but still naming no names), that was his own pleasure.
And this party swept the faces of certain of the king's councillors, naming them guilty of the witch- work.
O by what Name, for thou above all these, Above mankinde, or aught then mankinde higher, Surpassest farr my naming, how may I Adore thee, Author of this Universe, And all this good to man, for whose well being So amply, and with hands so liberal Thou hast provided all things: but with mee I see not who partakes.
Thirdly, when the knights present had accomplished their vow, by each of them breaking five lances, the Prince was to declare the victor in the first day's tourney, who should receive as prize a warhorse of exquisite beauty and matchless strength; and in addition to this reward of valour, it was now declared, he should have the peculiar honour of naming the Queen of Love and Beauty, by whom the prize should be given on the ensuing day.
After naming the first precautions, the doctor left the room, to prepare, himself, a calming potion.
he said to me, leaning back in his easy-chair and naming the three new guests.
So throwing himself back in his arm-chair, he said, with an arrogant and purse-proud air, -- "Let me beg of you not to hesitate in naming your wishes; you will then be convinced that the resources of the house of Danglars, however limited, are still equal to meeting the largest demands; and were you even to require a million" --