napkin


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nap·kin

 (năp′kĭn)
n.
1. A piece of cloth or absorbent paper used at table to protect the clothes or wipe the lips and fingers.
2. A cloth or towel.
3. A sanitary napkin.
4. Chiefly British A diaper.

[Middle English : Old French nape, nappe, tablecloth; see nappe + -kin, -kin.]

napkin

(ˈnæpkɪn)
n
1. Also called: table napkin a usually square piece of cloth or paper used while eating to protect the clothes, wipe the mouth, etc; serviette
2. rare a similar piece of cloth used for example as a handkerchief or headscarf
3. a more formal name for nappy1
4. a less common term for sanitary towel
[C15: from Old French, from nape tablecloth, from Latin mappa small cloth, towel; see map]

nap•kin

(ˈnæp kɪn)

n.
1. a small piece of cloth or paper, usu. square, for use in wiping the lips and fingers and to protect the clothes while eating.
3. Chiefly Brit. diaper.
4. Scot. and North Eng. handkerchief.
5. Scot. kerchief.
[1350–1400; Middle English, =nape tablecloth (< Middle French nappe < Latin mappa napkin) + -kin -kin; compare map]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.napkin - a small piece of table linen that is used to wipe the mouth and to cover the lap in order to protect clothingnapkin - a small piece of table linen that is used to wipe the mouth and to cover the lap in order to protect clothing
bib - a napkin tied under the chin of a child while eating
dinner napkin - a large napkin used when dinner is served
napery, table linen - linens for the dining table
tea napkin - a small napkin used when tea is served
2.napkin - garment consisting of a folded cloth drawn up between the legs and fastened at the waistnapkin - garment consisting of a folded cloth drawn up between the legs and fastened at the waist; worn by infants to catch excrement
garment - an article of clothing; "garments of the finest silk"

napkin

noun serviette, cloth She dabbed her lips carefully with a napkin.
Translations
الشَّكل الكامِل للكَلِمَه السابِقَه في 1فوطَهمِنْدِيلُ الْـمَائِدَةِمِنْدِيلُ الـمَائِدَة
ubrousekplena
servietble
lautasliinaservettiterveyssidevaippa
ubrus
egészségügyi betétpelenkasálszalvéta
bleyjaservíetta, munnòurrka
ナプキン
냅킨식탁용 냅킨
palutėservetėlėvystyklas
autiņisalvete
plienka
prtič
servett
ผ้าเช็ดปากผ้าเช็ดปากบนโต๊ะอาหาร
peçetekağıt peçetenappynin tam şekli
khăn ăn

napkin

[ˈnæpkɪn]
A. N (= table napkin) → servilleta f (Brit) (baby's) → pañal m (US) (= sanitary towel) → compresa f higiénica, paño m higiénico
B. CPD napkin ring Nservilletero m

napkin

[ˈnæpkɪn] nserviette f (de table)napkin ring nrond m de serviette

napkin

n
(= table napkin)Serviette f, → Mundtuch nt (old)
(for baby) → Windel f; (US: = sanitary napkin) → (Damen)binde f

napkin

[ˈnæpkɪn] n (also table napkin) → tovagliolo, salvietta

napkin

(ˈnӕpkin) noun
1. (also table napkin) a small piece of cloth or paper for protecting the clothes from drips etc and for wiping the lips at meals.
2. full form of nappy.

napkin

مِنْدِيلُ الْـمَائِدَةِ, مِنْدِيلُ الـمَائِدَة ubrousek serviet Serviette πετσέτα φαγητού servilleta lautasliina serviette ubrus tovagliolo ナプキン 냅킨, 식탁용 냅킨 servet serviett serwetka guardanapo салфетка servett ผ้าเช็ดปาก, ผ้าเช็ดปากบนโต๊ะอาหาร kağıt peçete, peçete khăn ăn 餐巾, 餐巾纸

napkin

n. servilleta.

napkin

V. sanitary.
References in classic literature ?
Beth clapped her hands, regardless of the biscuit she held, and Jo tossed up her napkin, crying, "A letter
Yes, he must bring out seats and food for both, and in serving us present not ewer and napkin with more show of respect to the one than to the other.
He had to eat with a knife and fork; he had to use napkin, cup, and plate; he had to learn his book, he had to go to church; he had to talk so properly that speech was become insipid in his mouth; whitherso- ever he turned, the bars and shackles of civilization shut him in and bound him hand and foot.
So when she carried the toast to her aunt a little later, it was in the best gilt-edged china bowl, with a fringed napkin on the tray and a sprig of geranium lying across the salt cellar.
The morning that Dickon--after they had been enjoying themselves in the garden for about two hours--went behind a big rosebush and brought forth two tin pails and revealed that one was full of rich new milk with cream on the top of it, and that the other held cottage-made currant buns folded in a clean blue and white napkin, buns so carefully tucked in that they were still hot, there was a riot of surprised joyfulness.
He had a plate of strawberries on his lap, with a napkin under them to preserve the purity of his white dressing-gown.
Rounding his mouth and both his eyes, as he stepped backward from the table, the waiter shifted his napkin from his right arm to his left, dropped into a comfortable attitude, and stood surveying the guest while he ate and drank, as from an observatory or watchtower.
upon which the Earl commanded Alexander Richard, one of his attendants, to stop the patient's mouth with a napkin, which was done accordingly.
She fetched a napkin and laid in it the magic fruits from the enchanted garden, which sparkled and shone like the most beautiful jewels.
To be brief, those who had gone upstairs acted so promptly that in an instant they came down, carrying Hadji Morato with his hands bound and a napkin tied over his mouth, which prevented him from uttering a word, warning him at the same time that to attempt to speak would cost him his life.
First he took from his bag a mass of what looked like thin, wafer-like biscuit, which was carefully rolled up in a white napkin.
The jeweller, meanwhile, was humming a song as he stood warming his back at the fire La Carconte had kindled to dry the wet garments of her guest; and this done, she next occupied herself in arranging his supper, by spreading a napkin at the end of the table, and placing on it the slender remains of their dinner, to which she added three or four fresh-laid eggs.