narcosis


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Related to narcosis: carbon dioxide narcosis

nar·co·sis

 (när-kō′sĭs)
n. pl. nar·co·ses (-sēz)
A condition of deep stupor or unconsciousness produced by a drug or other chemical substance.

[New Latin narcōsis, from Greek narkōsis, a numbing, from narkoun, to benumb, from narkē, numbness.]

narcosis

(nɑːˈkəʊsɪs)
n
(Medicine) unconsciousness induced by narcotics or general anaesthetics

nar•co•sis

(nɑrˈkoʊ sɪs)

n.
a state of drowsiness or stupor.
[1685–95; < New Latin < Greek nárkōsis= narkō-, variant s. of narkoûn to make numb, derivative of nárkē numbness + -sis -sis]

narcosis, narcoma

a condition of stupor or unconsciousness induced by drugs.
See also: Drugs
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.narcosis - unconsciousness induced by narcotics or anesthesia
unconsciousness - a state lacking normal awareness of the self or environment
nitrogen narcosis - confused or stuporous state caused by high levels of dissolved nitrogen in the blood; "deep-sea divers can suffer nitrogen narcosis from breathing air under high pressure"
Translations

narcosis

[nɑːˈkəʊsɪs] Nnarcosis f, narcotismo m

narcosis

nNarkose f

nar·co·sis

n. narcosis.
1. letargo y alivio de dolor por el efecto de narcóticos;
2. drogadicción.
References in periodicals archive ?
Experienced and well-prepared divers should only undertake this signature dive, as there are more chances of nitrogen narcosis to get hold of the divers at depths more than 30metres.
Divers at such depth can experience a condition called "nitrogen narcosis", which is caused by breathing nitrogen at a high partial pressure, resulting in effects similar to being drunk, and can lead to losing consciousness or even death, however, severity of the narcosis varies from diver to diver.
This might be partially explained by narcosis (Wezel and Opperhuizen, 1995; Ren, 2002; Roberts and Costello, 2003), which is a nonspecific mode of action where a chemical does not interact with a particular receptor in an organism (Verhaar et al, 1992; Cleuvers, 2002).
Like any pharmakon, intoxication insinuates itself into the text in a way that permits no absolute determinations--instead, intoxication, narcosis, and sobriety intermingle and overlap, exhibiting a porous logic that tugs at the boundaries of their social, political, and historical significances.
The maximum power transfer principle poses that voltage or current (amperes) by themselves are not good indicators of the amount of power transferred into the given organism and the resulting observed behaviors such as immobilization, taxis, or narcosis (Kolz, 2006).
Because the process is continuing with new tools and is a growing challenge, Wu recommends, "If we desire a future that avoids the enslavement of the propaganda state as well as the narcosis of the consumer and the celebrity culture, we must first acknowledge the preciousness of our attention.
Before you pick up your pens to demand my immediate resignation for bringing the IOCP into severe disrepute however, can I clarify that I was sitting in the midlands hyperbaric treatment chamber in Rugby's Hospital of St Cross, undergoing a simulated 50 metre deep dive, with a few other suitable victims, to sample the effects of nitrogen narcosis on us as SCUBA divers--the noise was pressurisation and the intoxication was, alas, just narcosis from excess nitrogen levels.
Los metodos de aturdimiento porcino de mayor uso a nivel global son el aturdimiento electrico de dos o tres puntos de contacto, la narcosis con C[O.
2] narcosis in the immediate post-operative period and haematoma, seroma, wound sepsis during their stay in hospital and also assessed for postoperative pain and its severity.
Communal Narcosis and Sublime Withdrawal: the Problem of Community in Kant's Critique of Judgment.
Ben's proud father Jonathan said: "There are a lot of complex things to learn for the exams, especially considering Ben is only 12 as he's answering questions about things like nitrogen narcosis and the percentage of oxygen in water.
2] narcosis can lead to seizures, coma, respiratory arrest and death.