narcotic


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nar·cot·ic

 (när-kŏt′ĭk)
n.
1.
a. A drug, such as morphine or heroin, that is derived from opium or an opiumlike compound, relieves pain, often induces sleep, can alter consciousness, and is potentially addictive.
b. A controlled substance.
2. A soothing, numbing agent or thing: "There was the blessed narcotic of bridge, at the Colony or at the home of friends" (Louis Auchincloss).
adj.
1. Inducing sleep or stupor; causing narcosis.
2. Of or relating to narcotics, their effects, or their use.
3. Of, relating to, or intended for one addicted to a narcotic.

[Middle English narcotik, from Old French narcotique, from Medieval Latin narcōticum, from Greek narkōtikon, from neuter of narkōtikos, numbing, from narkōsis, a numbing; see narcosis.]

nar·cot′i·cal·ly adv.

narcotic

(nɑːˈkɒtɪk)
n
1. (Pharmacology) any of a group of drugs, such as heroin, morphine, and pethidine, that produce numbness and stupor. They are used medicinally to relieve pain but are sometimes also taken for their pleasant effects; prolonged use may cause addiction
2. anything that relieves pain or induces sleep, mental numbness, etc
3. any illegal drug
adj
4. (Pharmacology) of, relating to, or designating narcotics
5. of or relating to narcotics addicts or users
6. (Medicine) of or relating to narcosis
[C14: via Medieval Latin from Greek narkōtikós, from narkoūn to render numb, from narkē numbness]
narˈcotically adv

nar•cot•ic

(nɑrˈkɒt ɪk)

n.
1. any of a class of habituating or addictive substances that blunt the senses and in increasing doses cause confusion, stupor, coma, and death: some are used in medicine to relieve intractable pain or induce anesthesia.
2. anything that exercises a soothing or numbing effect or influence.
adj.
3. of or having the power to produce narcosis, as a drug.
4. pertaining to or of the nature of narcosis.
5. of or pertaining to narcotics or their use.
6. used by, or in the treatment of, narcotic addicts.
[1350–1400; Middle English narcotik(e) (n.) < Medieval Latin narcōticum < Greek narkōtikón, n. use of neuter of narkōtikós numbing =narkō-, variant s. of narkoûn to numb (see narcosis) + -tikos -tic]
nar•cot′i•cal•ly, adv.

nar·cot·ic

(när-kŏt′ĭk)
Any of a group of drugs used to relieve pain and cause drowsiness. Narcotics are highly addictive.

narcotic

Any of various drugs used to induce sleep and relieve pain.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.narcotic - a drug that produces numbness or stupornarcotic - a drug that produces numbness or stupor; often taken for pleasure or to reduce pain; extensive use can lead to addiction
drug - a substance that is used as a medicine or narcotic
hard drug - a narcotic that is considered relatively strong and likely to cause addiction
Demerol, meperidine, meperidine hydrochloride - a synthetic narcotic drug (trade name Demerol) used to treat pain
methadon, methadone, methadone hydrochloride, synthetic heroin, dolophine hydrochloride, fixer - synthetic narcotic drug similar to morphine but less habit-forming; used in narcotic detoxification and maintenance of heroin addiction
opiate - a narcotic drug that contains opium or an opium derivative
opium - an addictive narcotic extracted from seed capsules of the opium poppy
recreational drug - a narcotic drug that is used only occasionally and is claimed to be nonaddictive
soft drug - a drug of abuse that is considered relatively mild and not likely to cause addiction
connection - a supplier (especially of narcotics)
space cadet - someone who seems unable to respond appropriately to reality (as if under the influence of some narcotic drug)
addiction, dependance, habituation, dependence, dependency - being abnormally tolerant to and dependent on something that is psychologically or physically habit-forming (especially alcohol or narcotic drugs)
drug addiction, white plague - an addiction to a drug (especially a narcotic drug)
Adj.1.narcotic - of or relating to or designating narcoticsnarcotic - of or relating to or designating narcotics; "narcotic addicts"; "narcotic stupor"
2.narcotic - inducing stupor or narcosis; "narcotic drugs"
depressant - capable of depressing physiological or psychological activity or response by a chemical agent
3.narcotic - inducing mental lethargy; "a narcotic speech"
uninteresting - arousing no interest or attention or curiosity or excitement; "a very uninteresting account of her trip"

narcotic

noun
1. drug, anaesthetic, downer (informal), painkiller, sedative, opiate, palliative, tranquillizer, anodyne, analgesic He appears to be under the influence of some sort of narcotic.
adjective

narcotic

noun
1. A substance that affects the central nervous system and is often addictive:
Informal: dope.
2. Something that induces sleep or sedation:
adjective
Translations
narkotikum
narkotika
droognarko-narkootikumnarkootilineuimasti
huumausaineunilääke
narkotika
narcoticnarcotică
narkotikum
knarknarkotikanarkotisk

narcotic

[nɑːˈkɒtɪk]
A. N
1. (Med) → narcótico m
2. (esp US) (= illegal drug) narcoticsestupefacientes mpl, narcóticos mpl
B. ADJnarcótico
narcotic drugnarcótico m
C. CPD narcotics agent Nagente mf de narcóticos
narcotics charge N to be on a narcotics chargeestar acusado de traficar con drogas
narcotics trafficker Nnarcotraficante mf, traficante mf de drogas
narcotics trafficking Nnarcotráfico m, tráfico m de estupefacientes or drogas

narcotic

[nɑːrˈkɒtɪk]
n (MEDICINE)narcotique m narcotics
npl (= illegal drugs) → stupéfiants mpl
adj (MEDICINE) [drug, plant, effect] → narcotiquenarcotics agent nagent m de la brigade des stupéfiantsNarcotics Anonymous nNarcotiques mpl anonymes

narcotic

adj
narcotic substance/drugRauschgift nt
(Med) → narkotisch
n
Rauschgift nt; narcoticsRauschgift nt; (= illegal drugs also)Drogen pl; narcotics industryDrogenindustrie f; the narcotics squaddas Rauschgiftdezernat; narcotics offenceDrogendelikt nt; to be on a narcotics chargewegen eines Drogendelikts angeklagt sein
(Med) → Narkotikum nt

narcotic

[nɑːˈkɒtɪk]
1. adjnarcotico/a
2. n (Med) → narcotico narcotics npl (drugs) → narcotici mpl, stupefacenti mpl

narcotic

(naːˈkotik) noun
a type of drug that stops pain or makes one sleep, often addictive when taken in large doses.

nar·cot·ic

a. narcótico-a, estupefaciente de efecto analgésico que puede producir adicción;
___ blockadebloqueo ___;
___ reversalreversión ___.

narcotic

adj & n narcótico
References in classic literature ?
Yet his presence, his manners, the warmth of his glances, and above all the touch of his lips upon her hand had acted like a narcotic upon her.
The green shutters were closed, the easy-chair was pushed in front of the glass, the maid w as summoned as usual; and the comb assisted the mistress's reflections, through the medium of the mistress's hair, till heat and idleness asserted their narcotic influences together, and Magdalen fell asleep.
If I had wanted to use anything save narcotic medicines that were poisons in themselves, I would not have administered any of those.
The drought which Reuben administered was of a sedative and narcotic quality, and secured the patient sound and undisturbed slumbers.
Then he mixed a narcotic, and coming over to the bed, said cheerily, "Now, little miss, here is your medicine.
From time to time one of the smokers, overcome with the narcotic, would slip under the table, whereupon the waiters, taking him by the head and feet, carried and laid him upon the bed.
One evening he mixed a powerful narcotic with my water.
Monte Cristo for some time kept his eyes fixed on the young girl, who gradually fell asleep, yielding to the effects of the narcotic the count had given her.
But for the last few weeks a new influence had come over Hetty-- vague, atmospheric, shaping itself into no self-confessed hopes or prospects, but producing a pleasant narcotic effect, making her tread the ground and go about her work in a sort of dream, unconscious of weight or effort, and showing her all things through a soft, liquid veil, as if she were living not in this solid world of brick and stone, but in a beatified world, such as the sun lights up for us in the waters.
Every one seemed to be under the influence of some narcotic.
If it is, we shall have to give Lady Caversham a narcotic.
He watched her pretty and unconscious munching through the skeins of smoke that pervaded the tent, and Tess Durbeyfield did not divine, as she innocently looked down at the roses in her bosom, that there behind the blue narcotic haze was potentially the "tragic mischief" of her drama--one who stood fair to be the blood-red ray in the spectrum of her young life.