narrate

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nar·rate

 (năr′āt′, nă-rāt′)
tr.v. nar·rat·ed, nar·rat·ing, nar·rates
1. To give an account of (events, for example) in speech or writing or by means of images. See Synonyms at describe.
2. To supply a running commentary for (a documentary or performance, for example).

[Latin narrāre, narrāt-, from gnārus, knowing; see gnō- in Indo-European roots.]

nar′rat·a·bil′i·ty n.
nar′rat·a·ble adj.

narrate

(nəˈreɪt)
vb
1. to tell (a story); relate
2. (Film) to speak in accompaniment of (a film, television programme, etc)
[C17: from Latin narrāre to recount, from gnārus knowing]
narˈratable adj

nar•rate

(ˈnær eɪt, næˈreɪt)

v. -rat•ed, -rat•ing. v.t.
1. to give an account or tell the story of (events, experiences, etc.).
2. to add a spoken commentary to (a film, television program, etc.).
v.i.
3. to relate or recount events, experiences, etc., in speech or writing.
[1650–60; < Latin narrātus, past participle of narrāre to relate, tell, say, derivative of (g)nārus knowing, acquainted with; akin to cognition]

narrate


Past participle: narrated
Gerund: narrating

Imperative
narrate
narrate
Present
I narrate
you narrate
he/she/it narrates
we narrate
you narrate
they narrate
Preterite
I narrated
you narrated
he/she/it narrated
we narrated
you narrated
they narrated
Present Continuous
I am narrating
you are narrating
he/she/it is narrating
we are narrating
you are narrating
they are narrating
Present Perfect
I have narrated
you have narrated
he/she/it has narrated
we have narrated
you have narrated
they have narrated
Past Continuous
I was narrating
you were narrating
he/she/it was narrating
we were narrating
you were narrating
they were narrating
Past Perfect
I had narrated
you had narrated
he/she/it had narrated
we had narrated
you had narrated
they had narrated
Future
I will narrate
you will narrate
he/she/it will narrate
we will narrate
you will narrate
they will narrate
Future Perfect
I will have narrated
you will have narrated
he/she/it will have narrated
we will have narrated
you will have narrated
they will have narrated
Future Continuous
I will be narrating
you will be narrating
he/she/it will be narrating
we will be narrating
you will be narrating
they will be narrating
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been narrating
you have been narrating
he/she/it has been narrating
we have been narrating
you have been narrating
they have been narrating
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been narrating
you will have been narrating
he/she/it will have been narrating
we will have been narrating
you will have been narrating
they will have been narrating
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been narrating
you had been narrating
he/she/it had been narrating
we had been narrating
you had been narrating
they had been narrating
Conditional
I would narrate
you would narrate
he/she/it would narrate
we would narrate
you would narrate
they would narrate
Past Conditional
I would have narrated
you would have narrated
he/she/it would have narrated
we would have narrated
you would have narrated
they would have narrated
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.narrate - provide commentary for a film, for example
inform - impart knowledge of some fact, state or affairs, or event to; "I informed him of his rights"
2.narrate - narrate or give a detailed account ofnarrate - narrate or give a detailed account of; "Tell what happened"; "The father told a story to his child"
inform - impart knowledge of some fact, state or affairs, or event to; "I informed him of his rights"
relate - give an account of; "The witness related the events"
crack - tell spontaneously; "crack a joke"
yarn - tell or spin a yarn
rhapsodise, rhapsodize - recite a rhapsody

narrate

verb tell, recount, report, detail, describe, relate, unfold, chronicle, recite, set forth The film is a story about power, narrated by an old sailor.

narrate

verb
To give a verbal account of:
Translations
vyprávětvypravovat
fortælle
kertoa
elbeszélelmond
segja sögu
atpasakotikomentavimaspasakotipasakotojas
pārstāstītstāstīt
anlatmak

narrate

[nəˈreɪt] VT [+ documentary] → narrar, hacer los comentarios de; [+ story] → narrar, relatar

narrate

[nəˈreɪt] vtraconter, narrer

narrate

vterzählen; events, journey etcschildern

narrate

[nəˈreɪt] vtnarrare, raccontare

narrate

(nəˈreit) verb
to tell (a story). He narrated the events of the afternoon.
narˈration noun
narrative (ˈnarətiv) noun
a story. an exciting narrative.
narˈrator noun
1. a person who tells a story.
2. a person who tells you what is happening or explains something in a film.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ernestine's life story is worth recounting, for its closed-endedness and narratability help to distinguish her from Milly.
The fifth essay explores the relationship between scientific concepts of nonseparability and the theory of relativity and the philosophical concept of narratability.
Brooks calls the relation between "initiatory desire" and the "deathlike ending," when narratability ceases, "Freud's own masterplot" (96), where repetitions fill the space of the middle.
See also Morson, Hidden in Plain View: Narrative and Creative Potentials in War and Peace (Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 1987), which takes as one point of departure the dilemma posed by the "falsity of narrative that forces each historian to adopt a specific genre, in the process "sacrific[ing] truth for narratability and simplicity" (102-3).
Narratability and career construction: empirical evidence of intervention effectiveness.
Narrativehood Narrativeness Narrativity Narratability.
The recourse to Deleuze and Logique du sens, in shifting the focus away from the actual and the thematic and toward the virtual and the conceptual, registers in the battle scenes an array of autoreferential reflections on problems of literary effability, narratability, and describability.
The constructs of identity, adaptability, intentionality, and narratability contribute to the formulation of a new model for comprehending vocational behavior, namely, career construction theory (Savickas, 2005b).
The church is crucial for sustaining claims of the narratability of the world.
Stael confronts the question of trauma and narratability explicitly in the text of the Considerations, and those confrontations suggest that we resist reading the work in purely symptomatic terms.
Clarke's Childhood's End, and Carl Sagan's Contact), Clarke shows that the perspective of a properly neocybernetic narratology reveals how the literary text reports on its own systemic conditions of emergence, the conditions of its narratability, and hence the structuration of its own readership--namely, us: