narrate

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nar·rate

 (năr′āt′, nă-rāt′)
tr.v. nar·rat·ed, nar·rat·ing, nar·rates
1. To give an account of (events, for example) in speech or writing or by means of images. See Synonyms at describe.
2. To supply a running commentary for (a documentary or performance, for example).

[Latin narrāre, narrāt-, from gnārus, knowing; see gnō- in Indo-European roots.]

nar′rat·a·bil′i·ty n.
nar′rat·a·ble adj.

narrate

(nəˈreɪt)
vb
1. to tell (a story); relate
2. (Film) to speak in accompaniment of (a film, television programme, etc)
[C17: from Latin narrāre to recount, from gnārus knowing]
narˈratable adj

nar•rate

(ˈnær eɪt, næˈreɪt)

v. -rat•ed, -rat•ing. v.t.
1. to give an account or tell the story of (events, experiences, etc.).
2. to add a spoken commentary to (a film, television program, etc.).
v.i.
3. to relate or recount events, experiences, etc., in speech or writing.
[1650–60; < Latin narrātus, past participle of narrāre to relate, tell, say, derivative of (g)nārus knowing, acquainted with; akin to cognition]

narrate


Past participle: narrated
Gerund: narrating

Imperative
narrate
narrate
Present
I narrate
you narrate
he/she/it narrates
we narrate
you narrate
they narrate
Preterite
I narrated
you narrated
he/she/it narrated
we narrated
you narrated
they narrated
Present Continuous
I am narrating
you are narrating
he/she/it is narrating
we are narrating
you are narrating
they are narrating
Present Perfect
I have narrated
you have narrated
he/she/it has narrated
we have narrated
you have narrated
they have narrated
Past Continuous
I was narrating
you were narrating
he/she/it was narrating
we were narrating
you were narrating
they were narrating
Past Perfect
I had narrated
you had narrated
he/she/it had narrated
we had narrated
you had narrated
they had narrated
Future
I will narrate
you will narrate
he/she/it will narrate
we will narrate
you will narrate
they will narrate
Future Perfect
I will have narrated
you will have narrated
he/she/it will have narrated
we will have narrated
you will have narrated
they will have narrated
Future Continuous
I will be narrating
you will be narrating
he/she/it will be narrating
we will be narrating
you will be narrating
they will be narrating
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been narrating
you have been narrating
he/she/it has been narrating
we have been narrating
you have been narrating
they have been narrating
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been narrating
you will have been narrating
he/she/it will have been narrating
we will have been narrating
you will have been narrating
they will have been narrating
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been narrating
you had been narrating
he/she/it had been narrating
we had been narrating
you had been narrating
they had been narrating
Conditional
I would narrate
you would narrate
he/she/it would narrate
we would narrate
you would narrate
they would narrate
Past Conditional
I would have narrated
you would have narrated
he/she/it would have narrated
we would have narrated
you would have narrated
they would have narrated
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.narrate - provide commentary for a film, for example
inform - impart knowledge of some fact, state or affairs, or event to; "I informed him of his rights"
2.narrate - narrate or give a detailed account ofnarrate - narrate or give a detailed account of; "Tell what happened"; "The father told a story to his child"
inform - impart knowledge of some fact, state or affairs, or event to; "I informed him of his rights"
relate - give an account of; "The witness related the events"
crack - tell spontaneously; "crack a joke"
yarn - tell or spin a yarn
rhapsodise, rhapsodize - recite a rhapsody

narrate

verb tell, recount, report, detail, describe, relate, unfold, chronicle, recite, set forth The film is a story about power, narrated by an old sailor.

narrate

verb
To give a verbal account of:
Translations
vyprávětvypravovat
fortælle
kertoa
elbeszélelmond
segja sögu
atpasakotikomentavimaspasakotipasakotojas
pārstāstītstāstīt
anlatmak

narrate

[nəˈreɪt] VT [+ documentary] → narrar, hacer los comentarios de; [+ story] → narrar, relatar

narrate

[nəˈreɪt] vtraconter, narrer

narrate

vterzählen; events, journey etcschildern

narrate

[nəˈreɪt] vtnarrare, raccontare

narrate

(nəˈreit) verb
to tell (a story). He narrated the events of the afternoon.
narˈration noun
narrative (ˈnarətiv) noun
a story. an exciting narrative.
narˈrator noun
1. a person who tells a story.
2. a person who tells you what is happening or explains something in a film.
References in periodicals archive ?
I have been for a long time", calls to mind Delbo's words, "I died at Auschwitz, but no one knows it" and Ernst van Alphen's (35) observation that "the basic feeling of being dead, or of continuing living as a dead person, is not narratable [.
Each page bears a wealth of diverse knowledge-not subordinated but not narratable.
In fact, in that nation and narrative are mutually self-constituting, they mark the limit into which form and content dissolve into one; as Koselleck has argued, the turn towards the history-as-progress narrative in eighteenth-century Europe converted the very notion of the "republic" from a structural condition to a narratable event.
Here, Goldie brings in his breakthrough work on the emotions, arguing that grief--like (he suggests) other emotions is essentially a process that integrates a variety of disparate states, judgments, and events into a coherent and narratable whole.
Beyond being sufficiently clear and insufficiently present, the final and unspoken quality of the ideal disaster is that it be narratable as a disaster.
Baer also refers here to Walter Benjamin whose "The Storyteller" diagnosed this turning point in the conceptualization of history as "the end of the art of story-telling" and the overall decline "of narratable history in response to modern experiences of shock" (Baer 4).
Further, Young's discussion of romantic narrative could apply equally to the sitcom: "the happy state toward which the action of the plot has been directed is [always] lived elsewhere, outside the boundary of the narratable present" (9).
She considers letters to friend and student Ursula Tyrwhitt and lover and mentor Auguste Rodin and others (as well as other sources) through Foucault's theory of power, Deleuze and Guattari's analytics of desire, and Caverero's concept of the narratable self, addressing the use of letters as documents of life in narrative research, the concept of love and how it shows up in her letters, the dynamics of space as she moved from London to Paris, her nude self-portraits and work as an art model, and her relationships with cats as they provided continuity in her life.
Only when the six-four hexagrams are arranged in chronological order are their relationships narratable, and only then is Yijing able to narrate the changes and developments of fate from a higher vantage point.
Drawing on Mieke Bal's distinction between "narrative memory" as "social construction," and thus narratable, and "traumatic memory" as "inflexible and invariable" and "addressed to nobody" in other words, essentially hidden (Bal x), the point can be made that Kyomuhendo's fictions work as "narrative memory" that tell of the "traumatic memory" of persons traumatized by extreme violence.
In other words, the meaning of the poem is a reflexive and anguished uncertainty about the nature of poetry itself, a pure lyric refusal of constative or narratable content.
During Petrarchism's long period in the wilderness, critical attention tended to be confined to poets capable of sustaining the label of "transgressive" (Gaspara Stampa, Michelangelo), or those with a narratable life (or death) capable of reflecting biographical drama onto the verse (Isabella da Morra).