narrational


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nar·ra·tion

 (nă-rā′shən)
n.
1. The act, process, or an instance of narrating.
2. Narrated material.

nar·ra′tion·al adj.
nar·ra′tion·al·ly adv.

narrational

(nəˈreɪʃənəl) or

narratory

adj
(Literary & Literary Critical Terms) acting to narrate
References in periodicals archive ?
Despite the book's chronological and narrational irregularities, the reader's natural urge to make connections between these disparate segments of text, to convert this sequence of varying narratives into a larger overarching narrative, is given encouragement by various connective devices in the book.
Moreover, no matter when Bellonci recalls the reader to this room in the novel's second narrational frame, the year is always 1533.
51-84)--are all better regarded as true commentaries, participant voices in the overall narrational enterprise, than as budding "literary criticism," as we know it in our own time and place.
Though this narrational technique matures in Billy and Holly, here it has the quality of A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, though with the voices of French's earlier, more innocent selves embedded in the narrative, as opposed to being developed in linear fashion, as they are by Joyce.
Historical and historical/intentional theories, such as Noel Carroll's narrational theory, Jerrold Levinson's intentional theory, James D.
On the narrational level, the story has the frame of a detective novel which, in true nouveau roman fashion, identifies neither the crime nor the criminal of the traditional police thriller.
Yet from our postmodern, post-Holocaust perspective - and aided by subtle forms of conceit that always accompany the study of one's own century - we have attacked narrative with a vengeance that often ignores the undeniable endurance of the narrational mode.
The parts of the novel where the satire is narrational rather than Nashian are two: the first chapter (which is prior to Gabriel's advent) and those treating Nick's political mentor Mr.
Ramsay's mode of being, as it characterizes the narrational posture of To the Lighthouse, which nevertheless uses this ontology, this opening onto, to expose the physical self-sacrifice enacted by Mrs.
Although this might seem to be overtaxing the significance of the text, it is certainly noteworthy here that Oedipus himself, in giving an answer to the riddle of the Sphinx and thus acquiring his kingdom, names the rudiments of narrational structure, telling the terrifying She-Monster that a man's life has continuity as a beginning, a middle, and an end, as a locus of finitude bound by death.
THESE INCLUDE MATTERS SUCH AS HOW'GREEN ROOM' EFFECTS WERE ACHIEVED THROUGH INGENIOUS CAMERA PRACTICE OR HOW THE NARRATIONAL VOICE OF THE FILM'S MAKER WAS DEPLOYED.
Through the chapter, D'Cruz and Ross's careful, nuanced readings of these novels, in thematic and narrational terms, support a strong argument about the ways in which all three authors contribute to "the project of historicizing the fictional representation of female subjectivity" (296)--Maori and Pakeha--in New Zealand fiction.