narrative


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nar·ra·tive

 (năr′ə-tĭv)
n.
1. A narrated account; a story.
2. The art, technique, or process of narrating: the highest form of narrative.
3.
a. A presentation of real-world events that connects them in a storylike way: "There has been less of a coherent, connected media narrative and more of a kind of episodic focus on events, controversies and gaffes" (Mark Jurkowitz).
b. An explanation or interpretation of events in accordance with a particular theory, ideology, or point of view: the competing narratives of capitalism and Marxism.
adj.
1. Consisting of or characterized by the telling of a story: narrative poetry.
2. Of or relating to narration: narrative skill.

nar′ra·tive·ly adv.

narrative

(ˈnærətɪv)
n
1. an account, report, or story, as of events, experiences, etc
2. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) the narrative the part of a literary work that relates events
3. the process or technique of narrating
adj
4. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) telling a story: a narrative poem.
5. of or relating to narration: narrative art.
ˈnarratively adv

nar•ra•tive

(ˈnær ə tɪv)

n.
1. a story or account of events, experiences, or the like, whether true or fictitious.
2. the art, technique, or process of narrating.
adj.
3. consisting of or being a narrative: narrative poetry.
4. of or pertaining to narration.
5. representing stories or events pictorially or sculpturally: narrative painting.
[1555–65; < Latin]
nar′ra•tive•ly, adv.

narrative

  • narratage - The technique of having one character in the role of storyteller or the act of inserting bits of explanation into a narrative.
  • narrative - First an adjective meaning "telling the facts of a story," from Latin narrare, which is also the base of narrate.
  • saga - Old Norse for "narrative."
  • diegesis - The narrative or plot.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.narrative - a message that tells the particulars of an act or occurrence or course of eventsnarrative - a message that tells the particulars of an act or occurrence or course of events; presented in writing or drama or cinema or as a radio or television program; "his narrative was interesting"; "Disney's stories entertain adults as well as children"
tearjerker - an excessively sentimental narrative
subject matter, content, message, substance - what a communication that is about something is about
tall tale - an improbable (unusual or incredible or fanciful) story
folk tale, folktale - a tale circulated by word of mouth among the common folk
sob story, sob stuff - a sentimental story (or drama) of personal distress; designed to arouse sympathy
fairy story, fairy tale, fairytale - a story about fairies; told to amuse children
nursery rhyme - a tale in rhymed verse for children
Adj.1.narrative - consisting of or characterized by the telling of a storynarrative - consisting of or characterized by the telling of a story; "narrative poetry"
communicatory, communicative - able or tending to communicate; "was a communicative person and quickly told all she knew"- W.M.Thackeray

narrative

noun story, report, history, detail, account, statement, tale, chronicle, recital He began his narrative with the day of the murder.

narrative

noun
Translations
رِوائي، قَصَصي
historkanaracenarativnípříběhvyprávěcí
fortælling
jutustus
kertomus
saga, frásögn
物語
breedsprakigspraakzaamverhaalverhalendverslag

narrative

[ˈnærətɪv]
A. ADJnarrativo
B. N (= act) → narración f; (= story) → narración f, relato m

narrative

[ˈnærətɪv]
nrécit m
adj [style, poem] → narratif/ive

narrative

n
(= story)Erzählung f; (= account)Schilderung f; (= text)Text m
(= act of narrating)Erzählen nt; (of events, journey)Schilderung f; he has a gift for narrativeer ist ein talentierter Erzähler
adjerzählend; ability etcerzählerisch; narrative poemBallade f; (modern) → Erzählgedicht nt; narrative structureErzählstruktur f

narrative

[ˈnærətɪv]
1. adjnarrativo/a
2. nnarrazione f; (technique) → narrativa

narrate

(nəˈreit) verb
to tell (a story). He narrated the events of the afternoon.
narˈration noun
narrative (ˈnarətiv) noun
a story. an exciting narrative.
narˈrator noun
1. a person who tells a story.
2. a person who tells you what is happening or explains something in a film.
References in classic literature ?
It is his narrative, or one based on it, that I have given you.
My own story was never written, but the following narrative is Jim's manuscript, substantially as he brought it to me.
Numberless recent massacres were still vivid in their recollections; nor was there any ear in the provinces so deaf as not to have drunk in with avidity the narrative of some fearful tale of midnight murder, in which the natives of the forests were the principal and barbarous actors.
Were these to be worthily recounted, they would form a narrative of no small interest and instruction, and possessing, moreover, a certain remarkable unity, which might almost seem the result of artistic arrangement.
It will be seen, likewise, that this Custom-House sketch has a certain propriety, of a kind always recognised in literature, as explaining how a large portion of the following pages came into my possession, and as offering proofs of the authenticity of a narrative therein contained.
It appeared that the narrative he had promised to read us really required for a proper intelligence a few words of prologue.
This man interested me at once; and since the sea-gods had ordained that he should soon become my shipmate (though but a sleeping-partner one, so far as this narrative is concerned), I will here venture upon a little description of him.
The thing is common in that fishery; and in the sequel of the narrative, it will then be seen what like abandonment befell myself.
Marks, who was anxiously and with much fidgeting compounding a tumbler of punch to his own peculiar taste, occasionally looked up from his employment, and, poking his sharp nose and chin almost into Haley's face, gave the most earnest heed to the whole narrative.
MAINLY the Round Table talk was monologues -- narrative accounts of the adventures in which these prisoners were captured and their friends and backers killed and stripped of their steeds and armor.
In the month of August, 1841, I attended an anti- slavery convention in Nantucket, at which it was my happiness to become acquainted with FREDERICK DOUGLASS, the writer of the following Narrative.
Martin, who bore a part in the narrative, and was always mentioned with approbation for his great goodnature in doing something or other, was a single man; that there was no young Mrs.