narratology

(redirected from narratologists)

narratology

(ˌnærəˈtɒlədʒɪ)
n
(Literary & Literary Critical Terms) the study of narrative and narrative structure
References in periodicals archive ?
It draws on Western philosophers, Chinese theorists, and theorists of critical theory, new historicism, and cultural studies, in addition to narratologists, to analyze how the writers manipulate dark moods and limit-situations like death and suffering, along with other motifs, to illustrate the historical authenticity and transcendent truth in their fiction.
To counteract these perceptions, narratologists often promote the export value of narrative theory in terms of the transferable utility of its method.
She challenges the conflation of "natural" and "mimetic," as well as "unnatural" and "anti-mimetic," that she sees framing the approach of unnatural narratologists.
It must be stated, however, that Chinese narratologists like Nie Zhenzhao and Shang Biwu have lately caught up with international developments.
Cognitive and evolutionary narratologists (such as Patrick Colm Hogan or Brian Boyd) will tell you that they capture universal human concerns and interpersonal relations that are fundamental to the human experience.
More intent on leading his life rather than documenting it, Carlebach consequently lived mainly through the stories of others, becoming the center of a variety of worldviews and fitting a range of what narratologists might recognize as motifs: Carlebach as the descendant of "a long line of rabbis," as a child prodigy, as a Holocaust escapee, as a Hasidic revivalist, as an authentic Hasid, as a troubled Hasid, as a Holy Beggar, as a folksinger, as an interventionist, as enabling the best in people, as an untrained musician, as a singing/dancing rabbi, as a selfless giver, as a Lamed Vavnik, as an Orthodox deviant, as a neo-Kabbalist, as a storyteller, and so on and so forth.
The goal of the Intelligent Narrative Technologies workshop was to bring together a diverse community of computer scientists, narratologists, psychologists, artists, and game industry practitioners to discuss the generation, analysis, and understanding of interactive and noninteractive stories.
With an emphasis on features such as modes of discourse, points of view, framing devices, and footnotes, narratologists have long been devoted to the scrutiny of texts' structural DNA.
This emphasis on the sense-making activity of the reader brings the cognitive narratologists close to issues at home in the hermeneutic tradition, the leading theoreticians of which seem hardly to share the cognitivists' ambition to build bridges between the human and the natural sciences.
While this definition has long been institutionalized, its postulation of the 'implied author' has never ceased to be a bone of contention between rhetorical narratologists and structuralist/cognitive narratologists.
Perez-Simon also establishes a dialogue between Veltrusky's work and the Spanish scholars Maria del Carmen Bobes-Naves and Jose Luis Garcia Barrientos, as well as discussing Gerard Genette's strict separation between narrative (diegesis) and drama (mimesis) in the light of studies by narratologists such as Marie-Laure Ryan, Seymour Chatman and Manfred Jahn.
Feminist narratologist Susan Snaider Lanser (1992) has explained that while both feminist scholars and narrative theorists place a high premium on the importance of narrative voice, their projects are often at odds with one another insofar as narratologists "are usually concerned with formal structures and not with the causes, ideologies, or social implications of particular narrative practices" (p.