native-born


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na·tive-born

(nā′tĭv-bôrn′)
adj.
Belonging to a place by birth.

native-born

adj
born in the country or area indicated

na′tive-born′



adj.
born in the place indicated.
[1490–1500]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.native-born - belonging to a place by birth; "a native-born Scot"; "a native Scot"
native - characteristic of or existing by virtue of geographic origin; "the native North American sugar maple"; "many native artists studied abroad"
References in classic literature ?
He learned to wash himself with the Levitical scrupulosity of the native-born, who in his heart considers the Englishman rather dirty.
And every tale was told in the even, passionless voice of the native-born, mixed with quaint reflections, borrowed unconsciously from native foster-mothers, and turns of speech that showed they had been that instant translated from the vernacular.
I should think," said Laurence, "that the people would have petitioned the king always to appoint a native-born New-Englander to govern them.
Perhaps she didn’t understand you, woman; you are none of the best linguister; and then Miss Lizzy has been exercising the king’s English under a great Lon’on lady, and, for that matter, can talk the language almost as well as myself, or any native-born British subject.
It so happened that a native-born son of the valley, many years before, had enlisted as a soldier, and, after a great deal of hard fighting, had now become an illustrious commander.
They show absolutely nothing of the finer feeling which adds so much, for example, to the descriptions in Scott's somewhat similar romances, and they are separated by all the breadth of the world from the realm of delicate sensation and imagination to which Spenser and Keats and all the genuine poets are native-born.
He and the two mates, are as I learn, the only native-born Americans in the ship.
Meanwhile, tech companies support more H-1Bs, but some workers oppose the program, believing that it steals jobs and/or reduces wages for native-born Americans.
The rising share of immigrants in construction, says NAHB economist Natalia Siniavskaia, is attributable to "a slow, delayed and reluctant post-recession return of native-born workers.
companies rest almost exclusively on foreign-born labor, with little credit given to the native-born labor force.
The impact of foreign-born workers on the native-born workforce in a local labor market has been investigated in a number of research studies, but the impact and its magnitude are as yet unclear.
In research funded by the Kauffmann Foundation, Liu and Painter (2016) found that mobility rates of immigrants have fallen dramatically and are now lower than the rates of native-born households.