natural history


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Related to natural history: Field Museum of Natural History, Natural history of disease

natural history

n.
1. The study and description of organisms and natural objects, especially their origins, evolution, and interrelationships.
2.
a. A collection of facts about the development of a natural process or entity: the natural history of tuberculosis.
b. A work or treatise containing such facts.

natural history

n
1. (Biology) the study of animals and plants in the wild state
2. (Biology) the study of all natural phenomena
3. (Biology) the sum of these phenomena in a given place or at a given time: the natural history of Iran.
natural historian n

nat′ural his′tory


n.
the study of organisms and natural objects, esp. with reference to their history and native environment.
[1560–70]

natural history

The study and description of living things and natural objects, especially their origins, evolution, and relationships to one another. Natural history includes the sciences of zoology, mineralogy, geology, and paleontology.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.natural history - the scientific study of plants or animals (more observational than experimental) usually published in popular magazines rather than in academic journalsnatural history - the scientific study of plants or animals (more observational than experimental) usually published in popular magazines rather than in academic journals
science, scientific discipline - a particular branch of scientific knowledge; "the science of genetics"
Translations
التّاريخ الطَّبيعي
přírodopis
naturhistorie
természetrajz
náttúrufræîi
prírodopis
doğabilimtabiat bilgisi

natural history

nstoria naturale

natural

(ˈnӕtʃərəl) adjective
1. of or produced by nature, not made by men. Coal, oil etc are natural resources; Wild animals are happier in their natural state than in a zoo.
2. born in a person. natural beauty; He had a natural ability for music.
3. (of manner) simple, without pretence. a nice, natural smile.
4. normal; as one would expect. It's quite natural for a boy of his age to be interested in girls.
5. of a musical note, not sharp or flat. G natural is lower in pitch than G sharp.
noun
1. a person who is naturally good at something.
2. in music (a sign ( ) indicating) a note which is not to be played sharp or flat.
ˈnaturalist noun
a person who studies animal and plant life.
ˈnaturally adverb
1. of course; as one would expect. Naturally I didn't want to risk missing the train.
2. by nature; as a natural characteristic. She is naturally kind.
3. normally; in a relaxed way. Although he was nervous, he behaved quite naturally.
natural gas
gas suitable for burning, found underground or under the sea.
natural history
the study of plants and animals.
natural resources
sources of energy, wealth etc which occur naturally and are not made by man, eg coal, oil, forests etc.
References in classic literature ?
As I feel that the opportunities which I enjoyed of studying the Natural History of the different countries we visited, have been wholly due to Captain Fitz Roy, I hope I may here be permitted to repeat my expression of gratitude to him; and to add that, during the five years we were together, I received from him the most cordial friendship and steady assistance.
I told him my name, Edward Prendick, and how I had taken to Natural History as a relief from the dulness of my comfortable independence.
Nor are the most conscientious compilations of Natural History for the benefit of the young and tender, free from the same heinousness of mistake.
In virtue of my office as Assistant Professor in the Museum of Natural History in Paris, the French Government had attached me to that expedition.
In one moment I've seen what has hitherto been Enveloped in absolute mystery, And without extra charge I will give you at large A Lesson in Natural History.
There were tigers and elephants and bears and wolves and foxes and all the others in the natural history, and for a moment Dorothy was afraid.
All the papers, pamphlets, reports-- all the journals published by the scientific, literary, and religious societies enlarged upon its advantages; and the Society of Natural History of Boston, the Society of Science and Art of Albany, the Geographical and Statistical Society of New York, the Philosophical Society of Philadelphia, and the Smithsonian of Washington sent innumerable letters of congratulation to the Gun Club, together with offers of immediate assistance and money.
His deference to this particular branch of science had induced him to listen to the application of a medical man, whose thirst for natural history had led him to the desire of profiting by the migratory propensities of the squatter.
I have never had time to give myself much to natural history.
Wallace, who is now studying the natural history of the Malay archipelago, has arrived at almost exactly the same general conclusions that I have on the origin of species.
The leave of absence which you have asked for the purpose of enabling you to carry into execution your designs of exploring the country to the Rocky Mountains, and beyond with a view of assertaining the nature and character of the various tribes of Indians inhabiting those regions; the trade which might be profitably carried on with them, the quality of the soil, the productions, the minerals, the natural history, the climate, the Geography, and Topography, as well as Geology of the various parts of the Country within the limits of the Territories belonging to the United States, between our frontier, and the Pacific; has been duly considered, and submitted to the War Department, for approval, and has been sanctioned.
He here paused for a moment, stepped to a book-case, and brought forth one of the ordinary synopses of Natural History.

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