natural virtues

natural virtues

pl n
(Theology) (esp among the scholastics) those virtues of which man is capable without direct help from God, specifically justice, temperance, prudence, and fortitude. Compare theological virtues
References in periodicals archive ?
In Christianity, natural virtues are seen to play a part within a greater whole founded on the theological virtues in general and charity in particular.
As a Catholic priest, Aquinas necessarily rejected the idea that natural virtues could secure the eternal salvation available only through Jesus Christ.
There is plenty of room, in other words, for social and religious conservatives to learn from the sober analyses of the Austrians--the only school of empirical economic thought that takes seriously human dignity, personal responsibility, and the role of the natural virtues in promoting the common good.
The Tuscan Jesuit sought to deny his Tibetan hosts and interlocutors the ability to assert their claims to what Desideri might define as prevenient grace, the assistance given by God to those seeking Him without their direct knowledge, but who gain--by their unwitting good will to seek the ultimate truth--the benefits of natural virtues.
Yet, the natural virtues are now put to the service of a new end by their existence in a new type of person.
Today, the entire process is conducted following not only the strict Norwegian regulations, but also the HACCP international procedures reinforcing the protection of the natural virtues of Ascophyllum Nodosum.
Natural virtues provide non-moral motives for action, i.
Many of the natural virtues that Hume identifies, such as prudence, temperance, greatness of mind, cheerfulness, and so on, redound primarily to the benefit of the person who has them, but one of the most important natural virtues, benevolence, is a ground of our duty to be helpful and kind to others.
The natural virtues of benevolence and prudence while effective in a small society are not enough by themselves to start the process of sympathy in a large society.
For Thomas the natural virtues like courage, prudence, and justice can be acquired through education and effort, but these lie barren in the quest for final happiness without the important class of infused theological virtues of faith, hope, and love, which are attained also through effort but come to us finally as gifts of divine grace.
But there is more: Thomas connects the intellectual virtues, which Aristotle had mentioned, with the gifts of the Holy Spirit, indicating that the natural virtues find their fulfillment through divine grace.