naturalism


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Related to naturalism: realism

nat·u·ral·ism

 (năch′ər-ə-lĭz′əm, năch′rə-)
n.
1. Factual or realistic representation, especially:
a. The practice of describing precisely the actual circumstances of human life in literature.
b. The practice of reproducing subjects as precisely as possible in the visual arts.
2.
a. A movement or school advocating such precise representation.
b. The principles and methods of such a movement or of its adherents.
3. Philosophy The system of thought holding that all phenomena can be explained in terms of natural causes and laws.
4. Theology The doctrine that all religious truths are derived from nature and natural causes and not from revelation.
5. Conduct or thought prompted by natural desires or instincts.

naturalism

(ˈnætʃrəˌlɪzəm; -tʃərə-)
n
1. (Art Movements)
a. a movement, esp in art and literature, advocating detailed realistic and factual description, esp that in 19th-century France in the writings of Zola, Flaubert, etc
b. the characteristics or effects of this movement
2. (Literary & Literary Critical Movements)
a. a movement, esp in art and literature, advocating detailed realistic and factual description, esp that in 19th-century France in the writings of Zola, Flaubert, etc
b. the characteristics or effects of this movement
3. (Art Movements) a school of painting or sculpture characterized by the faithful imitation of appearances for their own sake
4. (Theology) the belief that all religious truth is based not on revelation but rather on the study of natural causes and processes
5. (Philosophy) philosophy
a. a scientific account of the world in terms of causes and natural forces that rejects all spiritual, supernatural, or teleological explanations
b. the meta-ethical thesis that moral properties are reducible to natural ones, or that ethical judgments are derivable from nonethical ones. Compare naturalistic fallacy, descriptivism
6. action or thought caused by natural desires and instincts
7. devotion to that which is natural

nat•u•ral•ism

(ˈnætʃ ər əˌlɪz əm, ˈnætʃ rə-)

n.
1. a literary style combining a deterministic view of human nature and a nonidealistic, detailed observation of events.
2. (in a work of art) treatment of forms, colors, space, etc., as they appear or might appear in nature.
3. the theory of literary or artistic naturalism.
4. Philos. the belief that all phenomena are covered by laws of science and that all teleological explanations are therefore without value.
6. adherence or attachment to what is natural.
[1635–45]

Naturalism

the goal of artists who attempt to represent a subject without stylization or interpretation, and to create a mirror for natural beauty. Cf. Verism. Also called Realism. — Naturalist, n.Naturalistic, adj.
See also: Art
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.naturalism - (philosophy) the doctrine that the world can be understood in scientific terms without recourse to spiritual or supernatural explanations
philosophy - the rational investigation of questions about existence and knowledge and ethics
philosophical doctrine, philosophical theory - a doctrine accepted by adherents to a philosophy
2.naturalism - an artistic movement in 19th century France; artists and writers strove for detailed realistic and factual description
art movement, artistic movement - a group of artists who agree on general principles

naturalism

noun realism, authenticity, plausibility, verisimilitude, factualism the closely observed naturalism of this superbly understated tale
Translations

naturalism

[ˈnætʃrəlɪzəm] Nnaturalismo m

naturalism

[ˈnætʃərəlɪzəm] nnaturalisme m

naturalism

nNaturalismus m

naturalism

[ˈnætʃrəˌlɪzm] n (Art, Literature) → naturalismo
References in periodicals archive ?
Baker's main target is the position of scientific naturalism according to which reality can be circumscribed only in terms of properties whose existence is ultimately sanctioned by the methodologies and theories of the various sciences.
The essays treat the following topics: Nietzsche's views on or relationship to aesthetics (essays 1-3), metaethics, (specifically, non-cognitivism and fictionalism) (essays 4-5), compassion and the self (essays 6-8), and naturalism (essay 9).
Contemporary philosophical naturalism and its implications.
Not only does Dworkin seem oblivious to that reality on the ground, he demonstrates a blindness to the true nature of naturalism that prevents him from including naturalists in the breadth of his statement.
Thomas Nagel, atheist Professor of Law and Philosophy at New York University, has delivered a thoroughgoing critique of the philosophical foundations and implications of evolutionary naturalism in his book Mind and Cosmos.
WHERE THE CONFLICT REALLY LIES: Science, Religion, and Naturalism by Alvin Plantinga.
On one side are the environmentalists who, Wapner argues, are captured by the dream of naturalism, a "notion that we live best when we align ourselves with the natural world" (pp.
Thus naturalism cannot explain the existence of reasoning, and in fact cannot be rationally defended since it implies that there are no good reasons for any view, including naturalism itself.
The Evolution of the Human Mind: From Supernaturalism to Naturalism.
American Naturalism and the Jews: Garland, Norris, Dreiser, Wharton, and Cather.
Methodological naturalism is committed to the principle that the "particular state of a physical system must be explained by reference to other physical states of the same system" (80).
The scientific method has assumed the principle of methodolgical naturalism since the sixteenth century.