nature


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Related to nature: science

na·ture

 (nā′chər)
n.
1.
a. The material world and its phenomena: scientists analyzing nature.
b. The forces and processes that produce and control these phenomena: the balance of nature.
2. The world of living things and the outdoors: spent the day enjoying nature.
3. A primitive state of existence, untouched and uninfluenced by civilization or social constraints: when people lived in a state of nature.
4. The basic character or qualities of humanity: It is only human nature to worry about the future.
5. The fundamental character or disposition of a person; temperament: a man of an irascible nature. See Synonyms at disposition.
6. The set of inherent characteristics or properties that distinguish something: trying to determine the nature of a newly discovered phenomenon.
7. A kind or sort: confidences of a personal nature.
8.
a. The processes and functions of the body, as in healing: The doctor decided not to do anything and let nature take its course.
b. Heredity: behavior more influenced by nature than nurture.

[Middle English, essential properties of a thing, from Old French, from Latin nātūra, from nātus, past participle of nāscī, to be born; see genə- in Indo-European roots.]

nature

(ˈneɪtʃə)
n
1. the fundamental qualities of a person or thing; identity or essential character
2. (often capital, esp when personified) the whole system of the existence, arrangement, forces, and events of all physical life that are not controlled by man
3. (Biology) all natural phenomena and plant and animal life, as distinct from man and his creations
4. a wild primitive state untouched by man or civilization
5. natural unspoilt scenery or countryside
6. disposition or temperament
7. tendencies, desires, or instincts governing behaviour
8. the normal biological needs or urges of the body
9. sort; kind; character
10. the real appearance of a person or thing: a painting very true to nature.
11. accepted standards of basic morality or behaviour
12. (Biology) biology the complement of genetic material that partly determines the structure of an organism; genotype. Compare nurture3
13. Irish sympathy and fondness for one's own people or native place: she is full of nature.
14. against nature unnatural or immoral
15. by nature essentially or innately
16. call of nature informal euphemistic or jocular the need to urinate or defecate
17. from nature using natural models in drawing, painting, etc
18. in the nature of of the nature of essentially the same as; by way of
[C13: via Old French from Latin nātūra, from nātus, past participle of nascī to be born]

na•ture

(ˈneɪ tʃər)

n.
1. the natural world as it exists without human beings or civilization.
2. the elements of the natural world, as mountains, trees, animals, or rivers.
3. natural scenery.
4. the universe, with all its phenomena.
5. the particular combination of qualities belonging to a person, animal, thing, or class by birth, origin, or constitution; native or inherent character.
6. character, kind, or sort: two books of the same nature.
7. characteristic disposition; temperament: an evil nature.
8. the natural, primitive condition of humankind.
9. biological functions or urges.
10. the laws and principles that guide the universe or an individual.
Idioms:
by nature, as a result of inborn or inherent qualities; innately.
[1200–50; Middle English natur(e) < Old French < Latin nātūra=nāt(us), past participle of nāscī to be born + -ūra -ure]

na·ture

(nā′chər)
1. The world and its naturally occurring phenomena, together with all of the physical laws that govern them.
2. Living organisms and their environments.

Nature

See also earth; environment

the study of the sources and formation of amber. — ambrologic, ambrological, adj.
the assignment of a humanlike soul to nature. — anthropopsychic, adj.
the study of inanimate nature.
the quality of chemical activities, properties, or relationships.
a person who advocates the conservation of the natural resources of a country or region. — conservational, adj.
the science of the causes of natural phenomena. — etiologic, aetiologic, etiological, aetiological, adj.
the worship of nature. — physiolater, n. — physiolatrous, adj.
the body of wisdom about nature.
1. the principle or concept of growth and change in nature.
2. nature considered as the source of growth and change.
3. something that grows or develops.
1. the assignment of a physical form to a god.
2. the deification and worship of natural phenomena; physiolatry.
produced by natural rather than divine or human forces.
a dissertation on the wonders of nature. — thaumatographic, adj.

Nature

 

See Also: FLOWERS, LEAVES, MOON, OCEAN/OCEANFRONT, PONDS AND STREAMS, RAIN, SEASCAPES, SKYSCAPES, SNOW, STARS, SUN, THUNDER AND LIGHTNING, TREES, WEATHER

  1. Big heavy drops [of dew] … lie on the face of the earth like sweat —Shirley Ann Grau
  2. Bushes … like heads; you could have sworn sometimes you saw them mounting and swaying in manly talk —Elizabeth Bowen
  3. The damp stands on the long green grass as thick as morning’s tears —Emily Brontë

    See Also: THICKNESS

  4. The dawn clings to the river like a fog —Yvor Winters
  5. Dew as thick as frost —Paul Theroux
  6. Dew gleamed and sparkled like myriads of tiny mirrors —Dorothy Livesay
  7. The dew is beaded like mercury on the coarsened grass —Adrienne Rich
  8. Dew … like trembling silver leaves —Dame Edith Sitwell
  9. Driftwood gnarled and knobby like old human bones —Charles Johnson
  10. The earth is like the breast of a woman: useful as well as pleasing —Friedrich Nietzsche
  11. Earth was like a jostling festival of seeds grown fat —Wallace Stevens
  12. Flecks of ice still clung to his collar, flashing like brilliants —William H. Gass
  13. Frost was like stiff icing sugar on all the roofs —H. E. Bates
  14. The garden we planted and nurtured through the spring … fills out like an adolescent at summer camp —Ira Wood
  15. The grass like a prophet’s beard, thoughtful and greying —Charles Simic
  16. The grass on the roadside moved under the evening wind, sounding like many pairs of hands rubbed softly together —H. E. Bates
  17. Grass patches … like squares on a game board —Mary Hedin
  18. Grass … thick as wind —David Ignatow
  19. Hedges as solid as walls —Edith Wharton
  20. Here a giant philodendron twined around a sapodilla tree and through the branches of a hibiscus bush like a green arm drawing two friends together —Dorothy Francis
  21. Ice-crystals, shaped like fern-leaves —Anatole France
  22. Light hung in the trees like cobwebs —Jay Parini
  23. The light is in the dark river of the hot spring evening like a dry wine in a decanter —Delmore Schwartz
  24. Like a great poet, Nature knows how to produce the greatest effects with the most limited means —Heinrich Heine
  25. Like a slim reed of crystal, a fountain hung in the dusky air —Oscar Wilde
  26. The moisture in the air seemed suspended like tiny pearls —Rita Mae Brown
  27. Moss that looks and feels like felt —Brad Leithauser
  28. Nature is like a beautiful woman that may be as delightfully and as truly known at a certain distance as upon a closer view —George Santayana

    Santayana expanded on the simile as follows: “As to knowing her through and through, that is nonsense in both cases, and might not reward our pains.”

  29. Nature is like a revolving door: what goes out in one form comes back in another —Anon
  30. Nature like life, she strips men of their pretensions and vanities, exposes the weakness of the weak and the folly of the fool —W. Macneile Dixon
  31. Nature, like lives while they are being lived, is subject to laws of motion; it cannot be stopped and thereby comprehended —Margaret Sutherland
  32. Pebbles [on beach] lit like eggs —Jay Parini
  33. A plant is like a self-willed man, out of whom we can obtain all which we desire, if we will only treat him his own way —Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
  34. A rampant twining vine of wisteria; ancient and knotted like muscles —Marge Piercy
  35. Sea shells as big as melons. Others like peas —John Cheever
  36. The [clam] shells shone like rainbows —Will Weaver
  37. The shrubs burgeon like magic beanstalks —T. Coraghessan Boyle
  38. The soil [being dug with a spade] slices off like fudge —Sharon Sheehe Stark
  39. Sun-baked tomatoes … hung like red balloons filled with water —Anon
  40. The surrounding nature is soundless as if it were under water —Shohei Ooka
  41. Thistles stood looking like prophets in the Bible in Solomon’s house —Eudora Welty
  42. Tiny, sand-sized bits of green moss hung in slanted drifts in the water like grain dust in sunlight —Will Weaver
  43. Trees and flowers that crowded to the path’s edge like children —Helen Hudson
  44. The tufts of moss, like piles of house dust, that hang trembling on the bare winter trees —Elizabeth Hardwick
  45. The twilight seems like a canopy —Erich Maria Remarque
  46. Undergrowth [of a path] spotted with moonlight like a leapord’s skin —Colette
  47. The water rippled like a piece of cloth —William Faulkner
  48. The white of the snow and sky filled my eyes like the sheet pulled over the head of a dead man —Steve Erickson
  49. A white sky made the bare branches of the elms [in March] seem like bones —Louis Auchincloss

nature

1. 'nature'

Nature is used for talking about all living things and natural processes.

I am interested in science and learning about nature's secrets.
We must consider the ecological balance of nature.

When nature has this meaning, don't use 'the' in front of it.

2. 'the country'

Don't use 'nature' to refer to land outside towns and cities. You refer to this land as the country or the countryside.

We live in the country.
We missed the English countryside.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.nature - the essential qualities or characteristics by which something is recognized; "it is the nature of fire to burn"; "the true nature of jealousy"
quality - an essential and distinguishing attribute of something or someone; "the quality of mercy is not strained"--Shakespeare
characteristic - a distinguishing quality
2.nature - a causal agent creating and controlling things in the universe; "the laws of nature"; "nature has seen to it that men are stronger than women"
causal agency, causal agent, cause - any entity that produces an effect or is responsible for events or results
3.nature - the natural physical world including plants and animals and landscapes etc.; "they tried to preserve nature as they found it"
cosmos, macrocosm, universe, world, existence, creation - everything that exists anywhere; "they study the evolution of the universe"; "the biggest tree in existence"
4.nature - the complex of emotional and intellectual attributes that determine a person's characteristic actions and reactions; "it is his nature to help others"
trait - a distinguishing feature of your personal nature
personality - the complex of all the attributes--behavioral, temperamental, emotional and mental--that characterize a unique individual; "their different reactions reflected their very different personalities"; "it is his nature to help others"
animal nature, animality - the physical (or animal) side of a person as opposed to the spirit or intellect
disposition, temperament - your usual mood; "he has a happy disposition"
complexion - (obsolete) a combination of elements (of dryness and warmth or of the four humors) that was once believed to determine a person's health and temperament
sociality - the tendency to associate with others and to form social groups; "mammals as a class are not strong on sociality"
5.nature - a particular type of thing; "problems of this type are very difficult to solve"; "he's interested in trains and things of that nature"; "matters of a personal nature"
type - a subdivision of a particular kind of thing; "what type of sculpture do you prefer?"

nature

noun
1. creation, world, earth, environment, universe, cosmos, natural world, Mother Nature, natural forces man's ancient sense of kinship with nature
2. flora and fauna, country, landscape, countryside, scenery, natural history an organization devoted to the protection of nature
3. quality, character, make-up, constitution, attributes, essence, traits, complexion, features The protests had been non-political in nature.
4. temperament, character, personality, disposition, outlook, mood, humour, temper She trusted people. That was her nature.
5. kind, sort, style, type, variety, species, category, description This - and other books of a similar nature - are urgently needed.
Quotations
"nature red in tooth and claw" [Alfred, Lord Tennyson In Memoriam]
"Nature does nothing without purpose or uselessly" [Aristotle Politics]
"You may drive out nature with a pitchfork, yet she'll be constantly running back" [Horace Epistles]
"In nature there are neither rewards nor punishments - there are consequences" [Robert G. Ingersoll Some Reasons Why]
"In her [Nature's] inventions nothing is lacking, and nothing is superfluous" [Leonardo da Vinci]
"`I play for seasons; not eternities!'"
"Says Nature" [George Meredith Modern Love]

nature

noun
1. The totality of all existing things:
2. A class that is defined by the common attribute or attributes possessed by all its members:
Informal: persuasion.
3. The combination of emotional, intellectual, and moral qualities that distinguishes an individual:
4. A basic trait or set of traits that define and establish the character of something:
5. A person's customary manner of emotional response:
Translations
الطَّبيعَهطَبْع، مِزاجطَبِيعَةٌطَبيعَة، نَوْعِيَّةنَوْع
přírodapovahadruhpodstata
naturslagsvæsenindhold
naturo
luontoympäristöluonne
prirodanarav
természet
eîlimanngerînáttúranáttúranumhverfi
自然
자연
natura
būdogamtanatūrapobūdispobūdžio
dabadaba, raksturstipsveidsvide
príroda
naravavrsta
naravpriroda
natur
ธรรมชาติ
tự nhiênbản chấtbản tínhngoài trờitạo hóa

nature

[ˈneɪtʃəʳ]
A. N
1. (= essential quality) [of things] → naturaleza f
the nature and extent of the damage is still not knownaún se desconoce la naturaleza y el alcance de los daños
the project is experimental in natureel proyecto es de carácter experimental
his comment was in the nature of a complimentsu comentario fue algo así como un cumplido
in the nature of things it's impossibledesde el punto de vista lógico es imposible
we were unaware of the serious nature of his illnessignorábamos que su enfermedad fuera tan grave
the true nature of his intentionssus verdaderas intenciones
by its very naturepor su propia naturaleza
see also human C
2. (= character) [of person] → carácter m
she trusted people, that was her naturese fiaba de la gente, era así por naturaleza
to appeal to sb's better natureapelar al buen corazón de algn
to be cautious by natureser cauteloso por naturaleza
she took all their teasing with good natureaceptó todas sus burlas de buen grado
to take advantage of sb's good natureabusar de la amabilidad de algn
it is not in his nature to liementir no es propio de él
see also second 1 A1
3. (= kind, type) something of that naturealgo por el estilo
documents of a technical naturedocumentos mpl de carácter técnico
"nature of contents" (Comm) → descripción f del contenido
4. (= natural life, environment) → naturaleza f
it's against naturees antinatural, es contrario a la naturaleza
the beauties of naturelas maravillas de la naturaleza
to draw/paint from naturedibujar/pintar del natural
to get back to nature [person] → volver a la naturaleza
the laws of naturelas leyes de la naturaleza
to return to nature [area] → volver a su estado natural
fever is nature's way of fighting infectionla fiebre es el mecanismo natural para combatir la infección
see also call A4
see also freak, mother
B. CPD nature conservation Nprotección f de la naturaleza
nature cure Ncuración f natural
nature lover Namante mf de la naturaleza
nature reserve Nreserva f natural
nature study Nestudio m de la historia natural, historia f natural
nature trail Nruta f para el estudio de la naturaleza

nature

[ˈneɪtʃər] n
(= the natural world) → nature f
to be against nature (= unnatural) → être contre nature
to get back to nature → revenir à la nature
(= essential character) [thing] → nature f
the ambitious nature of the programme → la nature ambitieuse du programme
It is the nature of fire to burn
BUT Il est de la nature du feu de brûler.
by its nature (= naturally) → de par sa nature même
Trade unions are by their nature conservative → Les syndicats sont conservateurs de par leur nature même.
(= kind) → nature f
or something of that nature → ou quelque chose de cette nature
to be political in nature → être de nature politique
These problems are economic in nature → Ces problèmes sont de nature économique.
documents of a confidential nature → des documents à caractère confidentiel, des documents de nature confidentielle
(= character, personality) [person] → nature f
in sb's nature
It was not in her nature to tell lies → Ce n'était pas dans sa nature de dire des mensonges.
by nature → par tempérament, de nature
I am an optimist by nature → Je suis optimiste de nature.nature lover namoureux/euse m/f de la naturenature reserve nréserve f naturellenature study n (= school subject) → sciences fpl naturellesnature trail nsentier m de découverte de la nature

nature

n
Natur f; Naturedie Natur; laws of natureNaturgesetze pl; against naturegegen die Natur; in a state of nature (= uncivilized, inf: = naked) → im Naturzustand; to return to nature (person)zur Natur zurückkehren; (garden)in den Naturzustand zurückkehren; to get back to naturezur Natur zurückkehren; to paint from naturenach der Natur malen; nature calls (euph)ich muss mal (inf)
(of person)Wesen (→ sart f) nt, → Natur f; it is not in my nature to say things like thates entspricht nicht meiner Art or meinem Wesen, so etwas zu sagen; it is in the nature of young people to want to traveles liegt im Wesen junger Menschen, reisen zu wollen; cautious by naturevon Natur aus vorsichtig
(of object, material)Beschaffenheit f; it’s in the nature of thingsdas liegt in der Natur der Sache; the nature of the case is such …der Fall liegt so …; that’s the nature of the beast (fig)das ist die Natur dieser Sache; cash is, by its (very) nature, easy to stealGeld ist aufgrund seiner Beschaffenheit leicht zu stehlen
(= type, sort)Art f; things of this naturederartiges; something in the nature of an apologyso etwas wie eine Entschuldigung; … or something of that nature… oder etwas in der Art

nature

:
nature conservancy
nNaturschutz m
nature cure

nature

:
nature lover
nNaturfreund(in) m(f)
nature poet
nNaturdichter(in) m(f)
nature reserve
nature study
nNaturkunde f
nature trail
nature worship

nature

[ˈneɪtʃəʳ]
1. n
a.natura
a law of nature → una legge di natura
the laws of nature → le leggi naturali or della natura
to draw/paint from nature → disegnare/dipingere dal vero
b. (character, of person) → natura, indole f; (of thing) → natura
by nature → per natura, di natura
it is not in his nature to say that → non è nella sua natura or nel suo carattere parlare così
it's second nature to him to do that → gli viene quasi istintivo farlo
c. (kind, type) → natura
things of this nature → cose fpl di questo genere
documents of a confidential nature → documenti mpl di natura riservata
something in the nature of an apology → una specie di scusa

nature

(ˈneitʃə) noun
1. the physical world, eg trees, plants, animals, mountains, rivers etc, or the power which made them. the beauty of nature; the forces of nature; the study of nature.
2. the qualities born in a person; personality. She has a generous nature.
3. quality; what something is or consists of. What is the nature of your work?
4. a kind, type etc. bankers and other people of that nature.
-natured
having a certain type of personality. good-natured; ill-natured.
in the nature of
having the qualities of. His words were in the nature of a threat.

nature

طَبِيعَةٌ příroda natur Natur φύση naturaleza luonto nature priroda natura 自然 자연 natuur natur natura natureza природа natur ธรรมชาติ doğa tự nhiên 自然

nature

n. naturaleza.

nature

n naturaleza
References in classic literature ?
In spite of her small vanities, Margaret had a sweet and pious nature, which unconsciously influenced her sisters, especially Jo, who loved her very tenderly, and obeyed her because her advice was so gently given.
Adolph Myers was meant by nature to be a teacher of youth.
In some way he depended upon the excitement He could arouse in her hysterical nature.
Pontellier was not a woman given to confidences, a characteristic hitherto contrary to her nature.
The facilities which nature had there offered to the march of the combatants were too obvious to be neglected.
In the next place, from reflecting on the circumstance that I doubted, and that consequently my being was not wholly perfect (for I clearly saw that it was a greater perfection to know than to doubt), I was led to inquire whence I had learned to think of something more perfect than myself; and I clearly recognized that I must hold this notion from some nature which in reality was more perfect.
Those things, again, are 'simultaneous' in point of nature, the being of each of which involves that of the other, while at the same time neither is the cause of the other's being.
The inclination to goodness, is imprinted deeply in the nature of man; insomuch, that if it issue not towards men, it will take unto other living creatures; as it is seen in the Turks, a cruel people, who nevertheless are kind to beasts, and give alms, to dogs and birds; insomuch, as Busbechius reporteth, a Christian boy, in Constantinople, had like to have been stoned, for gagging in a waggishness a long-billed fowl.
It is also from natural causes that some beings command and others obey, that each may obtain their mutual safety; for a being who is endowed with a mind capable of reflection and forethought is by nature the superior and governor, whereas he whose excellence is merely corporeal is formect to be a slave; whence it follows that the different state of master [1252b] and slave is equally advantageous to both.
And this hidden truth, that the fountains whence all this river of Time and its creatures floweth are intrinsically ideal and beautiful, draws us to the consideration of the nature and functions of the Poet, or the man of Beauty; to the means and materials he uses, and to the general aspect of the art in the present time.
It has often been charged with inconsistency and fancifulness, and yet has had an elevating effect on human nature, and has exercised a wonderful charm and interest over a few spirits who have been lost in the thought of it.
Bears on natural selection -- The term used in a wide sense -- Geometrical powers of increase -- Rapid increase of naturalised animals and plants -- Nature of the checks to increase -- Competition universal -- Effects of climate -- Protection from the number of individuals -- Complex relations of all animals and plants throughout nature -- Struggle for life most severe between individuals and varieties of the same species; often severe between species of the same genus -- The relation of organism to organism the most important of all relations.