nature worship


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Related to nature worship: ancestor worship

na′ture wor`ship


n.
a religion based on the deification and worship of natural phenomena.
[1865–70]
na′ture wor`shiper, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.nature worship - a system of religion that deifies and worships natural forces and phenomenanature worship - a system of religion that deifies and worships natural forces and phenomena
faith, religion, religious belief - a strong belief in a supernatural power or powers that control human destiny; "he lost his faith but not his morality"
References in periodicals archive ?
It appears to have mutated from halfunderstood gibberish from the usual suspects, creating a poisonous cocktail of nature worship and snobbery.
I bought a couple books on Wicca and Nature Worship, and found that they encouraged the use of natural drugs so I continued.
Bartlett offers a sample of this in his final "Reflections," where he writes that the cult of the saints was directly aimed neither to the immortal gods or the objects of pagan nature worship, but to dead human beings.
In a chapter on American writing, Miller challenges comfortable interpretations of transcendentalist nature worship as a mildly unorthodox revision of Christian reverence for creation or as a prototype of contemporary environmentalism.
In Worcester, bagpipe music summons up memories of deep sorrow and tragic loss of life, so it was a gift to listen to bagpipes blowing joy, nostalgia, nature worship and military camaraderie.
The plot line, a comic book of progressive left politics, captures the Zeitgeist perfectly--business bashing and nature worship.
Shinto, nature worship, originated in Japan and is widely practised across the country, where people worship trees, waterfalls, rocks and even natural sounds.
There is no help from nature worship or from stargazing.
Popular advocacy and condemnation of modern nature worship abounds, but academic accounts of it tend to be scattered in specialist publications often devoted to some other subject area.