naught


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Related to naught: nought, sought

naught

also nought  (nôt)
n.
1. Nonexistence; nothingness.
2. The figure 0; a cipher; a zero.
pron.
Nothing: All their work was for naught.
adj.
1. Nonexistent.
2. Insignificant.

[Middle English, from Old English nāwiht : , no; see ne in Indo-European roots + wiht, thing; see wekti- in Indo-European roots.]

naught

(nɔːt)
n
1. archaic or literary nothing or nothingness; ruin or failure
2. (Mathematics) a variant spelling (esp US) of nought
3. set at naught to have disregard or scorn for; disdain
adv
archaic or literary not at all: it matters naught.
adj
obsolete worthless, ruined, or wicked
[Old English nāwiht, from no1 + wiht thing, person; see wight1, whit]

naught

or nought

(nɔt)

n.
1. nothing.
2. a cipher (0); zero.
adj. Archaic.
3. lost; ruined.
4. worthless; useless.
adv.
5. Obs. not.
Idioms:
come to naught, to end in failure.
[before 900; Middle English; Old English nauht, nāwiht= no1 + wiht thing. compare nought, wight1, whit]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.naught - a quantity of no importancenaught - a quantity of no importance; "it looked like nothing I had ever seen before"; "reduced to nil all the work we had done"; "we racked up a pathetic goose egg"; "it was all for naught"; "I didn't hear zilch about it"
relative quantity - a quantity relative to some purpose
nihil - (Latin) nil; nothing (as used by a sheriff after an unsuccessful effort to serve a writ); "nihil habet"
bugger all, Fanny Adams, fuck all, sweet Fanny Adams - little or nothing at all; "I asked for a raise and they gave me bugger-all"; "I know sweet Fanny Adams about surgery"
2.naught - complete failure; "all my efforts led to naught"
failure - an act that fails; "his failure to pass the test"
Translations
لا شَيء
nicnula
nul
ekkert
niekas
nekas
hiçhiç bir şeysıfır

naught

[nɔːt] N
1. (Math) = nought
2. (o.f., poet) (= nothing) → nada f
all for naughttodo en balde
to come to naught [hopes] → frustrarse; [project] → malograrse
to set at naughtno hacer caso de, despreciar
see also nought

naught

[nɔːt] n
a. (Math) = nought
b. (old) (liter) (nothing) → niente m, nulla m
to come to naught → finire in nulla

naught

(noːt) noun
nothing.
References in classic literature ?
In short, the magnifying influence of fear began to set at naught the calculations of reason, and to render those who should have remembered their manhood, the slaves of the basest passions.
For though I tried to move his arm --unlock his bridegroom clasp --yet, sleeping as he was, he still hugged me tightly, as though naught but death should part us twain.
For blacks, the year's calendar should show naught but three hundred and sixty-five Fourth of Julys and New Year's Days.
This man, too, was paid by the mold--or rather for perfect castings, nearly half his work going for naught.
This thrust did in a most sudden sort close the king's mouth, and he could offer naught to turn the argument; and so, reluctant, and full loth to do you the discourtesy, he yet prayeth you to consider his per- plexed case, as noting how the matter stands, and name the calamity -- if so be you have determined the nature of it and the time of its coming.
He went dreaming about, thinking only of his fairy and caring for naught else in the world.
Cobb, with the air of having visited all the cities of the earth and found them as naught.
Nay, there was naught but her, and she was housekeeper;" and of her, reader, I could not bear to ask the relief for want of which I was sinking; I could not yet beg; and again I crawled away.
If I couldn't keep secrets from th' other lads, secrets about foxes' cubs, an' birds' nests, an' wild things' holes, there'd be naught safe on th' moor.
Madame Defarge was not likely to follow these idiomatic remarks in detail; but, she so far understood them as to perceive that she was set at naught.
I know that my aunt distressed Dora's aunts very much, by utterly setting at naught the dignity of fly-conveyance, and walking out to Putney at extraordinary times, as shortly after breakfast or just before tea; likewise by wearing her bonnet in any manner that happened to be comfortable to her head, without at all deferring to the prejudices of civilization on that subject.
All ye who seek for pleasure, Here find it without measure-- No one to say A body nay, And naught but love and leisure.