nauseous


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nau·seous

 (nô′shəs, -zē-əs)
adj.
1. Causing nausea; sickening: "the most nauseous offal fit for the gods" (John Fowles).
2. Affected with nausea.

nau′seous·ly adv.
nau′seous·ness n.
Usage Note: Traditional usage lore has insisted that nauseous should be used only to mean "causing nausea" and that it is incorrect to use it to mean "feeling sick to one's stomach." Back in 1965, the Usage Panel was in step with this thinking, with 88 percent rejecting the "feeling sick" meaning of nauseous in the sentence Roller coasters make me nauseous, preferring nauseated instead. Over the years, however, this attitude has shifted dramatically. The proportion of Panelists who disapproved of this same sentence dropped to 72 percent in 1988, 39 percent in 1999, and a slim 23 percent in 2013. This change may have been inevitable once people began to think that nauseous did not properly mean "causing nausea." Even in our 1988 survey, this was the case, as 88 percent preferred nauseating in the sentence The children looked a little green from too many candy apples and nauseating (not nauseous) rides. In 2013, the Panel was presented with this sentence using the word nauseous, and only 30 percent found it acceptable. Since there is abundant evidence for the "feeling sick" use of nauseous, the word presents a classic example of a word whose traditional, "correct" usage has largely been supplanted by a newer, "incorrect" one. In other words, what was once considered an error is now standard practice. Nauseous is now far more common than nauseated in describing the sick feeling.

nauseous

(ˈnɔːzɪəs; -sɪ-)
adj
1. feeling sick
2. (Medicine) causing nausea
3. distasteful to the mind or senses; repulsive
ˈnauseously adv
ˈnauseousness n

nau•seous

(ˈnɔ ʃəs, -zi əs)

adj.
1. affected with nausea; nauseated.
2. causing nausea; sickening; nauseating.
3. disgusting; loathsome.
[1595–1605; < Latin nauseōsus. See nausea, -ous]
nau′seous•ly, adv.
nau′seous•ness, n.
usage: The two literal senses of nauseous, “affected with nausea” (to feel nauseous) and “causing nausea” (a nauseous smell), appear in English at almost the same time in the early 17th century, and both are in standard use at present. nauseous in the sense “affected with nausea” is often criticized, though it is more common than nauseated, the recommended form, in this sense. In the sense “causing nausea,” either literally or figuratively, nauseating has become more common than nauseous: a nauseating smell; nauseating eating habits.

nauseous

, nauseated - Nauseous ("sickening") is an adjective describing something that causes nausea; the adjective for the feeling ("made sick") is nauseated.
See also related terms for sick.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.nauseous - causing or able to cause nauseanauseous - causing or able to cause nausea; "a nauseating smell"; "nauseous offal"; "a sickening stench"
unwholesome - detrimental to physical or moral well-being; "unwholesome food"; "unwholesome habits like smoking"
2.nauseous - feeling nausea; feeling about to vomit
ill, sick - affected by an impairment of normal physical or mental function; "ill from the monotony of his suffering"

nauseous

adjective
1. sick, green, ill, unwell, nauseated, queasy, bilious, crook (Austral. & N.Z. informal) The drugs make me feel nauseous.
2. sickening, offensive, disgusting, revolting, distasteful, repulsive, nauseating, repugnant, loathsome, abhorrent, detestable, yucky or yukky (slang) The floor was deep with bat dung giving off a nauseous smell.
Translations

nauseous

[ˈnɔːsɪəs] ADJ
1. (lit) to feel nauseoussentir náuseas
the sight of food made me (feel) nauseoussólo de ver la comida me daban náuseas
2. [colour, smell] → nauseabundo

nauseous

[ˈnɔːziəs] adj
(= feeling sick) to be nauseous → avoir mal au cœur, avoir envie de vomir
to feel nauseous → avoir mal au cœur, avoir envie de vomir
(= disgusting) → nauséabond(e), écœurant(e)

nauseous

adj
(Med) that made me (feel) nauseousdabei wurde mir übel
(fig)widerlich

nauseous

[ˈnɔːzɪəs] adj (Med) (fig) → nauseabondo/a
to be nauseous → avere la nausea

nau·seous

a. nauseoso-a.
1. propenso a tener náuseas;
2. que produce náusea o asco.

nauseous

adj con náusea(s); (nauseating) asqueroso, nauseabundo, que causa náusea(s)
References in classic literature ?
They spent much of their abundant leisure on the margin of Maule's well, which was haunted by a kind of snail, evidently a titbit to their palates; and the brackish water itself, however nauseous to the rest of the world, was so greatly esteemed by these fowls, that they might be seen tasting, turning up their heads, and smacking their bills, with precisely the air of wine-bibbers round a probationary cask.
Ravenous, and now very faint, I devoured a spoonful or two of my portion without thinking of its taste; but the first edge of hunger blunted, I perceived I had got in hand a nauseous mess; burnt porridge is almost as bad as rotten potatoes; famine itself soon sickens over it.
This man, who might have brought us to the king in three days, led us out of the way through horrid deserts destitute of water, or where what we found was so foul, nauseous, and offensive, that it excited a loathing and aversion which nothing but extreme necessity could have overcome.
You are not descended from a nauseous compound of fanaticism and sensuality, whose only argument was the sword, and whose only paradise was a brothel.
Is it possible, gentle sir, that the nauseous and idle reading of books of chivalry can have had such an effect on your worship as to upset your reason so that you fancy yourself enchanted, and the like, all as far from the truth as falsehood itself is?
Nay, but they are not to take in a decoction or in nauseous form, so you need not snub that so charming nose, or I shall point out to my friend Arthur what woes he may have to endure in seeing so much beauty that he so loves so much distort.
Particularly nauseous were the blank, expressionless faces of people in trains and omnibuses; they seemed no more my fellow-creatures than dead bodies would be, so that I did not dare to travel unless I was assured of being alone.
When the wind of adversity began to blow upon the housekeeping of the Rue des Fossoyeurs--that is to say, when the forty pistoles of King Louis XIII were consumed or nearly so--he commenced complaints which Athos thought nauseous, Porthos indecent, and Aramis ridiculous.
There was a moment's silence, and then was heard the crackling of burning flesh, of which the peculiar and nauseous smell penetrated even behind the wall where Dantes was listening in horror.
I have now given your service three months' trial, and I find it the most nauseous slavery under the sun.
The water tasted like a solution of a dozen disagreeable things, and was sufficiently nauseous to have made the fortune of the proprietor, had the spa been situated in the midst of any civilized community.
It rose and fell again and turned over, showing in fresh form much of the nauseous detail which had been visible earlier.