nautical


Also found in: Thesaurus, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

nau·ti·cal

 (nô′tĭ-kəl)
adj.
Of, relating to, or characteristic of ships, shipping, sailors, or navigation on a body of water.

[From Latin nauticus, from Greek nautikos, from nautēs, sailor, from naus, ship; see nāu- in Indo-European roots.]

nau′ti·cal·ly adv.
Synonyms: nautical, marine, maritime
These adjectives mean of or relating to the sea, ships, shipping, sailors, or navigation: nautical charts; marine insurance; maritime law.

nautical

(ˈnɔːtɪkəl)
adj
of, relating to, or involving ships, navigation, or sailors
[C16: from Latin nauticus, from Greek nautikos, from naus ship]
ˈnautically adv

nau•ti•cal

(ˈnɔ tɪ kəl, ˈnɒt ɪ-)

adj.
of or pertaining to sailors, ships, or navigation.
[1545–55; < Latin nautic(us) (< Greek nautikós= naút(ēs) sailor (naû(s) ship]
nau′ti•cal•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.nautical - relating to or involving ships or shipping or navigation or seamennautical - relating to or involving ships or shipping or navigation or seamen; "nautical charts"; "maritime law"; "marine insurance"

nautical

adjective maritime, boating, sailing, marine, yachting, naval, seafaring, ocean-going, seagoing Jet-skis require no traditional nautical skills.

nautical

adjective
Of or relating to sea navigation:
Translations
بَحْري، مِلاحي
námořnický
nautisksø-
tengerészeti
sjómennsku-
jūreiviškasjūreivystėsjūros
jūras-kuģniecībasnavigācijas-
denizciliğe aitdenizcilikle ilgili

nautical

[ˈnɔːtɪkəl]
A. ADJ [terms, matters, charts] → náutico, marítimo
B. CPD nautical almanac Nalmanaque m náutico
nautical mile Nmilla f marina

nautical

[ˈnɔːtɪkəl] adjnautiquenautical mile nmille m marin

nautical

adjnautisch; prowess, superiorityzur See, seefahrerisch; distancezur See; storiesvon der Seefahrt; language, tradition, appearanceseemännisch; nautical chartSeekarte f; a nautical nationeine Seefahrernation; he is interested in nautical matters, he’s a very nautical personer interessiert sich für die Seefahrt; the music/play has a nautical flavourdie Musik/das Stück beschwört die See herauf

nautical

[ˈnɔːtɪkl] adjnautico/a

nautical

(ˈnoːtikəl) adjective
of ships or sailors. nautical language.
References in classic literature ?
Shops with nautical instruments in the windows, rope and paint sellers, and slop shops with long rows of oilskins dangling from hooks, all proclaimed the neighborhood of the docks.
Redburn: His First Voyage,' published in 1849, is partly founded on the experiences of this trip, which was undertaken with the full consent of his relatives, and which seems to have satisfied his nautical ambition for a time.
On our little walk along the quays, he made himself the most interesting companion, telling me about the different ships that we passed by, their rig, tonnage, and nationality, explaining the work that was going forward--how one was discharging, another taking in cargo, and a third making ready for sea--and every now and then telling me some little anecdote of ships or seamen or repeating a nautical phrase till I had learned it perfectly.
But this extraordinary creature could transport itself from one place to another with surprising velocity; as, in an interval of three days, the Governor Higginson and the Columbus had observed it at two different points of the chart, separated by a distance of more than seven hundred nautical leagues.
You don't mean to say that there is any affinity between nautical matters and ecclesiastical matters?
In front is a leather rack, in which to keep your speaking trumpet, pipe, telescope, and other nautical conveniences.
Thus the Genoese, subtle as he was, was duped by Edmond, in whose favor his mild demeanor, his nautical skill, and his admirable dissimulation, pleaded.
In this way they swept, in full song and with regular flourish of the paddle, round New York, in a still summer evening, to the wonder and admiration of its inhabitants, who had never before witnessed on their waters, a nautical apparition of the kind.
The staffs themselves were like ships' masts, with topmasts spliced on in true nautical fashion, with shrouds, ratlines, gaffs, and flag-halyards.
These white beds are everywhere capped by a mass of gravel, forming probably one of the largest beds of shingle in the world: it certainly extends from near the Rio Colorado to between 600 and 700 nautical miles southward, at Santa Cruz (a river a little south of St.
An' then: 'Our nautical adviser suggests you kept too far south,' an' 'We are lookun' for better results from thot propeller.
Her monstrosities in the way of cattle would have taken prizes at an agricultural fair, and the perilous pitching of her vessels would have produced seasickness in the most nautical observer, if the utter disregard to all known rules of shipbuilding and rigging had not convulsed him with laughter at the first glance.