navalism

navalism

(ˈneɪvəˌlɪzəm)
n
(Military) the promotion of naval interests

navalism

the maintaining of naval interests. — navalist, n.
See also: War
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References in periodicals archive ?
The Naval Policy of Austria-Hungary, 1867-1918: Navalism, Industrial Development, and the Politics of Dualism.
Navalism and the Emergence of American Sea Power, 1882-1893.
Hennessy, "The Rise and Fall of a Canadian Maritime Policy, 1919-1965: A Study of Industry, Navalism and the State" (Ph.
Among the topics are the Anglo-American heritage, the Jeffersonian-Republican surrender, the menace of Civil War, the new threat of imperialism and navalism, conscripting America for war, the militarism of education, immersion in total war, and toward the garrison state.
Koistinen, Arsenal of World War II: The Political Economy of American Warfare, 1940-1945 (Lawrence, KS 2004); Michael Hennessy, "The Rise and Fall of a Canadian Maritime Policy, 1939-1965: A Study of Industry, Navalism and the State," PhD diss.
4) Peter Karsten, The Naval Aristocracy: The Golden Age of Annapolis and the Emergence of Modern American Navalism (New York: The Free Press, 1972), 255.
Buell made the case that hemispheric defense would induce a gigantic navalism, deteriorate American living standards, and lead us into fascism.
Dr Michael Evans, of the Land Warfare Studies Centre, Duntroon, contributes a chapter that gives cogency to two important notions in navalism.
The Naval Policy of Austria-Hungary 1867-1918: Navalism, Industrial Development, and the Politics of Dualism.
Sokol The Imperial and Royal Austro-Hungarian Navy (The Naval Institute Press, 1968); Lawrence Sondhaus, The Naval Policy of Austria-Hungary, 1867-1918: Navalism, Industrial Development and the Politics of Dualism (Purdue University Press, 1994); Lawrence Sondhaus, The Austro-Hungarian Naval Officer Corps 1867-1918' in Austrian History Year-book, (Center for Austrian Studies, University of Minnesota, 1995); Erwin S.
It included politicians such as Theodore Roosevelt and Massachusetts Senator Henry Cabot Lodge as well as intellectuals such as Herbert Croly, Brooks Adams, and Alfred Thayer Mahan, the prophet of American navalism and great-power politics.