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nav·i·ga·tion

 (năv′ĭ-gā′shən)
n.
1. The theory and practice of navigating, especially the charting of a course for a ship or aircraft.
2. Travel or traffic by vessels, especially commercial shipping.

nav′i·ga′tion·al adj.
nav′i·ga′tion·al·ly adv.

navigation

(ˌnævɪˈɡeɪʃən)
n
1. (Navigation) the skill or process of plotting a route and directing a ship, aircraft, etc, along it
2. (Navigation) the act or practice of navigating: dredging made navigation of the river possible.
3. (Nautical Terms) rare US ship traffic; shipping
4. (Physical Geography) dialect Midland English an inland waterway; canal
ˌnaviˈgational adj

nav•i•ga•tion

(ˌnæv ɪˈgeɪ ʃən)

n.
1. the act or process of navigating.
2. the art or science of plotting, ascertaining, or directing the course of a ship, aircraft, spacecraft, etc.
[1520–30; < Latin nāvigātiō a voyage. See navigate, -tion]
nav`i•ga′tion•al, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.navigation - the guidance of ships or airplanes from place to placenavigation - the guidance of ships or airplanes from place to place
steering, guidance, direction - the act of setting and holding a course; "a new council was installed under the direction of the king"
instrument flying - navigation of an airplane solely by instruments
astronavigation, celestial navigation - navigating according to the positions of the stars
dead reckoning - navigation without the aid of celestial observations
bear down on, bear down upon - sail towards another vessel, of a ship
luff, point - sail close to the wind
weather - sail to the windward of
boat - ride in a boat on water
steam, steamer - travel by means of steam power; "The ship steamed off into the Pacific"
yacht - travel in a yacht
sail - travel on water propelled by wind; "I love sailing, especially on the open sea"; "the ship sails on"
beat - sail with much tacking or with difficulty; "The boat beat in the strong wind"
scud, rack - run before a gale
outpoint - sail closer to the wind than
wear round, tack - turn into the wind; "The sailors decided to tack the boat"; "The boat tacked"
wear ship - turn away from the wind; "The sailors decided it was time to wear ship"
ferry - travel by ferry
ferry - transport by ferry
ferry - transport from one place to another
raft - transport on a raft; "raft wood down a river"
barge - transport by barge on a body of water
2.navigation - ship traffic; "the channel will be open to navigation as soon as the ice melts"
shipping, transport, transportation - the commercial enterprise of moving goods and materials
3.navigation - the work of a sailornavigation - the work of a sailor      
leg - (nautical) the distance traveled by a sailing vessel on a single tack
cabotage - navigation in coastal waters
tacking, tack - (nautical) the act of changing tack
employment, work - the occupation for which you are paid; "he is looking for employment"; "a lot of people are out of work"
steerage, steering - the act of steering a ship
accommodation ladder - (nautical) a portable ladder hung over the side of a vessel to give access to small boats alongside
becket - (nautical) a short line with an eye at one end and a knot at the other; used to secure loose items on a ship
bilge well - (nautical) a well where seepage drains to be pumped away
bitter end - (nautical) the inboard end of a line or cable especially the end that is wound around a bitt
chip - a triangular wooden float attached to the end of a log line
deadeye - (nautical) a round hardwood disk with holes and a grooved perimeter used to tighten a shroud
escutcheon - (nautical) a plate on a ship's stern on which the name is inscribed
jack ladder, pilot ladder, Jacob's ladder - (nautical) a hanging ladder of ropes or chains supporting wooden or metal rungs or steps
laniard, lanyard - (nautical) a line used for extending or fastening rigging on ships
lead line, sounding line - (nautical) plumb line for determining depth
luff - (nautical) the forward edge of a fore-and-aft sail that is next to the mast
overhead - (nautical) the top surface of an enclosed space on a ship
ratlin, ratline - (nautical) a small horizontal rope between the shrouds of a sailing ship; they form a ladder for climbing aloft
rudder - (nautical) steering mechanism consisting of a hinged vertical plate mounted at the stern of a vessel
sea ladder, sea steps - (nautical) ladder to be lowered over a ship's side for coming aboard
mainsheet, weather sheet, shroud, tack, sheet - (nautical) a line (rope or chain) that regulates the angle at which a sail is set in relation to the wind
spun yarn - (nautical) small stuff consisting of a lightweight rope made of several rope yarns loosely wound together
stay - (nautical) brace consisting of a heavy rope or wire cable used as a support for a mast or spar
sternpost - (nautical) the principal upright timber at the stern of a vessel
fireroom, stokehold, stokehole - (nautical) chamber or compartment in which the furnaces of a ship are stoked or fired
towing line, towing rope, towline, towrope - (nautical) a rope used in towing
capsizing - (nautical) the event of a boat accidentally turning over in the water
beam-ends - (nautical) at the ends of the transverse deck beams of a vessel; "on her beam-ends" means heeled over on the side so that the deck is almost vertical
ship's bell, bell - (nautical) each of the eight half-hour units of nautical time signaled by strokes of a ship's bell; eight bells signals 4:00, 8:00, or 12:00 o'clock, either a.m. or p.m.
steerageway - (nautical) the minimum rate of motion needed for a vessel to be maneuvered
stand out - steer away from shore, of ships
starboard - turn to the right, of helms or rudders
fore - situated at or toward the bow of a vessel
rigged - fitted or equipped with necessary rigging (sails and shrouds and stays etc)
unrigged - stripped of rigging
close to the wind - nearly opposite to the direction from which wind is coming; "sailing close to the wind"

navigation

noun sailing, cruising, steering, manoeuvring, voyaging, seamanship, helmsmanship Pack ice was becoming a threat to navigation.
Translations
مِلاحَه
navigacenavigační umění
navigation
siglingafræîi
navigácia
navigacija
seyretmeseyrüsefer

navigation

[ˌnævɪˈgeɪʃən]
A. N
1. (= act) [of ship, plane] → navegación f
to do the navigation (Aut) → hacer de copiloto
2. (= science) → náutica f, navegación f
B. CPD navigation lights NPL (on ship) → luces fpl de navegación; (in harbour) → baliza f

navigation

[ˌnævɪˈgeɪʃən] nnavigation f

navigation

n
(= act of navigating)Navigation f
(= shipping)Schiffsverkehr m
(= skill: in ship, plane) → Navigation f; how’s your navigation? (in car) → bist du als Beifahrer gut zu gebrauchen?; his navigation was lousy, we got lost (in car) → er hat mich so schlecht dirigiert, dass wir uns verirrt haben

navigation

:
navigation channel
n (Naut) → Fahrwasser nt
navigation law
nSchifffahrtsregelung f
navigation light
nPositionslicht ntor -lampe f
navigation system
n (Tech, Aut) → Navigationssystem nt

navigation

[ˌnævɪˈgeɪʃn] nnavigazione f

navigate

(ˈnӕvigeit) verb
1. to direct, guide or move (a ship, aircraft etc) in a particular direction. He navigated the ship through the dangerous rocks.
2. to find or follow one's route when in a ship, aircraft, car etc. If I drive will you navigate?
ˈnavigable adjective
(negative unnavigable) able to be travelled along. a navigable river.
ˌnaviˈgation noun
the art or skill of navigating.
ˈnavigator noun
a person who navigates.
References in classic literature ?
Notwithstanding the Hurons were necessarily ignorant of the little channels among the eddies and rapids of the stream, they knew the common signs of such a navigation too well to commit any material blunder.
In those days, the captain's authority was restricted to the navigation and general management of the vessel: while over the whale-hunting department and all its concerns, the Specksynder or Chief Harpooneer reigned supreme.
If I could have been inspired with a knowledge of the science of navigation, taken the command of a fast-sailing expedition, and gone round the world on a triumphant voyage of discovery, I think I might have considered myself completely suited.
Early as it was, there were plenty of scullers going here and there that morning, and plenty of barges dropping down with the tide; the navigation of the river between bridges, in an open boat, was a much easier and commoner matter in those days than it is in these; and we went ahead among many skiffs and wherries, briskly.
Early in December came a black frost, and navigation on the canal was suspended.
All told, we had scarce two miles to run; but the navigation was delicate, the entrance to this northern anchorage was not only narrow and shoal, but lay east and west, so that the schooner must be nicely handled to be got in.
My father now and then sending me small sums of money, I laid them out in learning navigation, and other parts of the mathematics, useful to those who intend to travel, as I always believed it would be, some time or other, my fortune to do.
Once on board, I soon saw that the captain was too much occupied with the difficulties of navigation to pay much heed to me, though he generously made me welcome, and would not even accept the jewels with which I offered to pay my passage.
But this discovery was reserved for the invincible bravery of our noble countrymen, who, not discouraged by the dangers of a navigation in seas never explored before, have subdued kingdoms and empires where the Greek and Roman greatness, where the names of Caesar and Alexander, were never heard of; who have demolished the airy fabrics of renowned hypotheses, and detected those fables which the ancients rather chose to invent of the sources of the Nile than to confess their ignorance.
It was to renew that connection with their country which had been severed by their compulsory expatriation, that they resolved to face all the hazards of a perilous navigation and all the labors of a toilsome distant settlement.
The wars of these two last-mentioned nations have in a great measure grown out of commercial considerations, -- the desire of supplanting and the fear of being supplanted, either in particular branches of traffic or in the general advantages of trade and navigation, and sometimes even the more culpable desire of sharing in the commerce of other nations without their consent.
With them and with most other European nations we are rivals in navigation and the carrying trade; and we shall deceive ourselves if we suppose that any of them will rejoice to see it flourish; for, as our carrying trade cannot increase without in some degree diminishing theirs, it is more their interest, and will be more their policy, to restrain than to promote it.