navigator


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Related to navigator: Netscape Navigator

nav·i·ga·tor

 (năv′ĭ-gā′tər)
n.
1. One who navigates.
2. A device that directs the course of an aircraft or missile.

navigator

(ˈnævɪˌɡeɪtə)
n
1. (Navigation) a person who is skilled in or performs navigation, esp on a ship or aircraft
2. (Historical Terms) (esp formerly) a person who explores by ship
3. (Aeronautics) an instrument or device for assisting a pilot to navigate an aircraft

nav•i•ga•tor

(ˈnæv ɪˌgeɪ tər)

n.
1. a person who practices, or is skilled in, navigation.
2. a person who conducts explorations by sea.
[1580–90; < Latin nāvigātor sailor. See navigate]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.navigator - the ship's officer in charge of navigationnavigator - the ship's officer in charge of navigation
ship's officer, officer - a person authorized to serve in a position of authority on a vessel; "he is the officer in charge of the ship's engines"
2.navigator - the member of an aircrew who is responsible for the aircraft's course
aircrewman - a member of an aircrew
astrogator - the navigator of a spacecraft
3.navigator - in earlier times, a person who explored by ship
explorer, adventurer - someone who travels into little known regions (especially for some scientific purpose)
Juan Ponce de Leon, Ponce de Leon - Spanish explorer who accompanied Columbus on his second trip in 1493; in 1513 he discovered Florida while searching for the legendary Fountain of Youth (1460-1521)

navigator

noun helmsman, guide, pilot, seaman, mariner, steersman Which of you is the best navigator?

navigator

noun
A person engaged in sailing or working on a ship:
Informal: salt, tar.
Slang: gob.
Translations
مَلاّح، بَحّار
navigátor
navigatør
hajósnavigátor
siglingafræîingur
navigátor
navigator
rota görevlisiseyrüseferci

navigator

[ˈnævɪgeɪtəʳ] N
1. (Naut) (= officer on ship) → oficial mf de derrota, oficial mf de navegación (Aer) → navegante mf (Aut) → copiloto mf
2. (Hist) (= seafarer) → navegador m, navegante m

navigator

[ˈnævɪgeɪtər] nnavigateur/trice m/f

navigator

n (Naut) → Navigationsoffizier(in) m(f); (Aviat) → Navigator(in) m(f); (Mot) → Beifahrer(in) m(f)

navigator

[ˈnævɪˌgeɪtəʳ] n (Naut, Aer) → navigatore m, ufficiale m di rotta; (explorer) → navigatore m (Aut) → secondo pilota m, copilota m/f

navigate

(ˈnӕvigeit) verb
1. to direct, guide or move (a ship, aircraft etc) in a particular direction. He navigated the ship through the dangerous rocks.
2. to find or follow one's route when in a ship, aircraft, car etc. If I drive will you navigate?
ˈnavigable adjective
(negative unnavigable) able to be travelled along. a navigable river.
ˌnaviˈgation noun
the art or skill of navigating.
ˈnavigator noun
a person who navigates.
References in classic literature ?
That's my small experience, so far as the Massachusetts calendar, and Bowditch's navigator, and Daboll's arithmetic go.
She ascertained from me in a few words what it was all about, comforted Dora, and gradually convinced her that I was not a labourer - from my manner of stating the case I believe Dora concluded that I was a navigator, and went balancing myself up and down a plank all day with a wheelbarrow - and so brought us together in peace.
Then, chart in hand, we reviewed the travels of the French navigator, his voyages of circumnavigation, his double detention at the South Pole, which led to the discovery of Adelaide and Louis Philippe, and fixing the hydrographical bearings of the principal islands of Oceania.
I am comfortably off, monsieur, that's all; I have scraped together some such thing as an income of two or three thousand crown in the haberdashery business, but more particularly in venturing some funds in the last voyage of the celebrated navigator Jean Moquet; so that you understand, monsieur--But" cried the citizen.
A part of the good abbe's words, however, were wholly incomprehensible to him; but, like the aurora which guides the navigator in northern latitudes, opened new vistas to the inquiring mind of the listener, and gave fantastic glimpses of new horizons, enabling him justly to estimate the delight an intellectual mind would have in following one so richly gifted as Faria along the heights of truth, where he was so much at home.
In honour of the Marquess de Mendoza, then viceroy of Peru--under whose auspices the navigator sailed--he bestowed upon them the name which denoted the rank of his patron, and gave to the world on his return a vague and magnificent account of their beauty.
He got together, therefore, his army, formidable at the same time for its composition and its numbers, and hastened to meet Monk, who, on his part, like a prudent navigator sailing amidst rocks, advanced by very short marches, listening to the reports and scenting the air which came from London.
Like a sneak-thief, too, emerges a shock-headed navigator in his shirt-sleeves.
The building had to be long, because the grave of the honored old navigator is two hundred and ten feet long itself
Caprona has always been considered a more or less mythical land, though it is vouched for by an eminent navigator of the eighteenth century; but Bowen's narrative made it seem very real, however many miles of trackless ocean lay between us and it.
He had a master's certificate, and was on the ship's papers as captain, but I was a better navigator than he, and I was really captain myself.
Nor did he know it was the head of La Perouse, the doughty old navigator, who had left his bones, the bones of his crews, and the bones of his two frigates, the Astrolabe and the Boussole, on the shores of the cannibal Solomons.