nebbish


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neb·bish

 (nĕb′ĭsh)
n.
A person regarded as weak-willed or timid.

[Yiddish nebekh, poor, unfortunate, of Slavic origin; see bhag- in Indo-European roots.]

neb′bish·y adj.

nebbish

(ˈnɛbɪʃ)
adj
(of a man) timid and submissive
n
a man who is timid and submissive

neb•bish

(ˈnɛb ɪʃ)

n. Slang.
a pitifully ineffectual, inept, and timid person.
[1890–95; < Yiddish nebekh poor, unfortunate, probably < Slavic; compare Czech nebohý poor]
neb′bish•y, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.nebbish - (Yiddish) a timid unfortunate simpleton
Yiddish - a dialect of High German including some Hebrew and other words; spoken in Europe as a vernacular by many Jews; written in the Hebrew script
simpleton, simple - a person lacking intelligence or common sense

nebbish

noun
A totally insignificant person:
Informal: pip-squeak, zero.
Slang: shrimp, zilch.
Translations
Nebbich

nebbish

n (sl)Schlappschwanz m (inf)
References in periodicals archive ?
2) It was this historical figure who provided the basis for the film's nebbish Dr Schreber.
His big break was for originating the role of the weirdly nebbish Elder Cunningham in The Book of Mormon (seriously, why do so many Jews play the geeky Mormon character in that show?
British baritone Jonathan McGovern's Pelleas enters as the nebbish younger brother to Golaud--there is no mistaking his low status in the pecking order of this household.
She bursts through his gray life in rainbow montages, reminding the nebbish and audience alike of simpler times (milk shakes, the world's largest pencil, Sharpie tattoos, not suffrage, Jim Crow, or the real estate bubble).
The warm performances of a terrific cast soften the underlying sadness of Finn's breakthrough musical about a nebbish named Marvin (an endearing performance from Christian Borle) who leaves his loving wife, Trina (Stephanie J.
Sam Lupton plays Seymour as sweet but slightly nebbish, while Stephanie Clift's human Audrey has a fragile goofy charm.
The characters display varying degrees of four historically represented Jewish American stereotypes: "the meddling matriarch," "the neurotic nebbish," "the pampered princess," and "the scheming scumbag.
These include both direct and indirect statements of Jewish identity; the insertion of Hebrew and Yiddish loan words and syntactical features into otherwise standard American speech; the invocation of cultural and ritual signifiers; and the construction of a shlemiel or nebbish character as speaker and protagonist.
Period detail is impeccable, and Jesse Eisenberg is a neat fit for the filmmaker's nebbish on-screen alter ego: a dutiful Jewish son in search of independence and self-worth far from his clucky mother's bosom.
Period detail is impeccable, and Jesse Eisenberg is a neat fit for the film-maker's nebbish on-screen alter-ego: a dutiful Jewish son in search of independence and self-worth far from his clucky mother's bosom.
In The Joys of Yiddish, Leo Rosten explains that a nebbish is "an innocuous, ineffectual, weak, helpless or hapless unfortunate.
He comes across as a sort of nebbish, a loner, who shows almost no interaction with people.