nebbishy


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Related to nebbishy: shlemiel, shmegegge

neb·bish

 (nĕb′ĭsh)
n.
A person regarded as weak-willed or timid.

[Yiddish nebekh, poor, unfortunate, of Slavic origin; see bhag- in Indo-European roots.]

neb′bish·y adj.

nebbishy

(ˈnɛbɪʃɪ)
adj
dialect somewhat fearful or timid
References in periodicals archive ?
You seem pretty mature for a skin-head" observes one of Daniel Radcliffe's white supremacist leaders in "Imperium," in which the former Boy Who Lived plays a nebbishy, classical-music-loving FBI agent under deep cover in the neo-Nazi underworld.
The group of nefarious, nebbishy intellectuals are a classic Coen bunch of deadpan delights.
There's the nebbishy, studious Bernard in Salesman, but he's just a minor foil for the enormous pathos of Willy Loman and his son Biff.
McClure is a treat as clueless, nebbishy Jack, creating an appealing chemistry with O'Malley's lovely, clear-eyed Betsy.
What was taken as a very positive way of being in the world gets transmuted into a nebbishy, inef-fective--particularly sexually ineffective--character of someone like Woody Allen.
All hail nebbishy genius Dustin Hoffman," the New York Mirror's Michael Musto effused about the actor's remarkably diverse, Jewish-tinged portfolio in 2005.
Nate Silver, the nebbishy statistical genius who conquered poker, baseball and then politics, was the man of the hour on Tuesday.
A rather light-hearted romp between Allen as Danny, a nebbishy, nerdy loser of an agent and Mia Farrow as Tina, a bleached-blonde Italian woman with a New Jersey accent that grates and a philosophy to match.
From Woody Allen, in his 1977 magic-realist short story "The Kugelmass Episode" (about a nebbishy young man who encounters Emma outside of Flaubert's book, in a rented suite in Manhattan's Plaza Hotel, and soon tires of her complaints), to Mario Vargas Llosa, the Nobel Prize-winning Peruvian novelist, whose study of Flaubert's heroine, The Perpetual Orgy, is a gallant love letter, "La Bovary, c'est nous.
Nebbishy accountant Leo Bloom (Wilder) arrives at Bialystock's office to do his books and discovers a $2000 error in the accounts of Bialystock's last play.
NBC's "30 Rock" led all series with 17 nominations, including seven in the guest-actor categories, which apparently means no other show on TV can cast guest stars capably, or that "30 Rock's" stunt casting just works particularly well (and my favorite "30 Rock" guest -- Matthew Broderick as the nebbishy Washington crony -- didn't even get nominated).