necrolysis


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Noun1.necrolysis - disintegration and dissolution of dead tissue
lysis - (biochemistry) dissolution or destruction of cells such as blood cells or bacteria
Translations
nécrolyse

ne·crol·y·sis

n. necrolisis, necrosis o disolución de tejido.

necrolysis

n necrólisis f; toxic epidermal — necrólisis epidérmica tóxica
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References in periodicals archive ?
To determine the causes and treatment outcome of Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN).
CHICAGO -- Pediatric patients with Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis who received purely supportive care and surgical debridement had poorer outcomes, compared with other treatment modalities, a systematic review suggested.
Background: Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) are life-threatening diseases with high mortality rates.
Objective: To identify the main factors causing Steven Johnson syndrome (SJS) and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) and their clinical outcome in the patients in our local setup.
11] Two cases of toxic epidermal necrolysis also had associated fever.
This includes cases of Stevens-Johnson syndrome, hypersensitivity reaction, and toxic epidermal necrolysis.
In the realm of more specialized aspects of pediatric dermatology, we have some excellent tips on minimizing pain and anxiety during pediatric dermatology procedures in young children, as well as an article on Steven-Johnson Syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis, conditions we have to keep an eye out for given the incredible morbidity and rare but distressing mortality they are associated with.
CM is a widely prescribed muscle relaxant which has been reported to cause Stevens–Johnson syndrome, toxic epidermal necrolysis, and fulminant hepatitis.
It's important to differentiate EM from life-threatening conditions like SJS and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN).
By consensus definition in 1993, Stevensp--Johnson syndrome was classified separately from the erythema multiforme spectrum and listed under toxic epidermal necrolysis (3).
Aim: Stevens Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis are severe acute mucocutaneous diseases.