necromancy


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nec·ro·man·cy

 (nĕk′rə-măn′sē)
n.
1. The practice of supposedly communicating with the spirits of the dead in order to predict the future.
2. Black magic; sorcery.
3. Magic qualities.

[Alteration of Middle English nigromancie, from Old French nigremancie, from Medieval Latin nigromantia, alteration (influenced by Latin niger, black) of Late Latin necromantīa, from Greek nekromanteia : nekros, corpse; see nek- in Indo-European roots + -manteia, -mancy.]

nec′ro·man′cer n.
nec′ro·man′tic (-măn′tĭk) adj.

necromancy

(ˈnɛkrəʊˌmænsɪ)
n
1. (Alternative Belief Systems) the art or practice of supposedly conjuring up the dead, esp in order to obtain from them knowledge of the future
2. black magic; sorcery
[C13: (as in sense 1) ultimately from Greek nekromanteia, from nekros corpse; (as in sense 2) from Medieval Latin nigromantia, from Latin niger black, which replaced necro- through folk etymology]
ˈnecroˌmancer n
ˌnecroˈmantic adj

nec•ro•man•cy

(ˈnɛk rəˌmæn si)

n.
1. a method of divination through invocation of the dead.
2. magic in general, esp. that practiced by a witch or sorcerer; conjuration.
[1300–50; Middle English nigromancie < Medieval Latin nigromantīa, for Late Latin necromantīa < Greek nekromanteía; see necro-, -mancy]
nec′ro•man`cer, n.
nec`ro•man′tic, adj.

necromancy

1. the magie practiced by a witch or sorcerer.
2. a form of divination through communication with the dead; the black art. Also nigromancy. — necromancer, necromant, nigromancien, n.necromantie, adj.
See also: Death
1. the magic practiced by a witch or sorcerer.
2. a form of divination through communication with the dead. Also called nigromancy. — necromancer, necromant, nigromancien, n. — necromantie, adj.
See also: Divination

necromancy

1. Asking the dead to answer questions about the future using automatic writing, a ouija board, or through a medium.
2. The summoning of the dead for the purposes of divination.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.necromancy - the belief in magical spells that harness occult forces or evil spirits to produce unnatural effects in the worldnecromancy - the belief in magical spells that harness occult forces or evil spirits to produce unnatural effects in the world
magic, thaumaturgy - any art that invokes supernatural powers
witchcraft, witchery - the art of sorcery
bewitchment, enchantment - a magical spell
demonism, diabolism, Satanism - a belief in and reverence for devils (especially Satan)
obiism - belief in a kind of sorcery that originated in Africa and is practiced in the West Indies
2.necromancy - conjuring up the dead, especially for prophesying
fortune telling, soothsaying, foretelling, divination - the art or gift of prophecy (or the pretense of prophecy) by supernatural means

necromancy

noun magic, witchcraft, voodoo, the occult (rare), wizardry, black magic, enchantment, divination, occultism, sorcery, black art, demonology, witchery, voodooism They were accused of using necromancy and the black arts.
Translations
nekromantia
necromantianigromantia

necromancy

[ˈnekrəʊmænsɪ] Nnigromancia f, nigromancía f

necromancy

[ˈnɛkrəmænsi] nnécromancie f

necromancy

nToten- or Geisterbeschwörung f, → Nekromantie f

necromancy

[ˈnɛkrəʊˌmænsɪ] n (frm) → negromanzia
References in classic literature ?
As this ancient lady had the renown (which subsequently cost her no less a price than her life) of being a principal actor in all the works of necromancy that were continually going forward, the crowd gave way before her, and seemed to fear the touch of her garment, as if it carried the plague among its gorgeous folds.
There is a dread, unhallowed necromancy of evil, that turns things sweetest and holiest to phantoms of horror and affright.
But do thou, brother, return to me as if it were to the house of thy father, and bring me word how it has sped with thee; and well do I hope thou wilt bring with thee Rebecca, even the scholar of the wise Miriam, whose cures the Gentiles slandered as if they had been wrought by necromancy.
By his skill in necromancy he has a power of calling whom he pleases from the dead, and commanding their service for twenty-four hours, but no longer; nor can he call the same persons up again in less than three months, except upon very extraordinary occasions.
This vampire which is amongst us is of himself so strong in person as twenty men, he is of cunning more than mortal, for his cunning be the growth of ages, he have still the aids of necromancy, which is, as his etymology imply, the divination by the dead, and all the dead that he can come nigh to are for him at command, he is brute, and more than brute, he is devil in callous, and the heart of him is not, he can, within his range, direct the elements, the storm, the fog, the thunder, he can command all the meaner things, the rat, and the owl, and the bat, the moth, and the fox, and the wolf, he can grow and become small, and he can at times vanish and come unknown.
We ought to mention however, that the sciences of Egypt, that necromancy and magic, even the whitest, even the most innocent, had no more envenomed enemy, no more pitiless denunciator before the gentlemen of the officialty of Notre-Dame.
And yet--and here enters the necromancy of John Barleycorn--that afternoon's drunk on the Idler had been a purple passage flung into the monotony of my days.
I had an unpleasant mental vision of the dark road, of the sombre grounds, and the desolately suspicious aspect of that home of necromancy and intrigue and feminist adoration.
Thick coats of paint had been laid on the naked poll, and certain fanciful designs, in the same material, had even been extended into the neighbourhood of the eyes and mouth, lending to the keen expression of the former a look of twinkling cunning, and to the dogmatism of the latter, not a little of the grimness of necromancy.
Necromancie," being singular, might in theory represent a more general state of being, rather than specific actions; but necromancy meant conjuration with the aid of evil spirits, which had to include specific actions.
More specifically, it was laid down that on February 6 1475 Stacy and Blake had 'worked and calculated by art magic, necromancy and astronomy' the death of the King, and that in March 1477 Burdet had disseminated 'bills and writings, rhymes and ballads' to incite Edward's subjects to rebellion.
After an extended introduction about both medieval necromancy and the manuscript itself he presents various experiments, with extended translations, according to themes he has discerned within the manuscript: illusionist (making things appear differently from what they are), psychological (the exercise of power over another individual), and divinatory (seeing the past, the future, and hidden objects).