necrotizing fasciitis


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Related to necrotizing fasciitis: necrotizing enterocolitis

necrotizing fasciitis

n.
Severe, rapidly progressing infection of subcutaneous tissues by streptococci and other bacteria, marked by tissue necrosis and by pain, swelling, and heat in the affected area, usually following an injury or a surgical procedure.
References in periodicals archive ?
You're many, many thousands of times more likely to get the flu this year than necrotizing fasciitis once in your lifetime.
The laboratory risk indicator for necrotizing fasciitis (LRINEC) score was measured by performing CRP (C-reactive protein) levels, total white cell count, haemoglobin level, serum sodium, serum creatinine and blood glucose levels.
Predictors of mortality in patients with Necrotizing Fasciitis.
Abbreviations NSTI - necrotizing soft tissue infection SIRS - systemic inflammatory response syndrome HBOT - hyperbaric oxygen therapy LRINEC - Laboratory Risk Indicator for Necrotizing Fasciitis HBG - hemoglobin CRP - C-reactiv protein WBC - white blood cells RBC - red blood cells
To put it in a "good news, bad news" perspective: Necrotizing fasciitis is statistically rare and not contagious; however, if it's not identified, and treatment hasn't begun, within a few days, it can be fatal in up to 25 percent of cases.
Here, we report a case of necrotizing fasciitis resulting from Streptococcus pneumoniae evidenced by clinical presentation and pathological findings.
Five cases of necrotizing fasciitis and one case each of eosinophilic cellulitis, labial abscess, staphylococcal toxic shock syndrome, and osteomyelitis have been reported in the literature.
Surviving the Flesh-Eating Bacteria" underscores the devastating impact of necrotizing fasciitis and the human tragedies and triumphs that result.
NeutroPhase was pioneered for the treatment of necrotizing fasciitis.
Septic shock and necrotizing fasciitis due to invasive Pasteurellosis are rarely seen.
Necrotizing fasciitis described in 1871 by Joseph Jones.

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