nectar


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nec·tar

 (nĕk′tər)
n.
1. A sweet liquid that many plants secrete from specialized structures, often inside flowers, where it serves to attract pollinators such as certain insects and birds. Bees use nectar to make honey.
2. Greek & Roman Mythology The drink of the gods.
3.
a. A beverage containing fruit juice or purée.
b. A delicious or invigorating drink.

[Latin, from Greek nektar, drink of the gods; see nek- in Indo-European roots.]

nec′tar·ous adj.

nectar

(ˈnɛktə)
n
1. (Botany) a sugary fluid produced in the nectaries of plants and collected by bees and other animals
2. (Classical Myth & Legend) classical myth the drink of the gods. Compare ambrosia1
3. any delicious drink, esp a sweet one
4. something very pleasant or welcome: your words are nectar to me.
5. (Cookery) chiefly
a. the undiluted juice of a fruit
b. a mixture of fruit juices
[C16: via Latin from Greek néktar, perhaps nek- death (related to nekros corpse) + -tar, related to Sanskrit tarati he overcomes; compare Latin nex death and trans across]
nectareous, ˈnectarous adj

nec•tar

(ˈnɛk tər)

n.
1. the saccharine secretion of a plant, which attracts the insects or birds that pollinate the flower.
2. the juice of a fruit, esp. when not diluted, or a blend of fruit juices.
3. (in Greek myth) the life-giving drink of the gods.
4. any delicious drink.
[1545–55; < Latin < Greek néktar]
nec′tar•like`, adj.

nec·tar

(nĕk′tər)
A sweet liquid secreted by certain flowers that is consumed by pollinating insects and birds and is gathered by bees to make honey.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.nectar - a sweet liquid secretion that is attractive to pollinatorsnectar - a sweet liquid secretion that is attractive to pollinators
secretion - a functionally specialized substance (especially one that is not a waste) released from a gland or cell
2.nectar - fruit juice especially when undiluted
fruit crush, fruit juice - drink produced by squeezing or crushing fruit
3.nectar - (classical mythology) the food and drink of the godsnectar - (classical mythology) the food and drink of the gods; mortals who ate it became immortal
dainty, goody, kickshaw, treat, delicacy - something considered choice to eat
classical mythology - the system of mythology of the Greeks and Romans together; much of Roman mythology (especially the gods) was borrowed from the Greeks
Translations
رَحيقمَشْروب حُلو، شَراب الآلِهَه
nektar
nektarsaftevandgudedrik
linnunmaitomehumesinektari
nektárvirágmézistenek itala
gómsætur drykkurhunangslögur
nektaras
nektārs
nektár
bal özülezzetli içkinektar

nectar

[ˈnektəʳ] Nnéctar m

nectar

[ˈnɛktər] nnectar m

nectar

n (lit, fig)Nektar m

nectar

[ˈnɛktəʳ] nnettare m

nectar

(ˈnektə) noun
1. the sweet liquid collected by bees to make honey.
2. a delicious drink.
References in classic literature ?
Let us now suppose a little sweet juice or nectar to be excreted by the inner bases of the petals of a flower.
Since I cannot sleep," she said, "on account of your song which, believe me, is sweet as the lyre of Apollo, I shall indulge myself in drinking some nectar which Pallas lately gave me.
As Spring, Mother of many-coloured birth, doth rear The young light-hearted world, so Autumn drains The nectar of the world's maturity.
Each guest had been served with a crystal goblet filled with lacasa, which is a sort of nectar famous in Oz and nicer to drink than soda-water or lemonade.
There is the "Sea of Serenity," over which the young girl bends; "The Lake of Dreams," reflecting a joyous future; "The Sea of Nectar," with its waves of tenderness and breezes of love; "The Sea of Fruitfulness;" "The Sea of Crises;" then the "Sea of Vapors," whose dimensions are perhaps a little too confined; and lastly, that vast "Sea of Tranquillity," in which every false passion, every useless dream, every unsatisfied desire is at length absorbed, and whose waves emerge peacefully into the "Lake of Death
But when he had provided those three with all things fitting, nectar and ambrosia which the gods themselves eat, and when their proud spirit revived within them all after they had fed on nectar and delicious ambrosia, then it was that the father of men and gods spoke amongst them:
News is often dispersed as thoughtlessly and effectively as that pollen which the bees carry off (having no idea how powdery they are) when they are buzzing in search of their particular nectar.
But above all, and to give a bacchanalian grace to this truly masculine repast, the captain produced his mellifluous keg of home-brewed nectar, which had been so potent over the senses of the veteran of Hudson's Bay.
Everything that sleep gives birth to that is lovely, its fairy scenes, its flowers and nectar, the wild voluptuousness or profound repose of the senses, had the painter elaborated on his frescoes.
His Majesty seemed thoughtful, and while the servants passed around glasses of nectar and plates of frosted cakes their King was silent and a bit nervous.
As she spoke she drew a table loaded with ambrosia beside him and mixed him some red nectar, so Mercury ate and drank till he had had enough, and then said:
As he spoke, he took a double cup of nectar, and placed it in his mother's hand.