nectar


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nec·tar

 (nĕk′tər)
n.
1. A sweet liquid that many plants secrete from specialized structures, often inside flowers, where it serves to attract pollinators such as certain insects and birds. Bees use nectar to make honey.
2. Greek & Roman Mythology The drink of the gods.
3.
a. A beverage containing fruit juice or purée.
b. A delicious or invigorating drink.

[Latin, from Greek nektar, drink of the gods; see nek- in Indo-European roots.]

nec′tar·ous adj.

nectar

(ˈnɛktə)
n
1. (Botany) a sugary fluid produced in the nectaries of plants and collected by bees and other animals
2. (Classical Myth & Legend) classical myth the drink of the gods. Compare ambrosia1
3. any delicious drink, esp a sweet one
4. something very pleasant or welcome: your words are nectar to me.
5. (Cookery) chiefly
a. the undiluted juice of a fruit
b. a mixture of fruit juices
[C16: via Latin from Greek néktar, perhaps nek- death (related to nekros corpse) + -tar, related to Sanskrit tarati he overcomes; compare Latin nex death and trans across]
nectareous, ˈnectarous adj

nec•tar

(ˈnɛk tər)

n.
1. the saccharine secretion of a plant, which attracts the insects or birds that pollinate the flower.
2. the juice of a fruit, esp. when not diluted, or a blend of fruit juices.
3. (in Greek myth) the life-giving drink of the gods.
4. any delicious drink.
[1545–55; < Latin < Greek néktar]
nec′tar•like`, adj.

nec·tar

(nĕk′tər)
A sweet liquid secreted by certain flowers that is consumed by pollinating insects and birds and is gathered by bees to make honey.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.nectar - a sweet liquid secretion that is attractive to pollinatorsnectar - a sweet liquid secretion that is attractive to pollinators
secretion - a functionally specialized substance (especially one that is not a waste) released from a gland or cell
2.nectar - fruit juice especially when undiluted
fruit crush, fruit juice - drink produced by squeezing or crushing fruit
3.nectar - (classical mythology) the food and drink of the godsnectar - (classical mythology) the food and drink of the gods; mortals who ate it became immortal
dainty, goody, kickshaw, treat, delicacy - something considered choice to eat
classical mythology - the system of mythology of the Greeks and Romans together; much of Roman mythology (especially the gods) was borrowed from the Greeks
Translations
رَحيقمَشْروب حُلو، شَراب الآلِهَه
nektar
nektarsaftevandgudedrik
linnunmaitomehumesinektari
nektárvirágmézistenek itala
gómsætur drykkurhunangslögur
nektaras
nektārs
nektár
bal özülezzetli içkinektar

nectar

[ˈnektəʳ] Nnéctar m

nectar

[ˈnɛktər] nnectar m

nectar

n (lit, fig)Nektar m

nectar

[ˈnɛktəʳ] nnettare m

nectar

(ˈnektə) noun
1. the sweet liquid collected by bees to make honey.
2. a delicious drink.
References in classic literature ?
Laurence and Aunt March shrugged and smiled at one another when water, lemonade, and coffee were found to be to only sorts of nectar which the three Hebes carried around.
She was doing tasks in which she could not be fully happy,--heavy and trying tasks, which perhaps she could never do with complete success or satisfaction; and like promise of nectar to thirsty lips was the vision of joys she had had to put aside for the performance of dull daily duty.
We feasted that evening as on nectar and ambrosia; and not the least delight of the entertainment was the smile of gratification with which our hostess regarded us, as we satisfied our famished appetites on the delicate fare she liberally supplied.
said Gurth, setting down the cup, ``what nectar these unbelieving dogs drink, while true Christians are fain to quaff ale as muddy and thick as the draff we give to hogs
As Spring, Mother of many-coloured birth, doth rear The young light-hearted world, so Autumn drains The nectar of the world's maturity.
As she spoke she drew a table loaded with ambrosia beside him and mixed him some red nectar, so Mercury ate and drank till he had had enough, and then said:
But above all, and to give a bacchanalian grace to this truly masculine repast, the captain produced his mellifluous keg of home-brewed nectar, which had been so potent over the senses of the veteran of Hudson's Bay.
I had, however, no fancy for his acid German nectar, but I liked coffee, so I responded--
As he spoke, he took a double cup of nectar, and placed it in his mother's hand.
This certainly would be the case, were it not that the young fruit, encased in a soft green husk, with the incipient meat adhering in a jelly-like pellicle to its sides, and containing a bumper of the most delicious nectar, is what they chiefly prize.
In what apartment is he to be placed, sir; and at what table is he to receive his nectar and ambrosia?
Diana and Venus, no doubt, abused the beautiful Alcmena and poor Io, when they condescended, for distraction's sake, to speak, amidst nectar and ambrosia, of mortal beauties, at the table of Jupiter.