needlewoman

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nee·dle·wom·an

 (nēd′l-wo͝om′ən)
n.
A woman who does needlework, especially a seamstress.

needlewoman

(ˈniːdəlˌwʊmən)
n, pl -women
(Knitting & Sewing) a woman who does needlework; seamstress

nee•dle•wom•an

(ˈnid lˌwʊm ən)

n., pl. -wom•en.
a woman who does embroidery, needlepoint, sewing, etc., esp. expertly or professionally.
[1605–15]
usage: See -woman.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.needlewoman - someone who makes or mends dressesneedlewoman - someone who makes or mends dresses  
garment worker, garmentmaker, garment-worker - a person who makes garments
Translations

needlewoman

[ˈniːdlˌwʊmən] N (needlewomen (pl)) → costurera f
to be a good needlewomancoser bien

needlewoman

[ˈniːdlˌwʊmən] n (-women (pl)) (old) → cucitrice f
References in classic literature ?
From their faces it seemed that for the most part they made no effort at all, and, recumbent as it were, accepted the ideas the words gave as representing goodness, in the same way, no doubt, as one of those industrious needlewomen had accepted the bright ugly pattern on her mat as beauty.
The best needlewomen will be awarded with valuable gifts and prizes.
Alexander, Women, Work, and Representation: Needlewomen in Victorian Art and Literature (Athens: Ohio Univ.
The two dedicated enthusiasts sometimes call on the skills of needlewomen Irene Wilson and her daughter, Jane, of Sew and Sew, Horden, who do the stitching.
In Women, Work, and Representation: Needlewomen in Victorian Art and Literature Lynn Alexander notes that "Regardless of their social class, all women in Victorian England [and in Spain, we might add] were taught to sew.
Amongst the female inmates nine were employed as nurses, five as cleaners, and fifteen as needlewomen.
Jewelry with amber, handmade by Latvian craftsmen, flax linen, wool sweaters, mittens and socks, made by our needlewomen, a set of wooden spoons and even a ceramic pitcher with St.
Slavery supported a rising standard of living, far away from the source of labor, and created European demand for the luxuries of life like the silk at which Merian made her living, designing patterns for needlewomen, illustrating books of flowers for patterns, devising ways to keep dyed fabric from fading in the wash, and manufacturing paints.
The event also gave residents their first opportunity to see the Newtown Community Heritage Quilt, created by local needlewomen and featured in the Gazette.
Famine and fashion; needlewomen in the nineteenth century.
It started out as a task taken on by five needlewomen at the church but ended up embracing the Weddington community.