negligence


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Related to negligence: Medical negligence

neg·li·gence

 (nĕg′lĭ-jəns)
n.
1. The state or quality of being negligent.
2. A negligent act or a failure to act.
3. Law
a. Failure to use the degree of care appropriate to the circumstances, resulting in an unintended injury to another.
b. An act or omission showing such lack of care.

negligence

(ˈnɛɡlɪdʒəns)
n
1. the state or quality of being negligent
2. a negligent act
3. (Law) law a civil wrong whereby a person or party is in breach of a legal duty of care to another which results in loss or injury to the claimant

neg•li•gence

(ˈnɛg lɪ dʒəns)

n.
1. the quality, fact, or result of being negligent; neglect.
2. an instance of being negligent.
3. Law. the failure to exercise a reasonable degree of care, esp. for the protection of other persons.
[1300–50; Middle English, variant of necligence < Latin necligentia. See negligent, -ence]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.negligence - failure to act with the prudence that a reasonable person would exercise under the same circumstances
nonaccomplishment, nonachievement - an act that does not achieve its intended goal
dereliction - willful negligence
comparative negligence - (law) negligence allocated between the plaintiff and the defendant with a corresponding reduction in damages paid to the plaintiff
concurrent negligence - (law) negligence of two of more persons acting independently; the plaintiff may sue both together or separately
contributory negligence - (law) behavior by the plaintiff that contributes to the harm resulting from the defendant's negligence; "in common law any degree of contributory negligence would bar the plaintiff from collecting damages"
criminal negligence, culpable negligence - (law) recklessly acting without reasonable caution and putting another person at risk of injury or death (or failing to do something with the same consequences)
neglect of duty - (law) breach of a duty
dodging, escape, evasion - nonperformance of something distasteful (as by deceit or trickery) that you are supposed to do; "his evasion of his clear duty was reprehensible"; "that escape from the consequences is possible but unattractive"
2.negligence - the trait of neglecting responsibilities and lacking concern
carelessness, sloppiness - the quality of not being careful or taking pains
dereliction, willful neglect, delinquency - a tendency to be negligent and uncaring; "he inherited his delinquency from his father"; "his derelictions were not really intended as crimes"; "his adolescent protest consisted of willful neglect of all his responsibilities"
laxness, remissness, laxity, slackness - the quality of being lax and neglectful

negligence

negligence

noun
The state or quality of being negligent:
Translations
إهْمال، قِلَّة إهْتِمام
nedbalost
uagtsomhed
huolimattomuus
kæruleysi
nevērībanolaidība
malomarnost
dikkatsizlikihmalkârlık

negligence

[ˈneglɪdʒəns] N
1. (= carelessness) → negligencia f
through negligencepor negligencia
2. (Jur) → negligencia f

negligence

[ˈnɛglɪdʒəns] nnégligence f

negligence

n (= carelessness)Nachlässigkeit f; (causing danger, Jur) → Fahrlässigkeit f

negligence

[ˈnɛglɪdʒns] nnegligenza
through negligence → per negligenza
criminal negligence (Law) → reato d'omissione

negligence

(ˈneglidʒəns) noun
carelessness. The accident was caused by the driver's negligence.
ˈnegligent adjective
ˈnegligently adverb

neg·li·gence

n. negligencia, descuido.

negligence

n negligencia
References in classic literature ?
There had been some negligence, some care- lessness, you see, when father was ill.
She began to set the toilet-stand to rights, grumbling at the negligence of the quadroon, who was in the adjoining room putting the children to bed.
Instead of a reprimand for their previous negligence, the case seemed rather to require an eulogium on their praiseworthy caution after the mischief had happened; a grateful recognition of the promptitude of their zeal the moment that there was no longer any remedy.
Design could never bring them in each other's way: negligence could never leave them exposed to a surprise; and chance had less in its favour in the crowd of London than even in the retirement of Barton, where it might force him before her while paying that visit at Allenham on his marriage, which Mrs.
He is a dark- skinned gipsy in aspect, in dress and manners a gentleman: that is, as much a gentleman as many a country squire: rather slovenly, perhaps, yet not looking amiss with his negligence, because he has an erect and handsome figure; and rather morose.
It was not a reckless manner, the manner in which he said these words aloud under the fast-sailing clouds, nor was it more expressive of negligence than defiance.
I was so filled with the play, and with the past - for it was, in a manner, like a shining transparency, through which I saw my earlier life moving along - that I don't know when the figure of a handsome well-formed young man dressed with a tasteful easy negligence which I have reason to remember very well, became a real presence to me.
Availing himself of their negligence, by a sudden exertion of strength and activity, Gurth shook himself free of their hold, and might have escaped, could he have resolved to leave his master's property behind him.
This proceeds in a great measure from the diversity of religions which are tolerated there, either by negligence or from motives of policy; and the same cause hath produced such various revolutions, revolts, and civil wars within these later ages.
Lothario said, too, that every married man should have some friend who would point out to him any negligence he might be guilty of in his conduct, for it will sometimes happen that owing to the deep affection the husband bears his wife either he does not caution her, or, not to vex her, refrains from telling her to do or not to do certain things, doing or avoiding which may be a matter of honour or reproach to him; and errors of this kind he could easily correct if warned by a friend.
The trial need never have come on, or might have been managed differently; and this last act, or crowning folly, will seem to have occurred through our negligence and cowardice, who might have saved you, if we had been good for anything; and you might have saved yourself, for there was no difficulty at all.
It was two storeys high; showed no window, nothing but a door on the lower storey and a blind forehead of discoloured wall on the upper; and bore in every feature, the marks of prolonged and sordid negligence.