Negro


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Related to Negro: Martin Luther King

Ne·gro

 (nē′grō)
n. pl. Ne·groes Often Offensive
1. A black person.
2. A member of the Negroid race. Not in scientific use.

[Spanish and Portuguese negro, black, black person, from Latin niger, nigr-, black; see nekw-t- in Indo-European roots.]

Ne′gro adj.

Negro

(ˈniːɡrəʊ)
n, pl -groes
(Peoples) a member of any of the dark-skinned indigenous peoples of Africa and their descendants elsewhere
adj
(Peoples) relating to or characteristic of Negroes
[C16: from Spanish or Portuguese: black, from Latin niger black]
ˈNegroˌism n

Negro

(ˈneɪɡrəʊ; ˈnɛɡ-)
n
1. (Placename) a river in NW South America, rising in E Colombia (as the Guainía) and flowing east, then south as part of the border between Colombia and Venezuela, entering Brazil and continuing southeast to join the Amazon at Manáus. Length: about 2250 km (1400 miles)
2. (Placename) a river in S central Argentina, formed by the confluence of the Neuquén and Limay Rivers and flowing east and southeast to the Atlantic. Length: about 1014 km (630 miles)
3. (Placename) a river in central Uruguay, rising in S Brazil and flowing southwest into the Uruguay River. Length: about 467 km (290 miles)

Ne•gro1

(ˈni groʊ)

n., pl. -groes,
adj. Older Use: Sometimes Offensive. n.
1. a member of any of the indigenous peoples of sub-Saharan Africa, or one of their descendants.
adj.
2. of or designating Negroes.
[1545–55; < Sp and Portuguese negro black < Latin nigrum, masculine acc. of niger black]
usage: See black.

Ne•gro2

(ˈneɪ groʊ; Sp. ˈnɛ grɔ)
; Port. ne′gro͝o),
n.
1. a river in NW South America, flowing SE from Colombia into the Amazon. 1400 mi. (2255 km) long.
2. a river in S Argentina, flowing E from the Andes to the Atlantic. 700 mi. (1125 km) long.
3. a river in SE South America, flowing SW from Brazil into the Uruguay River. ab. 500 mi. (800 km) long.
Portuguese, Rio Negro. Spanish, Río Negro.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Negro - a person with dark skin who comes from Africa (or whose ancestors came from Africa)Negro - a person with dark skin who comes from Africa (or whose ancestors came from Africa)
individual, mortal, person, somebody, someone, soul - a human being; "there was too much for one person to do"
Africa - the second largest continent; located to the south of Europe and bordered to the west by the South Atlantic and to the east by the Indian Ocean
person of color, person of colour - (formal) any non-European non-white person
Negress - a Black woman or girl
Black race, Negro race, Negroid race - a dark-skinned race
Black man - a man who is Black
Black woman - a woman who is Black
colored, colored person - a United States term for Blacks that is now considered offensive
darkey, darkie, darky - (ethnic slur) offensive term for Black people
jigaboo, nigga, nigger, nigra, coon, spade - (ethnic slur) extremely offensive name for a Black person; "only a Black can call another Black a nigga"
Tom, Uncle Tom - (ethnic slur) offensive and derogatory name for a Black man who is abjectly servile and deferential to Whites
picaninny, piccaninny, pickaninny - (ethnic slur) offensive term for a Black child
archaicism, archaism - the use of an archaic expression
Adj.1.negro - relating to or characteristic of or being a member of the traditional racial division of mankind having brown to black pigmentation and tightly curled hair
black - of or belonging to a racial group having dark skin especially of sub-Saharan African origin; "a great people--a black people--...injected new meaning and dignity into the veins of civilization"- Martin Luther King Jr.
Translations
زِنْجي، رَجُل أسْوَد
černoch
neger
néger
svertingi
negras
nēģeris

Negro

[ˈniːgrəʊ] (pej in US)
A. ADJnegro
B. N (Negroes (pl)) → negro m
C. Negro spiritual Nespiritual m

Negro

[ˈniːgrəʊ] [Negroes] (pl) (old-fashioned)
adj
(gen)noir(e)
[music, arts] → nègre, noir(e)
nNoir(e) m/f

Negro

(neg!)
adjNeger- (neg!); Negro slaveNegersklave m/-sklavin f
nSchwarze(r) m, → Neger m (neg!)

Negro

[ˈniːgrəʊ] (offensive)
1. adjnegro/a
2. n (-es (pl)) → negro/a

Negro

(ˈniːgrəu) feminine ˈNegress: plural ˈNegroes noun
a name for a person belonging to or descended from the black-skinned race from the area of Africa south of the Sahara.
References in classic literature ?
The third, and not the least numerous or influential, is composed of all that delicate gentility which cannot bear a superior, and cannot brook an equal; of that class whose Republicanism means, 'I will not tolerate a man above me: and of those below, none must approach too near;' whose pride, in a land where voluntary servitude is shunned as a disgrace, must be ministered to by slaves; and whose inalienable rights can only have their growth in negro wrongs.
I had associated them with the Negro of the past, not with the Negro who was struggling upward.
There was only one break in the dreary monotony of that month: when Blind d'Arnault, the Negro pianist, came to town.
Neither was this all; for my goods being all English manufacture, such as cloths, stuffs, baize, and things particularly valuable and desirable in the country, I found means to sell them to a very great advantage; so that I might say I had more than four times the value of my first cargo, and was now infinitely beyond my poor neighbour - I mean in the advancement of my plantation; for the first thing I did, I bought me a negro slave, and an European servant also - I mean another besides that which the captain brought me from Lisbon.
The divine and the negro seized the incarcerated Gaul by his legs and extricated him from a snow-bank of three feet in depth, whence his voice had sounded as from the tombs.
Everybody knows Black Sam, the old negro fisherman, or, as he is commonly called, "Mud Sam," who has fished about the Sound for the last half century.
Rio Negro -- Estancias attacked by the Indians -- Salt-Lakes -- Flamingoes -- R.
It was so in the Pequod with the little negro Pippin by nick-name, Pip by abbreviation.
The fields about it were overgrown with brambles, the fences gone, even the few negro quarters, and out-houses generally, fallen partly into ruin by neglect and pillage; for the negroes and poor whites of the vicinity found in the building and fences an abundant supply of fuel, of which they availed themselves without hesitation, openly and by daylight.
Two of them were young students from a medical college a few miles away; the third was a gigantic negro known as Jess.
A giant negro, fantastically dressed in a red embroidered coat, yellow trousers and a military cap, discreetly distributed cards to those of the passing crowd who consented to take them.
To all intents and purposes Roxy was as white as anybody, but the one sixteenth of her which was black outvoted the other fifteen parts and made her a Negro.