nemesis


Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

nem·e·sis

 (nĕm′ĭ-sĭs)
n. pl. nem·e·ses (-sēz′)
1. A source of harm or ruin: Uncritical trust is my nemesis.
2. Retributive justice in its execution or outcome: To follow the proposed course of action is to invite nemesis.
3. An opponent that cannot be beaten or overcome.
4. One that inflicts retribution or vengeance.
5. Nemesis Greek Mythology The goddess of retributive justice or vengeance.

[Greek, retribution, the goddess Nemesis, from nemein, to allot; see nem- in Indo-European roots.]

Nemesis

(ˈnɛmɪsɪs)
n, pl -ses (-ˌsiːz)
1. (Classical Myth & Legend) Greek myth the goddess of retribution and vengeance
2. (sometimes not capital) any agency of retribution and vengeance
[C16: via Latin from Greek: righteous wrath, from némein to distribute what is due]

nem•e•sis

(ˈnɛm ə sɪs)

n., pl. -ses (-ˌsiz)
1. a source or cause of harm or failure.
2. an unconquerable opponent or rival.
3. (cap.) the ancient Greek goddess of divine retribution.
4. an agent or act of retribution.
[1575–85; < Latin < Greek]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.nemesis - (Greek mythology) the goddess of divine retribution and vengeanceNemesis - (Greek mythology) the goddess of divine retribution and vengeance
Greek mythology - the mythology of the ancient Greeks
2.nemesis - something causing misery or deathnemesis - something causing misery or death; "the bane of my life"
affliction - a cause of great suffering and distress

nemesis

noun retribution, fate, destruction, destiny, vengeance So far they had escaped their nemesis, but that afternoon it was to fall heavily on them.

nemesis

noun
One who is hostile to or opposes the purposes or interests of another:
Translations
arkkivihollinenkohtaloperivihollinen
nêmese

nemesis

[ˈnemɪsɪs] N (nemeses (pl)) → (justo) castigo m
AIDS is our collective nemesisSIDA representa nuestro castigo colectivo

nemesis

[ˈnɛməsɪs] nnémésis f

nemesis

nNemesis f (liter), → die gerechte Strafe

Nemesis

[ˈnɛmɪsɪs] n (Myth) → Nemesi f (fig) nemesisnemesi f
References in classic literature ?
The Nemesis of the delicate ones was creeping on apace.
And we see in it, I think, an admirable instance of the unexpected forms in which the great Nemesis hides herself.
No, certainly; I pity him in proportion to his struggles, for they foreshadow the inward suffering which is the worst form of Nemesis.
But there is the terrible Nemesis following on some errors, that it is always possible for those who like it to interpret them into a crime: there is no proof in favor of the man outside his own consciousness and assertion.
Rokoff sat frozen with fear, unable to move a hand or foot, his eyes riveted upon the face of his Nemesis.
There was no sound, barely a struggle of the convulsively stiffening old muscles, and then, with a push from De Vac, the body lunged forward into the Thames, where a dull splash marked the end of the last hope that Prince Richard might be rescued from the clutches of his Nemesis.
On a French liner it were an easy matter, Olga, permanently to settle this Nemesis of ours.
with its catalogue of wrongdoings and violence ever increasing until Aidos and Nemesis are forced to leave mankind who thenceforward shall have `no remedy against evil'.
There is a Nemesis which overtakes generosity too, like all the other imprudences of men who dare to be lawless and proud .
And I pray Nemesis not to visit upon me the words which I am going to utter.
This is that ancient doctrine of Nemesis, who keeps watch in the universe and lets no offence go unchastised.
For which reason the antients used, on such occasions, to sacrifice to the goddess Nemesis, a deity who was thought by them to look with an invidious eye on human felicity, and to have a peculiar delight in overturning it.