neoclassicism


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ne·o·clas·si·cism

also Ne·o·clas·si·cism  (nē′ō-klăs′ĭ-sĭz′əm)
n.
1. A revival of classical aesthetics and forms, especially:
a. A revival in literature in the late 1600s and 1700s, characterized by a regard for the classical ideals of reason, form, and restraint.
b. A revival in the 1700s and 1800s in architecture and art, especially in the decorative arts, characterized by order, symmetry, and simplicity of style.
c. A movement in music lasting roughly from 1915 to 1940 that sought to avoid subjective emotionalism and to return to the style of the pre-Romantic composers.
2. Any of various intellectual movements that embrace a set of traditional principles regarded as fundamental or authoritative.

ne′o·clas′sic, ne′o·clas′si·cal adj.
ne′o·clas′si·cist n.

neoclassicism

(ˌniːəʊˈklæsɪˌsɪzəm)
n
1. (Art Movements) a late 18th- and early 19th-century style in architecture, decorative art, and fine art, based on the imitation of surviving classical models and types
2. (Classical Music) music a movement of the 1920s, involving Hindemith, Stravinsky, etc, that sought to avoid the emotionalism of late romantic music by reviving the use of counterpoint, forms such as the classical suite, and small instrumental ensembles
ˌneoˈclassicist n
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.neoclassicism - revival of a classical style (in art or literature or architecture or music) but from a new perspective or with a new motivation
artistic style, idiom - the style of a particular artist or school or movement; "an imaginative orchestral idiom"
arts, humanistic discipline, humanities, liberal arts - studies intended to provide general knowledge and intellectual skills (rather than occupational or professional skills); "the college of arts and sciences"
Translations

neoclassicism

[ˈniːəʊˈklæsɪsɪzəm] Nneoclasicismo m
References in periodicals archive ?
The Old Guitarist [Photo: Wikipedia] Due to his massive experimental processes, his works are classified in a number of phases such as Blue Period, African Art Primitivism, Surrealism and Neoclassicism and Synthetic Cubism.
In the context of the Nazis' scheme for Germany's rebirth as the hub of a new world civilization, stripped neoclassicism was supposed to symbolize the eternity of the Nordic race, whether it was deployed in a ministry building, an airport terminal, or the Great Hall of the rebuilt center of Berlin, now transformed into Germania, the capital of a post-humanist world and political centre of the new total, Aryan, and modernist state (Griffin 2007, 250-335).
PARIS Jiri Kylian may have no current plans to choreograph new work, but that hasn't lessened the ballet world's obsession with his particular brand of neoclassicism.
To his considerable chagrin, this meant he would miss Jacques Ibert's Flute Concerto and Stravinsky's The Firebird, the final work in a concert that was an intoxicating mixture of impressionism and Neoclassicism.
Tampinco's greatest contribution is incorporating Filipino articles on neoclassical sculpting, like palm, bamboo, anahaw-something new in the art world of neoclassicism and baroque revival, which were at their height during the late 19th and early 20th century.
James Tobin takes an important and determined step toward reviving interest in these figures, informed largely by Tobin's personal perspective as a fan of neoclassicism.
Dabakis notes that neoclassicism was more popular in the nineteenth century than has been acknowledged.
Widdifield and Niell want to challenge univocal and simplistic approaches to neoclassicism in Latin America, championed half a century ago by Toussaint, Chariot, and Kubler, among others.
In rethinking the sculpture of American expatriate women within the frames of women's rights, neoclassicism, postcolonialism, and the American political sphere at midcentury, A Sisterhood of Sculptors offers a new touchstone that will shape scholars' understanding of these artists and of the field of American sculpture as a whole.
Andrew Wyeth: Looking Out, Looking In, through Nov 30, and From Neoclassicism to Futurism: Italian Prints and Drawings, 1800-1925, Sept.
He is regarded as a key figure in transition from the Russian neoclassicism to romanticism.
It doesn't match the magisterial fifth symphony but it's an engaging work and the ballet's spikier neoclassicism makes for a stimulating contrast.